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Space station project seeks to crystalize the means to counteract nerve poisons

(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) The microgravity conditions of the International Space Station (ISS) may hold the key to improving our understanding of how to combat toxic nerve agents such as sarin and VX. That is the hope of Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) project that is part of an initiative at the National Institutes of Health aimed at developing improved antidotes for chemical agents.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) The microgravity conditions of the International Space Station (ISS) may hold the key to improving our understanding of how to combat toxic nerve agents such as sarin and VX. That is the hope of Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats (CounterACT) project that is part of an initiative at the National Institutes of Health aimed at developing improved antidotes for chemical agents.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
An experimental antiplatelet drug has surprising bite. Based on a protein found in snake venom, the new drug prevented blood clotting in mice without causing excessive bleeding after an injury, according to research published Thursday in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology. The drug has yet to be tested in humans.Bleeding is a common side effect in the current crop of available antiplatelet drugs, which are usually prescribed for heart patients to prevent blood cells, called platelets, from clumping together and forming clots. Depending on where they occur, clots can lead to a stroke or heart atta...
Source: Medical Hemostat - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Source Type: blogs
Temperatures were in the 100s when Vanessa Dunn, a 29-year-old Los Angeles-based makeup artist, was driving back home to California from Virginia last summer. After hours on the road and drinking limited water, she was struck by a severe case of dehydration and heat stroke. ”I wasn’t drinking enough water because I didn’t want to stop to pee,” she says. When she finally pulled over for the night she felt light-headed, and she couldn’t keep food down when she tried to eat. She even threw up blood. ”I was in incredible pain, and dizzy,” she says. “[I went] to the ER, turned out...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Why did my brother warn me against reading this book? It’s so good! I thought to myself, as I quickly devoured the pages of JoJo Moyes bestseller titled Me Before You. It was an uplifting tale about a young man who rediscovers love and laughter after a devastating spinal cord injury left him in a dangerous pool of depression. Finding myself at times in my own, albeit more shallow, pool of depression, I knew this story was exactly what I needed to remind me that I could find meaning in my life after my stroke. As I continued reading, anticipating the feel-good happy ending with a girl saving the boy's life with the po...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
We have to talk about drugs. No, not illicit drugs, but medications used by doctors and patients. Plaintiff attorneys run ads on TV that fool people into thinking certain meds are bad. The current one I deal with is the clot-blocking drug rivaroxaban (Xarelto.) Before that, it was dabigatran (Pradaxa). If, or when, the makers of rivaroxaban settle a class action suit, you can bet apixaban (Eliquis) will be next. These ads are a problem because they use fear persuasion (see Scott Adams’ blog), and because they can induce patients to stop taking or not starting a beneficial medicine.  Lots of other medications suf...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: HBOT is associated with a lower mortality rate in patients with COP, especially in those who were younger than 20 years and those with acute respiratory failure. The results provide important references for decision making in the treatment of COP. PMID: 28427969 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Chest - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Chest Source Type: research
This study assessed the prevalence of grey hair in patients with coronary artery disease and whether it was an independent risk marker of disease. This was a prospective, observational study which included 545 adult men who underwent multi-slice computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography for suspected coronary artery disease. Patients were divided into subgroups according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease, and the amount of grey/white hair. The amount of grey hair was graded using the hair whitening score: 1 = pure black hair, 2 = black more than white, 3 = black equals white, 4 = white more t...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 276th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Vitamin C in Sepsis has been all over social media and the lay press as the “cure” for ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS These results indicated that the combined application of N-Butylphthalide and HBO could significantly improve the cognitive dysfunction of patients with DEACMP and have great clinical efficacy, which should be further studied. PMID: 28352069 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed a little over six years ago, it brought with it the promise of health insurance for all Americans. It also sought to begin to shift the paradigm for health care in this country, emphasizing value over volume, and recognizing the importance of prevention coupled with appropriate access to care. By now, it is well known that repealing the ACA could leave nearly 20 million Americans uninsured and simultaneously result in millions of job losses across the country. An associated cost that has been less discussed, but no less relevant, is what repeal could mean for the nation’s...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Costs and Spending Following the ACA Public Health Big Cities Health Coalition Community Health Prevention and Public Health Fund. Source Type: blogs
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