Private Parts II: More things parents of boys need to know

While it can be uncomfortable for parents to talk about issues with their son’s private parts, abnormalities in the testicles and scrotum are common and treatable. One of my favorite parts of my job is sitting down with anxious families and being able to make the uncomfortable comfortable for them. I hope I can do that for you here in this guide to the most common testicular abnormalities seen in young boys. 1.    Undescended testicles A baby boy should have two testicles down in the scrotum. The best time to examine your son is while he soaks in a warm bath. If you’re unable to see or feel both testicles, make an appointment with a pediatric urologist. If your son is diagnosed with an undescended testicle or cryptorchidism, we’ll observe him until he turns six months old. If at that point, the testicle hasn’t descended on its own, we’ll perform an orchiopexy to release the testicle from the attachments hindering its descent and tack it down in the scrotum so it can develop appropriately. Orchiopexy is an uncomplicated hour-long day surgery, so you can take your son home the same day as the procedure. Your son will be pretty comfortable after surgery and will fully recover within a month. He’ll be prescribed pain medications for a few days and restricted from activities like bike-riding for a few weeks. 2.    Testicular pain If your son complains of a swollen scrotum and sharp pain that may or may not...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Ask the Expert Health & Wellness Department of Urology Erin McNamara Source Type: news

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Daniel J. IkensonSome people talk about trade as though it were an end in itself. It ’s not. Trade is a means to an end.We trade so that we can specialize. We specialize so that we can produce more. We produce more so that we can consume and save more. That is how we create wealth and raise living standards. Just like electricity or machinery or expertise, trade is a tool we use to leverage our physical, mental, and creative abilities to obtain more efficiently more of the things we need and want. When we remove barriers to trade, we create greater scope for specialization, which means we can produce more v...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Authors: Annunziato J, Shor D, Parikh S Abstract Heterotopic ossification (HO) is excess bone growth in soft tissues, typically juxta-articular and interfascicular, with varying incidence. This excess bone growth has been well-documented in cases of traumatic amputation but less frequently observed in cases of nontraumatic amputation. Symptomatic heterotopic ossification usually includes pain during prosthetic use with management involving prosthetic adjustments for comfort. This atypical case highlights a patient with a nontraumatic amputation and a proximal-oriented large spur formation that was not painful with ...
Source: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: J Am Osteopath Assoc Source Type: research
Authors: Headman ZC, Matson MC, Schneider RP, Potter JL, Loguda-Summers DL, Bhatia S, Kondrashova T Abstract Context: Various forms of simulation-based training, including training models, increase training opportunities and help assess performance of a task. However, commercial training models for lumbar puncture and epidural procedures are costly. Objective: To assess medical students' and residents' perception of 3-dimensional (3D)-printed lumbar, cervical, and pelvic models for mastering joint injection techniques and to determine the utility of ultrasonography-guided needle procedure training. Methods:...
Source: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: J Am Osteopath Assoc Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The current study identified preoperative characteristics associated with an increased risk of reintervention. No preoperative characteristics had any significant interactions with EVT or surgical reconstruction. PMID: 32224557 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis - Category: Cardiology Tags: J Atheroscler Thromb Source Type: research
Purpose of review Macrophages play an important role in regulating homeostasis, kidney injury, repair, and tissue fibrogenesis. The present review will discuss recent advances that explore the novel subsets and functions of macrophage in the pathogenesis of kidney damage and hypertension. Recent findings Macrophages differentiate into a variety of subsets in microenvironment-dependent manner. Although the M1/M2 nomenclature is still applied in considering the pro-inflammatory versus anti-inflammatory effects of macrophages in kidney injury, novel, and accurate macrophage phenotypes are defined by flow cytometric marke...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: RENAL IMMUNOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY: Edited by Agnes B. Fogo Source Type: research
Purpose of review The recent years have been marked by the publication of several articles highlighting the pathophysiological role of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PEC) and refining their phenotypic heterogeneity. Recent findings The present review synthetizes recent findings on (i) the potential regenerative role of PEC in glomerular diseases, and (ii) the mechanisms and signaling of leading to PEC pathogenic involvement in crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Summary The debate is still open regarding the podocyte regenerative properties of PEC in glomerular ...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: RENAL IMMUNOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY: Edited by Agnes B. Fogo Source Type: research
Purpose of review Despite improvements in acute kidney injury (AKI) detection, therapeutic options to halt the progression of AKI to chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain limited. In this review, we focus on recent discoveries related to the pathophysiology of the AKI to CKD continuum, particularly involving the renal tubular epithelial cells, and also discuss related ongoing clinical trials. While our focus is on injured renal tubular epithelial cells as initiators of the cascade of events resulting in paracrine effects on other cells of the kidney, the summation of maladaptive responses from various kidney cell types ult...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: RENAL IMMUNOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY: Edited by Agnes B. Fogo Source Type: research
Purpose of review Several imaging modalities exist for the assessment of Peyronie's disease. However, comprehensive recommendations for using these objective modalities based on large-scale evidence-based studies do not yet exist. Our objective is to evaluate current imaging techniques and provide a model that we follow in our clinic in the workup and management of Peyronie's disease. Recent findings Computed tomography and radiography excellently visualize penile plaque calcifications, and MRI adeptly identifies plaques in complex locations, such as the corporal septum. Ultrasonography has extensive applications in p...
Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: GENDER MEDICINE, INFERTILITY AND ERECTILE FUNCTION: Edited by Ryan Flannigan and Ranjith Ramasamy Source Type: research
A powerful Instagram post is shedding light on the medical challenges that can follow childbirth and celebrating moms’ scars. Eighteen months ago, Kari Horn gave birth to her son via emergency C-section. Though becoming a parent has been a joyful experience for the Virginia mom, her postpartum journey involved umbilical hernias, more surgery and further complications. While recovering from these complications, Horn posted a striking photo of her abdomen on Instagram to share her story and remind other struggling moms that they are not alone. In the caption, Horn described her photo as one of “the part...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Discussion Varicoceles are caused by high venous back pressure which causes a tortuous dilatation of the testicular veins (pampiniform plexus) of the spermatic cord. They occur more on the left than right because the left renal vein has a higher pressure than the inferior vena cava which drain the left and right gonadal veins respectively. Varicoceles are not very common in young children (3% in
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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