Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Can Art Therapy Help Heal the Pain of PTSD?

Art therapy has experienced tremendous growth over the past two decades, not only advancing treatment options but also advancing into different populations and treatment settings. In particular, art therapists have been working with a very special and unique population — the military. For over 15 years, post-9/11 military service members and veterans have been coming home after serving sometimes multiple tours to Iraq and Afghanistan. Many have sustained physical and psychological combat injuries and require extensive care. While medical advancements have made it possible to survive catastrophic injuries, the reality for those who do survive is that they may require extensive physical, hands-on care for many years to come. In addition to physical impacts, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are prevalent in the Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veteran populations, which poses tremendous daily challenges for the veteran and his or her entire family.     Stark cultures exist between the military and art therapy. The military — an institution and culture of rigid protocol, disciplined training, mission-focus; and art therapy — a profession based in creativity and the therapeutic relationship, within a fluid and flexible approach that offers myriad ways to openly express one’s feelings and thoughts. Yet many who serve in the military are finding art therapy to ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Creativity Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Stress Trauma art Art Therapy drama Music Neuroplasticity Poetry Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Traumatic Brain Injury veterans War Veteran Source Type: news

Related Links:

DiscussionThis trial will be the first randomised controlled trial to examine sleep-enhancing treatment in trauma-affected refugees, as well as the first trial to investigate the effect of IRT and mianserin in this population. Therefore, this trial may optimise treatment recommendations for sleep disturbances in trauma-affected refugees. Based on our findings, we expect to discuss the effect of treatment, focussing on sleep disturbances. Furthermore, the results will provide new information regarding the association between sleep disturbances, PTSD symptoms, psychosocial functioning and quality of life in trauma-affected r...
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conclusion. A review of the literature suggests that there are adequate data supporting the efficacy and general safety of the low-dose use of trazodone for the treatment of insomnia. keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;14(9–10):24–34 Introduction Insomnia is characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking too early1 and is associated with significant impairments in daytime activities, which might occur despite adequate opportunities for sleep.2–6 Primary insom...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review hypnotics insomnia sedative trazodone treatment Source Type: research
If you’re a new mom, you probably hear about postpartum depression all the time. There are articles galore to be read. You’ve memorized all the warning signs. But if you regularly get flashbacks to traumatic moments in the delivery room, don’t like to talk about giving birth because it’s painful for you, and have symptoms of anxiety, you might actually be experiencing postpartum PTSD. This is not the same thing as postpartum depression. You may not have heard of postpartum PTSD. I hadn’t. I wasn’t diagnosed until I was 15 months postpartum. Postpartum depression is more widely known &mda...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
How do I know that I’m suffering from the sequelae of a traumatic event? Trauma happens. It happens in everyday life. If not discharged properly it sleeps in our bodies and in our souls. When it sleeps, it morphs and over time the symptoms of which become far removed from the trauma of origin, so much so we might not identify the connection. Without that connection, symptoms cannot truly resolve. That is the course of the aftermath of a traumatic moment or event. If you agree that we are comprised of energy and matter, then you will understand that trauma is in our bodies and in our souls. How does trauma create symp...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: PTSD Spirituality Trauma Avoidance constriction Fight or Flight Hyperarousal Hypervigilance Isolation Nervous System Post-concussion syndrome posttraumatic stress Psychological trauma Source Type: news
For decades, Monique Barry was tortured by incessant anxiety (her daughter’s rough day at school? proof the child’s life was ruined) and baseless guilt (choosing a bad restaurant? a hanging offense!). Then she learned that her garden-variety neuroses might be something else: the trauma of her ancestors, passed down through the generations.   Nobody likes me, said my daughter, Elyse, inhaling dry cereal as she bopped to Taylor Swift on the car radio. It was the end of her first week at a new school. “I’m sure that’s not true,” I said, gripping the steering wheel. My heart rattled. My...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
November is National Family Caregivers Month and to mark the occasion, HuffPost50 published a callout in September from our editor-at-large Rita Wilson seeking stories of inspiring caregivers. We were inundated with submissions, some from family members and some from the caregivers themselves. In this second installment of a two-part series titled Unsung Heroes: The Faces Of Caregiving In America Today, you’ll read about five of the many people across the country who put their own lives on pause to tend to friends and family members who have fallen ill. Another five caregivers were profiled last week. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
My almost life-long companion and I are actually breaking up. I should be more specific. What I’m breaking up with is more exactly known as C-PTSD, a form of PTSD. I think we’re in the final stages of our separation. It’s been a long and drawn-out breakup because that’s how it goes with C-PTSD. Once you get to know it well, you practice breaking up with it every day. Some days require more sorting out and negotiation than others. It’s been around a long time for me. My children have all become very familiar with it even though they didn’t know what they’re really seeing. Most peopl...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Inspiration & Hope Men's Issues Personal Self-Esteem Trauma Women's Issues C-PTSD Complex post-traumatic stress disorder complex PTSD Complex trauma Domestic Abuse Domestic Violence Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS The urge to do something to help in an international medical crisis is understandable and admirable, but the adverse impacts reported by participants here – at every stage of deployment, suggest that preparedness for these missions needs improvement and at the very least, high risk missions should be limited to more seasoned and well trained (for conditions in the field) personnel. While volunteering for a medical mission during a health crisis can be very rewarding, both professionally and personally, it can also be very disruptive and impactful. All volunteers for high risk missions must be made fully a...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Most days, I still don't think that I look much like someone with PTSD. This is an odd thought whenever I interrogate it: I look like myself, my self has PTSD -- ipso facto, if A=B, B=C, then A=C -- I look like someone with PTSD. But it's still hard for me to see. Before the acronym was assigned to me, and sometimes even now, after a few years of conceiving of it as an intrinsic part of me -- the P-T-S and Ds coiling around the G-C-T and As of my DNA strands, I've imagined -- my predominant association was with combat, with Saving Private Ryan. I would think of the scene in The Hurt Locker where the soldier-protagonist st...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Most people experience feelings of anxiety before an important event such as a big exam, business presentation, or first date. These are normal feelings of anxiety that nearly everyone experiences from time to time in their lives. Anxiety disorders, however, are conditions that fill a person’s life with overwhelming anxiety and fear. This fear is chronic, unremitting, and can grow progressively worse. Tormented by panic attacks, obsessive thoughts, flashbacks, nightmares, or countless frightening physical symptoms, some people with anxiety disorders even become housebound. How Common Are Anxiety Disorders? People wi...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Disorders General Panic Disorder Anxiety Disorders facts about anxiety Panic Attack Separation Anxiety Disorder Specific phobia Source Type: news
More News: Afghanistan Health | Anxiety | Brain | Child Development | Children | Environmental Health | Iraq Health | Learning | Men | Middle East Health | Neurology | Nightmares | Pain | Post Traumatic Stress Disorder | Psychiatry | Psychology | Psychotherapy | Study | Training | Universities & Medical Training | Women