Promising Drug Reduces Growth of Aggressive Mesothelioma

Scientists in Italy have found a platinum-based drug that successfully lessens growth of the most aggressive type of mesothelioma cancer cells. Researchers at the University of Salento discovered the experimental drug Ptac2S was more effective in reducing the spread of sarcomatoid malignant pleural mesothelioma cells in mice compared to cisplatin — the most widely used chemotherapy drug for treating mesothelioma. Sarcomatoid is the least common of the three mesothelioma cell types but is considered more aggressive and harder to treat. A diagnosis with the sarcomatoid cell type is typically associated with a poor prognosis. In the Italian study, Ptac2S reduced the growth rate of sarcomatoid cells up to 50 percent and decreased tumor mass by 53 percent. Lab mice treated with cisplatin showed just a 12 percent tumor mass reduction. Previous research showed Ptac2S was 12 times more effective than cisplatin in reducing the growth of epithelioid cells, which account for approximately 50 percent of all diagnosed cases of mesothelioma. Biphasic cells — a combination of epithelioid and sarcomatoid — represents roughly 35 percent of all cases. “Results confirm that Ptac2S is a promising therapeutic agent for malignant mesothelioma, giving a substantial starting point for its further validation,” lead researcher Antonella Muscella wrote in the study. Need for Increased Efficacy of Chemotherapy Currently, the standard of care for treating malignant mesoth...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Alimta alternatives to cisplatin Antonella Muscella Biphasic mesothelioma chemotherapy for mesothelioma chemotherapy resistance DNA adducts epithelioid mesothelioma genomic activities mesothelioma clinical trials mesothelioma survival Source Type: news

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Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City has opened its latest clinical trial for patients with pleural mesothelioma, studying the effectiveness of an immunotherapy and chemotherapy combination prior to aggressive surgery. The novel feasibility study will determine if the use of Opdivo (nivolumab) with Alimta (pemetrexed) and either cisplatin or carboplatin — without delaying scheduled surgery — can significantly extend patient survival time. The hope is to duplicate earlier effectiveness of that same combination with other cancers. “It has been tried with promising results,” Memorial...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
A promising and expensive type of immunotherapy, called CAR T-cell therapy, is now covered by Medicare. This news may affect mesothelioma patients in the future. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell, or CAR T-cell, therapy involves the laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s T cells, which are a type of white blood cell responsible for protecting the body against infection and disease. The T cells are genetically modified to better recognize and attack cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the immunotherapy procedure for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2019; 40: 347-360 DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1693406Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare cancer associated with asbestos exposure and portends a dismal prognosis. Its worldwide incidence has been increasing, and treatment options are currently suboptimal and noncurative. However, since the turn of the century, several encouraging steps have been made toward improving outcomes for mesothelioma patients. An increased understanding of disease pathophysiology has led to more accurate diagnosis and staging, and the establishment of the standard of care first-line pemetrexed/platin doublet chemotherapy re...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
The Princess Margaret Cancer Center in Toronto has moved from SMART to SMARTER with the recent launch of its latest clinical trial for pleural mesothelioma patients. SMARTER is the acronym for Surgery for Mesothelioma After Radiation Therapy using Extensive pleural Resection, which also describes the latest clinical trial. The phase I clinical trial is an unconventional approach to treatment of mesothelioma: Find the maximum tolerated dosage of hypofractionated radiation to stimulate the immune system before aggressive surgery. It comes on the heels of the SMART protocol, which stands for Surgery for Mesothelioma After Rad...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Prophylactic radiotherapy — once offered routinely after invasive procedures for pleural mesothelioma — is an unnecessary treatment for patients, according to the most recent study from the United Kingdom. Results from a large, multicenter clinical trial have shown the treatment — used regularly for almost two decades — does little to prevent chest-wall metastasis that can occur with mesothelioma cancer. “This should be helpful for patients to know if their oncologist is offering something they don’t really need,” clinical oncologist Dr. Neil Bayman, associate medical director at t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Too many patients with pleural mesothelioma are going without treatment recommended by National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, according to a recent study at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Valuable survival time is being lost. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery published the study that looked at disparities in compliance with national treatment guidelines and their impact on overall survival. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network, along with the American Society of Clinical Oncology, recommends multimodal therapy — surgery, chemotherapy and possibly radiation therapy — for mesothelioma pa...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
A novel radiotherapy regimen can double the chances of surviving two or more years with pleural mesothelioma, according to Dr. Marco Trovo at University Hospital of Udine in Italy. Trovo is the lead author of a study involving 108 patients treated for malignant mesothelioma between 2014 and 2018 at the National Cancer Institute in Aviano, Italy. He presented the findings this week at the annual European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology convention in Milan. “Radiotherapy has evolved dramatically in the last few years, so we wanted to see if it could now be used to prevent cancer from spreading to nearby ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare thoracic solid tumor cancer that has been strongly linked to asbestos exposure. It has a long latency period of at least 20-30 years following exposure, and global incidence is still increasing in countries where asbestos is still in use. Surgical resection for patients with early stage MPM is considered standard therapy and radiation therapy offers only palliative benefit. For patients with advanced disease, combination chemotherapy with Cisplatin and Pemetrexed results in improvement in survival and quality of life, thus constituting the “standard of care”.
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Researchers at Osaka University in Japan have identified a key component of physical health associated with response to immunotherapy drugs. Among people with non-small cell lung cancer, higher levels of muscle mass predicted a better response to PD-1 inhibitor immunotherapy. Sarcopenia — the term used to describe low muscle mass levels — appears to reduce the benefits a person receives from immunotherapy cancer treatment. “Sarcopenia at baseline is a significant predictor of worse outcome in patients with advanced NSCLC [non-small cell lung cancer] receiving PD-1 blockade,” the study investigators ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Intraoperative photodynamic therapy combined with novel proton radiation improved survival time significantly for recent patients with advanced-stage pleural mesothelioma. The study — the first to measure the impact of this combination — involved 10 consecutive patients treated at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center. The treatment regimen resulted in a 90 percent, two-year disease control rate and an impressive 30.3-month median overall survival from the time of diagnosis. All 10 patients were diagnosed before treatment began with stage 3 or stage 4 disease, which typically results in ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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