Heart attack - THIS could lower risk even if you have high blood pressure

HEART attacks - which are caused when blood supply to the heart is temporarily reduced or cut off - are usually caused by high cholesterol and high blood pressure.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In this study, we aimed to examine the association between metabolic health and its change over time and cardiovascular disease risk across BMI categories.MethodsBetween June and December, 1976, 121 701 female nurses were recruited to the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) of whom 103 298 returned a questionnaire in 1980 used as baseline in this study. After excluding women with a history of cardiovascular disease or cancer, with missing body weight and with underweight. 90 257 women were followed-up from 1980 to 2010 for incident cardiovascular disease. Participants were cross-classified by BMI categories, metabolic health ...
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: April 2005Source: The American Journal of Medicine Supplements, Volume 118, Supplement 2Author(s): Steven K. GrinspoonUse of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with the development of cardiovascular risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, fat redistribution, and hypertension. The results of the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study showed that HAART therapy is associated with a 26% relative risk increase in the rate of myocardial infarction per year of HAART exposure. A number of...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine Supplements - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, we aimed to examine the association between metabolic health and its change over time and cardiovascular disease risk across BMI categories.MethodsBetween June and December, 1976, 121 701 female nurses were recruited to the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) of whom 103 298 returned a questionnaire in 1980 used as baseline in this study. After excluding women with a history of cardiovascular disease or cancer, with missing body weight and with underweight. 90 257 women were followed-up from 1980 to 2010 for incident cardiovascular disease. Participants were cross-classified by BMI categories, metabolic health ...
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: April 2005Source: The American Journal of Medicine Supplements, Volume 118, Supplement 2Author(s): Steven K. GrinspoonUse of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with the development of cardiovascular risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, fat redistribution, and hypertension. The results of the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs study showed that HAART therapy is associated with a 26% relative risk increase in the rate of myocardial infarction per year of HAART exposure. A number of...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine Supplements - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
r U Abstract OBJECTIVE: Gut microbiota-dependent metabolites, in particular trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), have recently been reported to promote atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Here, we examined for the first time the relation of TMAO and the risk of incident cardiovascular events in patients with recent first-ever ischemic stroke in 2 independent prospective cohorts. Moreover, the link between TMAO and proinflammatory monocytes as a potential contributing factor for cardiovascular risk in stroke patients was studied. APPROACH AND RESULTS: In a first study (n=78), higher TMAO plasma levels were linked with a...
Source: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol Source Type: research
By ANISH KOKA Part 1 Part 2 Physicians have been making up numbers longer than people have been guessing weights at carnivals.  How much does this statin lower the chances of a heart attack? How long do I have to live if I don’t get the aortic valve surgery? In clinics across the land confident answers emerge from doctors in white coats.  Most of the answers are guesses based on whatever evidence about the matter exists applied to the patient sitting in the room.  The trouble is that the evidence base used to be the provenance of experts and anecdotes that have in the past concluded leeches were good f...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Elevated plasma concentrations of ceramides are independently associated with major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with and without coronary artery disease. PMID: 29903731 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol Source Type: research
WEDNESDAY, June 13, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Oscar Washington Jr. thought he was taking care of his heart. He went to the doctor every three months to stay on top of his high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol. He exercised...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
This study sought to analyze the sex differences in 30-day, 1-year, and long-term net adverse clinical events (NACEs) in Chinese adult patients with STEMI after PCI. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed 1920 consecutive STEMI patients (age ≤60 years) treated with PCI from January 01, 2006, to December 31, 2012. A propensity score analysis between males and females was performed to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics and comorbidities. The primary endpoint was the incidence of 3-year NACE. Survival curves were constructed with Kaplan-Meier estimates and compared by log-rank tests between the t...
Source: Chinese Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Chin Med J (Engl) Source Type: research
By now, most people are familiar with the factors that can increase the risk of having a heart attack: gaining too much weight, having high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels, smoking and not exercising enough. In a study published Monday in the journal Circulation, researchers say they have documented another risk factor that could help identify men at greatest risk of heart problems: Among a group of 1,900 men aged 60 to 78, those with erectile dysfunction were twice as likely as men without the condition to have a heart attack, stroke, or die of a heart problem. Around 20% of men over age 20 experience erectile ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Erectile Dysfunction healthytime heart onetime Source Type: news
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