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One step closer in explaining MS relapse during upper respiratory infection

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) For most of us, the flu is just the flu. We suffer through it for several days, and eventually bounce back. But for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological diseases, the flu can trigger a cascade of immune responses that result in a full-blown relapse of the disease. In a recent study, Illinois researchers shed light on what may be happening in the brains of MS patients during upper respiratory infections.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Progress in multiple sclerosis research continues at an impressive pace, with contributions from basic science, translational research, and experimental therapeutics. Several publications in the past year have had a major impact on both our understanding of the disease and our ability to treat it.
Source: Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: 2017 Round-up Source Type: research
Publication date: 18 January 2018 Source:Neuroscience Letters, Volume 664 Author(s): Natalia Marangoni, Kathy Kowal, Zane Deliu, Kenneth Hensley, Douglas L. Feinstein Lanthionine ketimine ethyl ester (LKE) is a synthetic derivative of the naturally occurring amino acid lanthionine ketimine. We previously showed that LKE reduced clinical signs in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS) associated with reductions in axonal damage; however, whether LKE has direct beneficial actions on mammalian neuronal cells was not examined. In the current study, we tested the effects of LKE in SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells and in primary ...
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: February 2018 Source:Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, Volume 20 Author(s): Tarig Mohammed Abkur, Hugh Kearney, Michael J. Hennessy Natalizumab treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with a risk of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a rare opportunistic viral demyelinating disease caused by reactivation of John Cunningham virus (JCV). Herein, we report a case of a 40-year-old woman who developed refractory temporal lobe epilepsy; one year after recovery form Natalizumab-induced PML. Localisation related epilepsy, which may be refractory in nature, as in this ...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
We present here the first MS-case where rituximab-treatment led to grade IV neutropenia, with hospitalization and treatment of a serious infection with broad-spectrum antibiotics. The neutropenia resolved promptly with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-treatment and the patient recovered well. Due to risk of recurring neutropenia rituximab-treatment was not re-administered. We discuss the mechanisms and occurrence of neutropenia as a side effect to rituximab-treatment of MS, and remind of the importance of monitoring rituximab-treated MS-patients for this rare but potentially dangerous side effect.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion Near-falls occur commonly in individuals with MS; near-fallers and fallers reported similar circumstances surrounding fall events and demonstrated similar performance on standard timed walking tests. Clinicians monitoring individuals with MS should consider evaluation of the circumstances surrounding falls in combination with quantitative walking measures to improve determination of fall risk and appropriate rehabilitation interventions.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion The degree of lymphopenia in peripheral blood was not associated to the positive treatment response of fingolimod in RRMS patients.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions MS patients have thinner RNFL than normal controls, regardless their eyes had past episodes of ON or not. Eyes of MS patients lose their axons in a similar fashion regardless they had history of ON or not. Although ON causes RNFL loss, once resolved it does not influence the rate of RNFL loss in MS patients.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
We described a patient with cocaine abuse who presented with Balo's type acute multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain showed onion like patchy concentric ring enhancement on T1-weighted MRI with gadolinium. Balo's Concentric Sclerosis like radiological findings related to cocaine has not been reported. Levamisole is now frequently used as an ingredient in cocaine and may cause leukoencephalopathy. It is recommended to check urine levamisole levels in patients with cocaine-induced leukoencephalopathy with or without mimicking Balo's Concentric Sclerosis. On the other hand, it is also p...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions Texting alters gait patterns of pwMS differently from unaffected individuals, probably due to a different prioritization of the task, which appears to take into account the motor and sensory impairments associated with the disease by favoring the motor task.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions Severe relapses can be identified from administrative datasets with reasonable accuracy. The trend since 2009 toward outpatient relapse treatment will improve the sensitivity of relapse detection with longitudinal follow-up of this cohort and will allow comparison of severe relapse rates between different DMTs, supporting future comparative effectiveness studies.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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