New Report Releases Strategies to Reduce Opioid Epidemic

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recently released a report, requested by the United States Food and Drug Administration, that highlights what can be done to stop the opioid use disorder and other opioid-related harms without closing access to opioids for patients who need them. The committee that conducted the study and wrote the report recommended actions the FDA, other federal agencies, state and local governments, and health-related organizations should take – which include promoting more cautious prescribing of opioids, expanding access to treatment for opioid use disorder, preventing more overdose deaths, weighing societal impacts in opioid-related regulatory decisions, and investing in research to better understand the nature of pain and develop non-addictive alternatives. In more recent years, national initiatives to reduce opioid prescribing have modestly decreased the number of prescription opioids dispensed. Unfortunately, many people who otherwise would have been using prescription opioids have transitioned to heroin use. According to the report, the declining price of heroin, together with regulatory efforts designed to reduce harms associated with the use of prescription opioids – including the availability of abuse-deterrent formulations – may be contributing to increased heroin use. One approach to addressing the opioid epidemic is to have a fundamental shift in the nation’s approach to prescribing p...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs

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Cliffside Malibu does not condone the use of the term “addict” when referring to people suffering from the disorder of addiction. However, we do understand that others still may use the term in order to find information. Many people may find themselves asking the question, “am I an opioid addict?” if they feel as if their use has spiraled out of control. There are many ways to find out if you may have become addicted to opioids, as well as ways to get help and find treatment. How Opioid Addiction Begins Nearly 80% of heroin users started with prescription opioids, which puts prescription drugs and ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals addiction treatment opioid opioid crisis opioids pharmaceutical addiction pharmaceutical drug abuse treatment Source Type: blogs
On average, 130 Americans die from an opioid overdose every day. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers opioid overdose an epidemic in the United States, estimating it responsible for nearly 68 percent of 70,000 drug-related deaths in 2017. Understanding the effects of opioids can prevent opioid overdose, and knowing the opioid overdose signs can save lives. What Are Opioids? Opioids are a class of drugs naturally found in the opium poppy plant. Opioid drugs reduce pain by binding to opioid receptors in your brain, spinal cord and other areas of the body, creating morphine-like effects. The CDC ide...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Heroin Painkiller Substance Abuse drug overdose opiate opiate abuse opiate addiction opiates opioid opioids Source Type: blogs
Zach (left) and Bob (right) According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than 70,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2017, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids, a two-fold increase in a decade. Opioids include prescription opioids and methadone, heroin, and other synthetic narcotics like fentanyl. Bob Paff has directly suffered the casualties of this epidemic. On January 21 of this year he lost his son Zach to an accidental overdose of fentanyl. A highly sought-after communications expert, business leader, and internationally recognized author, Bob now uses his communications platform to bring ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Recovery Stigma Opioid Epidemic Opioids Suicide synthetic fentanyl Source Type: blogs
What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs
We  learned last week that the 2017 drug overdose numbers reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clearly show most opioid-related deaths are due to illicit fentanyl and heroin, while deaths due to prescription opioids have stabilized, continuing a steady trend for the past several years. I’ve encouraged using the term “Fentanyl Crisis” rather than “Opioid Crisis” to describe the situation, because it more accurately points to its cause—nonmedical users accessing drugs in the dangerous black market fueled by drug prohibition—hoping thi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
“Drugs are a waste of time. They destroy your memory and your self-respect and everything that goes along with your self-esteem.” – Kurt Cobain I grew up in a close-knit, fairly religious family where children were seen and not heard, where mealtime meant everyone sat down together and exchanged pleasantries while enjoying the prepared-at-home repasts, complete with dessert. There was no distraction, either from television or radio, and the telephone ringing was a rare occurrence, quickly dispatched once the caller learned we were eating. In fact, nothing was so urgent back then. It was, indeed, a peacefu...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Alcoholism Drug Abuse Opioid Addiction Source Type: news
I didn’t vote for you. You see, I was born with a brain injury. Doctors at Children’s Hospital in Boston told my parents I would never be able to walk normally. Young children are mean. As a young boy, insults, and laughs became a daily ritual. When I walked into a classroom, a restaurant, or down a street, people didn’t look into my eyes. They always looked down as I limped awkwardly along. But I overcame and became a varsity athlete at a prep school outside of Boston. As a teenager, I grew strong, and anybody that made fun of my limp or my awkward gate became irrelevant. Frankly, Mr. President, the day ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The Unites States of America is facing the worst health care crisis of our nation’s history. Over the past two-year period, more Americans died of opiate addiction than died in the entire Vietnam War. Drug overdoses now cause more deaths than gun violence and car crashes. In fact, accidental opioid overdoses are responsible for more deaths in 2015 than HIV/AIDS did at the height of the epidemic in 1995. However, the AIDS epidemic can be the blueprint for the United States approach to the opioid epidemic. Once America became mobilized against AIDS, Congress orchestrated intensive efforts devoted to training and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Mr. President, what in God’s name are you doing? Your Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, has turned the clock back in our country almost 35 years. Our nation’s heroin epidemic is a health crisis and will never be solved with a lock-’em-up-and-throw-away-the-key solution. Despite all intelligent research leading to a mandate conclusion that incarceration will not ever diminish drug addiction and the radical negative effects it has on our economy, “My Favorite Martian,” Jeff Sessions, has just ordered federal prosecutors to chase far harsher sentences against drug-addict-criminals. Mr. Trump, who ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The CDC recently put out apaperin their Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) that studied the likelihood of long term opiate use after initial treatment with an opioid medication for acute pain. The results, for me as a regular prescriber of opioid medications, were fairly shocking. The study randomly reviewed 10% of patient records from the Lifelink database over the time period of 2006-2015. If a patient was given a prescription for an opioid for longer than 10 days, there was a 1 in 5 chance that patient would be a regular opiate user one year later. That's just staggering.Few are unaware of ...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: blogs
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