Medical News Today: Acupuncture is effective for relieving period pain

Manual acupuncture is effective in treating period pain and associated symptoms, such as nausea and headaches, according to the results of new research.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Complementary Medicine / Alternative Medicine Source Type: news

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In this study, we conducted a cross-sectional survey among 419 acupuncturists nation-wide to investigate the top 10 and top 99 acupuncture indications in private clinics in the United States. We found the top 10 indications to be: lower back pain, depression, anxiety, headache, arthritis, allergies, general pain, female infertility, insomnia, neck pain and frozen shoulder. Among the top 99 indications, pain represents the largest category; and mental health management, especially for mood disorders, is in greatest demand. The following popular groups are: immune system dysfunctions, gastrointestinal diseases, gynecology an...
Source: The American Journal of Chinese Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Chin Med Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 September 2018Source: World Journal of Acupuncture - MoxibustionAuthor(s): Abdurachman, Krisnawan Andy Pradana, Hamzah, Hendy HendartoAbstractThe patient with dysmenorrhea was treated by needling at Tàichōng (太冲 LR 3) , 4 times of treatment was given and the nausea, migraine and pain scale of the patient were alleviated and finally disappeared. Until the next two menstrual period, patient didn't have similar complaints. The author recommended for other acupuncturists to utilize LR 3 as complementary therapy for relieving pain at primary dysmenorrhea.
Source: World Journal of Acupuncture Moxibustion - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion: Acupuncture therapy in Liv3 effectively helps to relieve pain at dysmenorrhea.
Source: World Journal of Acupuncture Moxibustion - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
It is easy to ridicule a 2000-year-old treatment that can seem closer to magic than to science. Indeed, from the 1970s to around 2005, the skeptic’s point of view was understandable, because the scientific evidence to show that acupuncture worked, and why, was weak, and clinical trials were small and of poor quality. But things have changed since then. A lot. Thanks to the development of valid placebo controls (for example, a retractable “sham” device that looks like an acupuncture needle but does not penetrate the skin), and the publication of several large and well-designed clinical trials in the last d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs
This article offers a brief critical review of integrative medical therapies used to treat chronic pain, including nutritional supplements, yoga, relaxation, tai chi, massage, spinal manipulation, and acupuncture. The goal of this article is to identify those treatments that show evidence of efficacy and to identify gaps in the literature where additional studies and controlled trials are needed. An electronic search of the databases of PubMed, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Science Citation Index Expanded was conducted. Overall, weak positive evidence was found for yoga, relaxation, tai chi, massage, and mani...
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
For whatever reason, acupuncturists and acupuncture believers think that acupuncture can be useful in emergency situations. They even do studies purporting to show that. This is yet another of such a clinical trial, albeit larger than usual. Guess what? It doesn't really show what it's advertised to show.
Source: Respectful Insolence - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture ankle sprain emergency room low back pain migraine quackademic medicine Source Type: blogs
Acupuncture is a treatment that dates back to around 100 BC in China. It is based on traditional Chinese concepts such as qi (pronounced “chee” and considered life force energy) and meridians (paths through which qi flows). Multiple studies have failed to demonstrate any scientific evidence supporting such principles. Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin needles into the skin at multiple, varying locations based on the patient’s symptoms. Once inserted, some acupuncturists hand turn the needles for added therapeutic benefit. Although there are many uses for acupuncture in traditional Chinese medicin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs
According to this article: * Acupuncture, yoga, and other complementary approaches to health care may be helpful in treating certain types of chronic pain, including back pain, osteoarthritis, and headaches. * No serious adverse effects were found with any of the complementary approaches studied.
Source: AJN - Category: Nursing Tags: Journal Watch Source Type: research
The nation's crisis in pain treatment and need to reduce opioid dependence has lifted a powerful chorus of voices to change insurance practices. The American Medical Association is among the organizations urging payers to cover non-pharmacological approaches. Many specifically extend this call to integrative treatments. The statements were discovered by representatives of the Acupuncture Now Foundation (ANF) and the American Society of Acupuncturists (ASA) among comments submitted to the USA Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDC had a public comment period prior to its March 2016 issuance of its Guidelines ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion. EA pretreatment exerts antinociceptive effects in a rat model of recurrent migraine, possibly via modulation of the serotonin system. PMID: 27843474 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
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