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Opioid Overdoses and Deaths Flooding U.S. Hospitals

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 -- There's been a sharp rise in opioid-related admissions and deaths in hospital intensive care units across the United States, a new study finds. Opioids are pain medications, such as oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet) and...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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Conclusion Some Medicaid recipients who gained coverage under the ACA may have become addicted to opioids, but we find little evidence that Medicaid expansion caused aggregate drug-related death rates to increase. Future research on the opioid epidemic should develop approaches that untangle the effects of Medicaid expansion from pre-existing economic trends and the spread of accessible illegal drugs. That said, by addressing the causes of addiction and promoting appropriate treatment, Medicaid could be an important tool for policy makers in the fight against opioid abuse. In January 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medi...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Following the ACA Medicaid and CHIP Public Health Quality Medicaid expansion opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs
Few receive medication - assisted treatment after hospital discharge, researchers find
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Psychiatry, Anesthesiology & Pain, Journal, Source Type: news
Conclusions: These findings suggest that SGB could have antioxidative effects against AMI, and the protective effect of right SGB was more effective than that of left SGB. Thus, the right SGB could be an effective and safe method of local anesthesia to protect against cardiac damage due to oxidative stress.
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
By DAVID INTROCASO In mid-July 3 Quarks Daily posted an essay written by Umair Haque, a London-based consultant and frequent contributor to the online Harvard Business Review, that argued “the American experiment is at an end.”   This is because unlike every other rich country the US lacks, Haque stated, essential moral universals defined as “sophisticated, broad and expansive public goods that improve by the year.” These include higher education, a responsible media, transport, welfare and healthcare. Democracies depend on these moral universals available to everyone because these benefit...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: These new resources offer substantial advances to classical toxicity testing paradigms by including genetically sensitive individuals that may inform toxicity risks for sensitive subpopulations. Both in vivo and complementary in vitro resources provide platforms with which to reduce uncertainty by providing population-level data around biological variability. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1274 Received: 25 October 2016 Revised: 19 April 2017 Accepted: 27 April 2017 Published: 15 August 2017 Address correspondence to K.A. McAllister, Program Administrator, Genes, Environment, and Health Branch, Division of E...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Pain associated with integumentary wounds is highly prevalent yet it remains an area of significant unmet need within healthcare. Currently, systemically administered opioids are the mainstay of treatment. However, recent publications are casting opioids in a negative light given their high side effect profile, inhibition of wound healing, and association with accidental overdose, incidents that are frequently fatal. Thus, novel analgesic strategies for wound-related pain need to be investigated.
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Clinical Notes Source Type: research
In response to the growing heroin epidemic in the United States, the National Library of Medicine’s Specialized Information Services has created a portal to provide resources and information on prescribing, overdose, medication-assisted treatment, and recovery. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, addiction is defined as: “A primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry. Dysfunction in these circuits leads to characteristic biological, psychological, social and spiritual manifestations. This is reflected in an individual pathologically pursuing reward an...
Source: Dragonfly - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: News from NLM Public Health Source Type: news
“I think my friend has attempted suicide” an 11-year-old child haltingly admitted after I introduced myself as a crisis counselor with a national hotline and asked how I could help.*  Over the next half hour I learned that this child and her friend had been facing ongoing cyber- and face-to-face bullying at school that was such a common occurrence the caller sounded nonchalant. The caller’s friend, however, had already attempted suicide at least twice in her young 12 years of life. In the middle of our call, my caller received a text from her friend saying that she was okay, had been i...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Primary care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
The rising opioid overdose death rate is a serious problem and deserves serious attention. Yesterday, during his working vacation, President Trump convened a group of experts to give him a briefing on the issue and to suggest further action. Some, like New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who heads the White House Drug Addiction Task Force, arecalling for him to declare a “national public health emergency.” But calling it a “national emergency” is not helpful. It only fosters an air of panic, which all-too-often leads to hastily conceived policy decisions that are not evidence-based, and have deleter...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The widely accepted use of acetaminophen pain relievers, such as Tylenol, has been shown in scientific studies to deplete levels of our bodies’ master antioxidant, glutathione. Parents should question the popular notion that dozens of vaccine doses in infancy are safe, and they should certainly research the damaging effects acetaminophen can have on the developing brain. References: http://articles.mercola.com/…vaccine-dosage-for-babies.aspx https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003292.htm http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=97635&page=1 http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=97635&page=1 h...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Missy Fluegge Top Stories acetaminophen glutathione truth about vaccines Tylenol Source Type: blogs
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