Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

More Than 80% of Military Health Facilities Now Offer Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments

More than 80 percent of military health care facilities offer some form of complementary and alternative medicine—in addition to conventional medicine— mainly for pain management and psychological disorders.
Source: RAND - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: news

Related Links:

Alternative and Complementary Therapies , Vol. 0, No. 0.
Source: Alternative and Complementary Therapies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
In addition to conventional medicine, 83 percent of military health care facilities offer therapies like acupuncture, chiropractic, stress management, yoga, biofeedback, and massage for pain management and psychological disorders.
Source: RAND Research Health and Health Care - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight New Membership certificates have arrived! If you have completed the renewal process before Friday, July 21, you can expect to receive your certificate by the end of August. If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, check out our Membership renewal flyer for more information. The Summer 2017 edition of NIH MedlinePlus Magazine is now available! In this issue, Access Hollywood host Liz Hernandez talks about her hopes to make Alzheimer’s a thing of the past. Other features include ...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
Conclusions The study provides good evidence in support of the efficacy and safety of the Vatari guggulu along with Maharasnadi kwatha and Narayan taila in the management of Osteoarthritis knee.
Source: Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Despite some evidence for a positive effect in the short term, further randomized clinical trials of high methodological quality, using standardized procedures for the application of dry needling are needed. PMID: 28735825 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Med Source Type: research
Abstract Meniscal injury is one of the most common knee soft tissue injuries, commonly affecting young athletes and an older, degenerative population. Treatment largely depends on the type and extent of the injury with arthroscopic repair or meniscectomy being mainstays. Although non-surgical approaches have been described, there is no published literature regarding a combination of indirect osteopathic techniques and rehabilitation in the management of these injuries. The current case report follows a 20-year-old male presenting with a 5-day history of acute knee pain, following trauma during an Australian Rules ...
Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Med Source Type: research
ConclusionsAlthough CAM is used by many sufferers of headache/migraine, the use of CAM specifically for the treatment of headache/migraine is relatively low in the United States. The study also assesses the key differences of CAM use among headache/migraine sufferers in NHIS 2012 compared with those in NHIS 2007, and identifies shortfalls in the evidence‐base of several CAM modalities used by U.S. adults for headache/migraine. This information may assist health providers and consumers in making informed decisions about the safest and most appropriate approach to managing headache/migraine.
Source: Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Submission Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling It’s a question that has challenged generations of patients and their doctors. The answer has changed over the years. When I was in medical school in the early 1980s, bedrest for a week or more was often recommended for severe back pain. This sometimes included hospital admission. Then, research demonstrated that prolonged bedrest was actually a bad idea. It was no better (and often worse) than taking it easy for a day or two followed by slowly increasing activity, including stretching and strengthening the back. Medications, including pain relievers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Complementary and alternative medicine Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Alternative and Complementary Therapies , Vol. 0, No. 0.
Source: Alternative and Complementary Therapies - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion Although several CAM were found effective for chronic pain relief, it remains unclear when these modalities are a reasonable choice against or in conjunction with mainstream treatments. In that sense, future research with a clear emphasis on concurrent evaluation of CAM overall efficacy and patient adherence/tolerance is needed.
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
More News: Alternative and Complementary Therapies | Complementary Medicine | Health Management | Pain | Pain Management | Psychology