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EMS Physicians Endorse Toxicology Groups' Opioid Safety Precautions Guidance

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) announces its endorsement of a new American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) document detailing pragmatic and actionable safety precautions for first responders in opioid overdose situations. NAEMSP is an organization of physicians and other professionals partnering to provide leadership and foster excellence in the subspecialty of EMS medicine. In pursuing its mission to improve out-of-hospital emergency medical care, NAEMSP’s Executive Board and Standards and Clinical Practice Committee voted unanimously to endorse the opioid safety guidance. This crucial document enables an appropriate and measured communication of risk, allowing first responders to understand their genuine risk of exposure and avoid unnecessary fear or over-preparing to a point where they’re impaired in performing their job. “NAEMSP wholly endorses this impressive and highly-anticipated document and we will share it with our members and build on it with actionable guides that will be available for free to the public,” said Dr. Brent Myers, President of NAEMSP. “It’s important that our community act upon the most recent and best quality evidence available to us right now, as well as to stay vigilant and prepared to revise our procedures and advise our members as we continue to develop knowledge about dangerous substances.” Over the las...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

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WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) announces its endorsement of a new American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) document detailing pragmatic and actionable safety precautions for first responders in opioid overdose situations. NAEMSP is an organization of physicians and other professionals partnering to provide leadership and foster excellence in the subspecialty of EMS medicine. In pursuing its mission to improve out-of-hospital emergency medical care, NAEMSP’s Executive Board and Standards and Clinical Practice Committe...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news
The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) announces its endorsement of a new American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) document detailing pragmatic and actionable safety precautions for first responders in opioid overdose situations. NAEMSP is an organization of physicians and other professionals partnering to provide leadership and foster excellence in the subspecialty of EMS medicine. In pursuing its mission to improve out-of-hospital emergency medical care, NAEMSP’s Executive Board and Standards and Clinical Practice Committee voted unanimously to...
Source: JEMS Operations - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Industry News Operations Source Type: news
The United States is currently in the midst of a public health crisis due to the opioid epidemic. A record number of individuals —47,055—died of a drug overdose (OD) in 2014.1 Although the drug poisoning death rate has been highest among 45- to 54-year-olds, an increase in mortality has also been seen in youth. Poisoning deaths among adolescents increased by 91% between 2000 and 2009, largely due to an increase in OD from prescription drugs.2 All physicians, both pediatric and adult, are needed to change the course of the opioid epidemic.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Clinical perspectives Source Type: research
Drug and Addiction Information and Tools for Patrons and Healthcare Providers Opioid Abuse and Addiction – Contains links to the following Current News, Diagnosis and Tests, Prevention and Risk Factors, Treatments and Therapies, Clinical Trials, Journal Articles, Find an Expert, Statistics, and Research, NIH MedlinePlus Magazines MedlinePlus links to health information from the National Institutes of Health and other federal government agencies. MedlinePlus also links to health information from non-government Web sites. See MedlinePlus.gov disclaimer and quality guidelines National Library of Medicine Drug Informatio...
Source: The Cornflower - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Resource Sharing opioid epidemic opioid resources Source Type: news
Authors: Faul M, Lurie P, Kinsman JM, Dailey MW, Crabaugh C, Sasser SM Abstract BACKGROUND: Opioid overdoses are at epidemic levels in the United States. Emergency Medical Service (EMS) providers may administer naloxone to restore patient breathing and prevent respiratory arrest. There was a need for contemporary data to examine the number of naloxone administrations in an EMS encounter. METHODS: Using data from the National Emergency Medical Services Information System, we examined data from 2012-5 to determine trends in patients receiving multiple naloxone administrations (MNAs). Logistic regression including...
Source: Prehospital Emergency Care - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Prehosp Emerg Care Source Type: research
The authors of a recent Health Affairs Blog post argue that 42 CFR Part 2, the law designed to protect confidentiality of patients with substance use disorders, is outdated and unnecessary. We could not disagree more. 42 CFR Part 2 provides bedrock protections for people with substance use disorders that are as critical now as they were in the 1970s when the law was first enacted. The purpose of the confidentiality law is to ensure that a person with a substance use disorder is not made more vulnerable to discriminatory practices and legal consequences as a result of seeking treatment. Unfortunately, patients with sub...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Population Health Public Health Quality 42 CFR Part 2 HIPAA opioid epidemic patient discrimination patient privacy substance use treatment Source Type: blogs
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
McLean Hospital Guest Blogger Hilary Smith Connery, MD, PhD Self-inflicted injury is now the 8th leading cause of mortality, while suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. That's a stunning number of people dying by their own hand in one form or another, and in addition to galvanizing public health prevention efforts, these statistics pose an urgent need to identify root causes and more effective treatment systems. Treatment works, but beyond having access to appropriate medical and psychological help, the social environment is critical to creating successful recovery opportunities for those suff...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In this “Lucky 13” episode of the TPR podcast, Steven and Leon discuss naloxone, and address the following issues:   Does the concept of a “heroin overdose patient” have meaning anymore in this age of U-47700, fentanyl, and carfentanil? Given the adulteration of both heroin and counterfeit prescription medications with extremely potent synthetic opioids, do we have to reconsider our entire approach to opioid overdose patients? Can past medical literature guide us in our management of these patients?(Hint: the answer is no.) What medical toxicology paper do Steve and Leon — in an unusual ...
Source: The Poison Review - Category: Toxicology Authors: Tags: Podcast Source Type: news
By Ike Swetlitz Easy access to opioids has harmed even society's youngest members: The number of children and teenagers hospitalized for painkiller poisoning has doubled in recent decades, according to a study published Monday. Why it matters: This is the first study to look at national hospitalization rates among children and adolescents for opioid poisonings. "I'm really happy to see that the authors have looked at the potential consequences of prescription opioid availability for adolescents and children," said Robert Bossarte, director of the West Virginia University Injury Control Research Center. "...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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