Healthcare costs for allergic rhinitis patients on allergy immunotherapy: a retrospective observational study.

The objective of this study was to compare healthcare costs and resource utilization for patients with AR who received SCIT compared with those who discontinued SCIT shortly after initiation. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study evaluated medical and pharmacy claims from the Optum Research Database from January 2009 through February 2014 for adults and pediatric patients with>7 (continuers) vs ≤7 (discontinuers) injection visits for SCIT within 60 days of initiation. RESULTS: After 1:1 propensity score matching, each cohort included 6,710 patients. Continuers were less likely than discontinuers to use oral corticosteroids (27.7% vs 29.6%, P = 0.018), or to have ≥1 respiratory-related emergency room visit (5.4% vs 6.5%, P = 0.008) and ≥1 inpatient stay (1.1% vs 1.7%; P = 0.002). Continuers were more likely than discontinuers to have ≥1 AR-related office (98.8% vs 94.6%, P
Source: Current Medical Research and Opinion - Category: Research Tags: Curr Med Res Opin Source Type: research

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AbstractPurpose of RevieswLocal respiratory allergy (LRA) is an eosinophilic phenotype of chronic airway disease. Three entities have been described within the LRA spectrum: local allergic rhinitis (LAR) and local allergic asthma (LAA) in non-atopic patients, and dual allergic rhinitis (DAR) in atopic patients (coexistence of LAR and allergic rhinitis). In this article, we aim to review the current evidence on the therapeutic options for LRA.Recent FindingsNo controlled study has assessed the effect of standard therapy (oral antihistamines, intranasal or inhaled corticosteroids, bronchodilators) in LRA subjects. Three rand...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Subcutaneous immunotherapy is effective for treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and chronic rhinosinusitis. Rapid desensitization (rush immunotherapy) offers advantages of faster efficacy, improved compliance, and  cost effectiveness. While premedication with corticosteroids and antihistamines substantially reduce the incidence of systemic reactions, safety is the primary concern for allergists.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Treatments for perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) include antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids [INCS], leukotriene receptor antagonists, and allergen immunotherapy (AIT). This meta-analysis systematically evaluated the efficacy of pharmacotherapy and AIT versus placebo on nasal symptoms associated with PAR.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Approximately 30% of the Japanese population has Japanese cedar (JC) pollinosis, an allergic response involving sneezing, pruritus, rhinorrhea, and nasal obstruction, all of which greatly affect the patient's quality of life.1 Treatment of JC pollinosis is similar to that for other types of pollinosis and often involves antihistamine and nasal corticosteroids. Although these treatments provide symptomatic relief, they do not modify or cure the disease. In contrast, allergen-specific immunotherapy changes the course of disease,2 and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is considered a safer and more efficient treatment for aller...
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewIn this article, we review the impact and the treatment of sleep disturbance caused by allergic rhinitis (AR) in adult and pediatric patients.Recent FindingsAlthough intranasal corticosteroids (INS) remain the mainstay treatments for AR-induced sleep disturbance, allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been suggested to be effective in altering the course and progression of moderate-to-severe AR that is refractory to pharmacotherapy. MP-AzeFlu is a recently developed formulation containing azelastine, an intranasal antihistamine (INAH), and fluticasone propionate, an INS. MP-AzeFlu has been reported to ha...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTo evaluate the impact of allergic rhinitis (AR) on the development of asthma and to update readers on recent literature suggesting that early treatment of allergic subjects with immunotherapy may prevent asthma onset.Recent FindingsAR is frequently associated with asthma, leading to the concept that these two conditions are different aspects of the same disease. There is increasing evidence that AR precedes the onset of asthmatic symptoms and current treatment strategies are beneficial in symptom control with no impact prevention. There is limited knowledge about the risk factors responsible for t...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Standardised subcutaneous immunotherapy has long-term efficacy for children with persistent allergic rhinitis. Single-allergen subcutaneous immunotherapy was appropriate for allergic rhinitis caused by multiple allergens, including house dust mites, in the paediatric population. PMID: 29374499 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Laryngol Otol Source Type: research
Conventional immunotherapy is effective for treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and chronic rhinosinusitis. Rapid desensitization (rush immunotherapy) offers advantages of faster efficacy, improved compliance, and cost effectiveness. While premedication with corticosteroids and antihistamines substantially reduce the incidence of systemic reactions, safety remains the primary concern for this procedure.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract This is an updated guideline for the diagnosis and management of allergic and non‐allergic rhinitis, first published in 2007. It was produced by the Standards of Care Committee of the British Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, using accredited methods. Allergic rhinitis is common and affects 10–15% of children and 26% of adults in the UK, it affects quality of life, school and work attendance, and is a risk factor for development of asthma. Allergic rhinitis is diagnosed by history and examination, supported by specific allergy tests. Topical nasal corticosteroids are the treatment of choice for m...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: BSACI GUIDELINES Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 3 July 2017 Source:European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases Author(s): G. Mortuaire, J. Michel, J.F. Papon, O. Malard, D. Ebbo, L. Crampette, R. Jankowski, A. Coste, E. Serrano Allergic rhinitis is a common condition, with significant impact on quality of life depending on severity and quality of control. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is the only known treatment able to alter the natural course of allergic rhinitis. Although well known to allergologists, it has yet to be fully adopted by the ENT community. This review, based on the most recent meta-...
Source: European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
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