A gunshot destroyed her face. A rare surgery just gave her a new one.

A gunshot wound to the face left a teenager with so much damage that for years doctors knew plastic surgery could only help so much to give her back a regular life. In May, the now-21-year-old woman joined the small but growing ranks of face transplant recipients, doctors announced Tuesday. For the woman, now the youngest to receive […]Related:‘How did this happen to a 10-year-old?’: Child dies with heroin and fentanyl in his systemDiet drinks are associated with weight gain, new research suggestsWhy this adorable mouse is to blame for the spread of Lyme disease
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In this study, we found that TXNIP deficiency induces accelerated senescent phenotypes of mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells under high glucose condition and that the induction of cellular ROS or AKT activation is critical for cellular senescence. Our results also revealed that TXNIP inhibits AKT activity by a direct interaction, which is upregulated by high glucose and H2O2 treatment. In addition, TXNIP knockout mice exhibited an increase in glucose uptake and aging-associated phenotypes including a decrease in energy metabolism and induction of cellular senescence and aging-associated gene expression. We propose that...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
UggBeen trying to stamp out the awful reporting on the poop doping claims of Dr. Lauren Peterson. SeeIrresponsible reporting on "poop doping" from the Washington PostKudos to Bicycling Magazine for pedaling so so so much overselling of the microbiomeBut the crap keeps flowing. Here is the last - in the NY Post: Poop transplants are the final frontier in athletic doping | New York PostHere are some quotes from the story and my comments about them."The treatment helped her battle Lyme Disease, however, there was a downside."No evidence exists that this treatment helped her battle Lyme disea...
Source: The Tree of Life - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Went on a bit of a Twitter tirade last night. See more below[View the story "Irresponsible reporting on "poop doping" from The Washington Post #microbiomania" on Storify]The Washington Post story, by Marissa Payne, requires a log in but the article is now in other papers that are free onlineincluding the Denver Post here.It is just really bad reporting because the claims of one scientist are presented as facts without any scrutiny and these claims need lots of scrutiny.Recently this story was covered in Bicycling Magazine and Igave them an "overselling the microbiome" award for their reporting...
Source: The Tree of Life - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
A 33-year-old male with cystic fibrosis 220 days removed from bilateral lung transplantation presented with 1 week of intermittent fevers (maximum 102 °F), malaise, bilateral lower extremity edema, unintentional weight gain (8 pounds), and 2 days of dyspnea on exertion. His post-transplant course was complicated by persistent leukopenia with intermittent neutropenia attributed to his anti-rejection regimen of mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. On presentation, his temperature was 98.9°F, his heart rate was 84 beats per minute, his blood pressure was 148/83 mmHg, and he was breathing 20 times per minute with an o...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Communication to the Editor Source Type: research
If you're one of the more than 20 million Americans who suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), your doctor has probably told you there isn't much they can do for you. Mainstream medicine doesn't have a cure for CKD. What they do have is a lot of drugs to treat the symptoms of it. And most of the drugs will leave you worse off than before you started taking them… Like ESAs, which are prescribed to treat anemia caused by chronic kidney disease. These dangerous drugs can cause strokes, heart attacks, blood clots and seizures. And if your kidneys fail, your only options are dialysis or a kidney transplant...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
Last week, I mentioned the case of Dr. Neil Spector, whose long-undiagnosed Lyme Disease resulted in irreversible heart failure and ultimately, a heart transplant. Dr. Spector, author of Gone in a Heartbeat: A Physician's Search for True Healing, is the Sandra Coates Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University School of Medicine. As the Director of Developmental Therapeutics at the Duke Cancer Institute, he's a leader in applying translational research to the clinical development of molecularly targeted personalized cancer therapies. Here, Dr. Spector share...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
This week, hundreds of scientists from around the world are descending on Washington D.C. for a three-day summit on a new technique that has spurred a major genetic revolution. Thanks to a gene-editing technique called CRISPR-Cas9, it is now not only possible, but easy, cheap and fast, to change, delete or replace genes in any plant or animal, including people. The range of hypothetical ways CRISPR could change our lives is staggering -- from creating wheat that is invulnerable to mildew to curing the world’s most intractable diseases. Anything that has DNA, which is to say, every living thing on earth, can now be mo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Conclusions. Providers of alternative therapies commonly target patients who believe they have Lyme disease. The efficacy of these unconventional treatments for Lyme disease is not supported by scientific evidence, and in many cases they are potentially harmful.
Source: Clinical Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: ARTICLES AND COMMENTARIES Source Type: research
A 51-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of Churg-Strauss syndrome (in remission for 20 years)–associated mesangial glomerulonephritis and end-stage renal disease with a recent renal transplant and previously cured cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection who was on a tapering dose of tacrolimus presented with sudden onset of lower extremity numbness. Symptoms progressed to complete paraplegia and sensory loss over 24 hours. The following day, ascending paresis extended to bilateral upper extremities, with high thoracic sensory level and complete blindness. Initial MRI revealed contrast enhancement of bilateral prechiasmat...
Source: Neurology Neuroimmunology and Neuroinflammation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: EMG, Devic's syndrome, Optic neuritis; see Neuro-ophthalmology/Optic Nerve, Transverse myelitis, Autoimmune diseases Clinical/Scientific Notes Source Type: research
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