New pacemaker offers heart failure hope

ConclusionThis laboratory research describes the complex design and animal testing of an ACPG that aims to restore the natural synchronisation of the heart rate with the breathing pattern. Naturally in the body, our heart rate alters slightly as we breathe in and out (RSA). In people with heart failure (a disease process with many causes, where the heart is unable to pump enough blood to meet the body’s demands), RSA is described as being "lost", and previous research has suggested this to be a prognostic indicator for poor outcome.This research described the development of an ACPG and its testing in rats. The generator received incoming signals from the phrenic connected to the diaphragm, and then produced voltage oscillations that stimulated the vagus nerve, which controls heart rate. The results were promising, demonstrating that the technology was able to coordinate the heart rate with breathing pattern. The heart rate varied, depending on the stage during breathing that the vagus nerve was stimulated. When stimulated during the inspiratory phase, it decreased heart rate by around 50% of the normal rate, but had little effect on heart rate during the late expiratory phase. Overall, this technique shows promise, but having only so far been tested in rats in the laboratory, it is far too early to tell if and when it will be developed for testing in humans and, importantly, whether it would actually have any effect on health outcomes.We expect that further an...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

Related Links:

ConclusionPatients who are at risk for SCA are patients who have had a cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation (VF) or sustained ventricular tachycardia (SVT), those with familial or inherited condition with sudden cardiac arrest risk, myocardial infarction with an ejection fraction (EF) of less than or equal to 35%, dilated cardiomyopathy (including NICM), with an EF of less than or equal to 35%, ICD explanations, and other conditions with high risk of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or VF are candidates for the WCD.The sample of data was from 186 patients. However, more patients were likely candidates but may not hav...
Source: Heart and Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
We examined associations between physical activity and seven major CVD death causes. The sample comprised 65,093 adults (aged 58  ± 12 years, 45.4% men) followed up over mean [SD] 9.4 ± 4.5 years, recruited from The Health Survey for England and the Scottish Health Surveys. A CVD diagnosis was reported in 9.2% of the sample at baseline. Physical activity was self-reported. Outcomes were subtypes of CVD death; acut e myocardial infarction; chronic ischaemic heart disease; pulmonary heart disease; a composite of cardiac arrest, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death; heart f...
Source: European Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTreatment with a defibrillator can reduce the risk of sudden death by terminating ventricular arrhythmias. The identification of patient groups in whom this function reduces overall mortality is challenging. In this review, we summarise the evidence for who benefits from a defibrillator.Recent FindingsRecent evidence suggests that contemporary pharmacologic and non-defibrillator device therapies are altering the potential risks and benefits of a defibrillator.SummaryWho benefits from a defibrillator is determined by both the risk of sudden death and the competing risk of other, non-sudden causes of...
Source: Current Heart Failure Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common human arrhythmia. Interventional treatment with catheter ablation is meanwhile an established technique that is increasingly applied and has become one of the main treatment modalities in patients with AF. Ablation results in significant improvement of symptoms and quality of life. There is up to now no clear evidence of an impact of the procedure on hard clinical endpoints except in patients with heart failure who seem to benefit significantly from ablation. Cornerstone of the procedure is achievement of pulmonary vein isolation. Radiofrequency energy is the ma...
Source: Polish Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Kardiol Pol Source Type: research
Authors: Cases A, Gorriz JL Abstract Hyperkalemia is one of the most common electrolyte disturbances, especially among some groups of patients, such as in those with chronic kidney disease, diabetes or heart failure. Hyperkalemia has been associated with increased risks of mortality, arrhythmias, hospitalization and costs, as well as the need to down titrate/discontinue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASIs), despite their well-known cardiovascular and nephroprotective benefits. Current potassium binders have limitations (slow onset of action, limited selectivity for potassium binding, risk of dru...
Source: Drugs of Today - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drugs Today (Barc) Source Type: research
A miniaturized and programmable pacemaker for mice demonstrates the feasibility of long-term cardiac pacing to study cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure.
Source: Science Translational Medicine - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Editors ' Choice Source Type: research
Jonas Skogestad, Jan Magnus Aronsen
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology, Volume 34, Issue 11Author(s): Alexandre Raymond-Paquin, Stanley Nattel, Reza Wakili, Rafik TadrosAbstractArrhythmia-induced cardiomyopathy (AIC) is characterized by left ventricular systolic dysfunction for which the primary cause is arrhythmia. The hallmark of AIC is its reversibility once the arrhythmia is properly controlled. Any tachyarrhythmia can potentially cause AIC (often called “tachycardiomyopathy”), with atrial fibrillation (AF) being by far the most common in clinical practice. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AIC ne...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Authors: Dumitru A, Radu BM, Radu M, Cretoiu SM Abstract Muscle atrophy typically is a direct effect of protein degradation induced by a diversity of pathophysiologic states such as disuse, immobilization, denervation, aging, sepsis, cachexia, glucocorticoid treatment, hereditary muscular disorders, cancer, diabetes and obesity, kidney and heart failure, and others. Muscle atrophy is defined by changes in the muscles, consisting in shrinkage of myofibers, changes in the types of fiber and myosin isoforms, and a net loss of cytoplasm, organelles and overall a protein loss. Although in the literature there are extens...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
ConclusionIn a large series of CS subjects, rates of ventricular arrhythmia and heart failure events remain high with no treatment regimen clearly associated with better outcome. Patients with cardiomyopathy at diagnosis were more likely to reach the composite endpoint.
Source: European Journal of Heart Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
More News: Anesthesia | Anesthesiology | Arrhythmia | Brain | Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Chemistry | Education | Electrocardiogram | Health | Heart | Heart Failure | Heart Transplant | Laboratory Medicine | Lung Transplant | Neurology | Neuroscience | Respiratory Medicine | Science | Study | Universities | Universities & Medical Training