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Reports that antibacterials in pregnancy are 'harmful' unfounded

Conclusion This experimental study in mice demonstrates the ability of TCC, a substance found in some antibacterial soaps, to transfer from mother to baby across the placenta and through breast milk. Moreover, this had signs of developmental effects on new-born mice, reducing brain size. It also increased body weight, which was associated with poorer fat metabolism in the female mice. This research adds to the body of research suggesting that triclocarban, like the antiseptic triclosan, has potentially harmful effects and should not be used in consumer products. However, the study was carried out on mice and they are not biologically identical to people. TCC was also given directly through daily drinking water. The dose given was said to be similar to that found in US water supplies – however, the authors did say it is a common contaminant of wastewater. They didn't say anything about levels in household drinking water supplies. Therefore it is not completely clear from the study how relevant this dose is. Also, the levels in US water supplies may not be relevant to the UK. Even if it is similar to our exposure – through water, soap or otherwise – the effects to human foetus and new-born development might not be as severe, if it has any effect at all. TCC is being phased out of products. If you are pregnant or breast feeding and are concerned about potential exposure, there are a range of soaps and other products out there that do not contain...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

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Conclusion: Our results link transportation noise exposure to development of obesity and suggest that combined exposure from different sources may be particularly harmful. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910 Received: 17 March 2017 Revised: 5 October 2017 Accepted: 9 October 2017 Published: 20 November 2017 Address correspondence to A. Pyko, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Telephone: 46(0) 852487561. Email: Andrei.pyko@ki.se Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1910). The authors declare they have no actual or potential competing fina...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Concentrations of MnBP, MBzP and MEHP similar to those found in the urine of pregnant women consistently altered hCG and PPARγ expression in primary placental cells. These findings provide evidence for the molecular basis by which phthalates may alter placental function, and they provide a preliminary mechanistic hypothesis for opposite responses by sex. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1539 Received: 23 December 2016 Revised: 6 September 2017 Accepted: 18 September 2017 Published: 31 October 2017 Address correspondence to J.J. Adibi, 130 Desoto Street, Parran Hall 5132, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 USA. Telephone...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis systematic review identified limited evidence that women with increased body size are more likely to present with DFM but do not have impaired perception of fetal movements. In women with DFM, increased body size is associated with worse pregnancy outcome, including stillbirth.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Systematic review Source Type: research
Your Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measurement of your body fat percentage. And based on the results, you are labeled normal, overweight or obese.   But BMI can give you some crazy results. Using this measurement, I’m considered obese. And so is NFL superstar Tom Brady. You see, BMI only compares your height against your weight. It doesn’t distinguish between fat and muscle. But here’s the thing… Muscle is much denser than fat. So if you have a lot of muscle, you can have a high BMI but still be lean. There’s a much more reliable test to measure your body’s composition of fat and mu...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
Conclusions: Our results suggest that, although the role of individual and neighborhood factors remains prevailing in explaining black–white differences in birth outcomes, the individual contribution of PM2.5 is comparable in magnitude to any single individual- or neighborhood-level factor. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP490 Received: 10 May 2016 Revised: 16 December 2016 Accepted: 03 January 2017 Published: 04 October 2017 Address correspondence to T. Benmarhnia, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Joll...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Peroral arsenic has little effect on local airway immune responses to bacteria but compromises respiratory epithelial barrier integrity, increasing systemic translocation of inhaled pathogens and small molecules. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1878 Received: 09 March 2017 Revised: 14 August 2017 Accepted: 16 August 2017 Published: 28 September 2017 Address correspondence to M.B. Fessler, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Dr., P.O. Box 12233, Maildrop D2-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA. Telephone: (919) 541-3701. Email: fesslerm@niehs.nih.gov *Current address: UN...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that maternal BPA exposure has dose- and sex-specific effects on pancreatic islets of adult F1 and F2 mice offspring. The transmission of these changes across multiple generations may involve either mitochondrial dysfunction and/or epigenetic modifications. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1674 Received: 25 January 2017 Revised: 26 July 2017 Accepted: 26 July 2017 Published: 27 September 2017 Please address correspondence to R.A. Simmons, Center for Research on Reproduction and Women’s Health, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 1308 BRB II/III, 421 Curie Bl...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our findings suggest that arsenic exposure is not associated with obesity, and that urinary creatinine and osmolality may be colliders on the causal pathway from arsenic exposure to obesity, as common descendants of hydration and body composition. In studies of urinary biomarkers and obesity or obesity-related outcomes, alternative metrics such as urinary flow rate or analytic strategies such as covariate-adjusted standardization should be considered. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1202 Received: 07 October 2016 Revised: 21 March 2017 Accepted: 30 March 2017 Published: 28 August 2017 Address correspondence t...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
(Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016;95(9):965–967) This editorial addresses the various reasons why maternal obesity is such a challenge. A third of pregnant women in Nordic countries and up to half in the United States are overweight or obese. Even women of normal weight tend to gain excessive amounts of weight during pregnancy and often maintain this weight gain postpartum. In addition, maternal obesity is a major contributor to maternal, fetal and neonatal complications. Pregnancy outcomes, long-term maternal health, and obesity risk for their offspring are all adversely affected. The editorial reviews information a...
Source: Obstetric Anesthesia Digest - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Editorials and Reviews Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our estimates corroborate reports from several recent epidemiological studies of associations between PBDE exposures and neurobehavioral outcomes, and they support the inclusion of BDE-209 in the persistent organic pollutant (POP) convention as well as the need for strategies to reduce exposures to PBDE mixtures, including maximum residue limits for PBDEs in food and measures for limiting the release of PBDEs from consumer waste. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP826 Received: 18 July 2016 Revised: 06 May 2017 Accepted: 09 May 2017 Published: 23 August 2017 Address correspondence to A. Kortenkamp, Brunel Univer...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
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