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The Stigma Of Addiction Is More Dangerous Than Drug Overdoses

People in recovery aren't feeding the stigma. It comes from people who don't understand addiction.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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To address the rising epidemic of opioid overdose deaths, advocates are taking a page from the war on "Big Tobacco." Correspondent Lee Cowan talks with Mississippi lawyer Mike Moore (the state's former Attorney General) and with Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, who both seek to make drug manufacturers legally liable for the increase in opioid addiction that has had deadly consequences.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
About 25 million people are in recovery from substance use disorder (SUD), while approximately 100 million people live in chronic pain. With our nation fixated on the estimated 60,000 opioid-related overdose deaths in 2016, you might expect the interests of both groups to be in conflict. Consider two anecdotes. Paul is living with chronic pain from a car accident nine years ago. His physician abruptly cut his opioid dosage even though he’d been stable. In his legislative testimony, he said, “While I understand [some] are happy to abuse medications, I’m not one of them … I’m well below my prev...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe opioid crisis most likely is the most profound public health crisis our nation has faced. In 2015 alone, 52,000 people died of drug overdoses, with over 30,000 of those people dying from opioid drugs. A recent community forum led by the Cleveland Clinic contrasted this yearly death rate with the loss of 58,000 American lives in 4  years of the Vietnam War. The present review describes the origins of this opioid epidemic and provides context for our present circumstances.Recent FindingsAlarmingly, the overwhelming majority of opioid abusers begin their addiction with prescription medication...
Source: Current Pain and Headache Reports - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion In a moment of rare bipartisanship, Committee members came together to agree that additional funding was needed to address the opioid crisis and provide opioid use disorder (OUD) sufferers with adequate anti-addiction resources. The bipartisanship ended, however, Democrats specifically criticized recent budget cuts by the administration and recommended that additional federal funding should be directed towards Medicaid and other health care institutions that work to support the families of opioid users.        Related StoriesHouse Holds Hearing on Opioid CrisisState of the ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
In its latest move to address the ongoing opioid addiction epidemic, Independence Blue Cross said Tuesday it is removing member cost sharing — effective March 1 — for injectable and nasal spray formulations of naloxone. Naloxone blocks the effects of opioids and reverses an overdose when administered in time. This drug – well-known as brand name Narcan, though it is also sold under other names – has been available in Pennsylvan ia without a written prescription, since October 2015, due to…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
Opioids are an essential class of drugs used in pain management. In recent years, complex mechanisms pertaining to their abusive use have prompted a deadly crisis which is unfolding in the United States. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated that 91 Americans lose their lives daily due to an overdose of opioid drugs. This public health crisis has inspired much apprehension even among Haitian diaspora in the United States. Although needed painkillers are notably lacking in developing countries, the fear of a similar path has led a high-profile personality to advise against their use in Haiti. Indeed, he...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Policy Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs
TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 -- An opioid addiction treatment program for Rhode Island prison inmates appears to have significantly reduced overdose deaths among those who are released, researchers say. The program screens all inmates for opioid...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
(Natural News) The opioid crisis has reached epidemic proportions in this country, with the number of deaths quadrupling since 2000, and around 115 people dying from overdoses each day. President Trump has declared the opioid crisis a national health emergency, and high schools across the country have started stocking up on the drug Narcan to...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Discussion at the hearing largely focused on the desire to pass bipartisan legislation to address the opioid crisis as well as to determine best practices to identify over-prescribers and reduce instances of fraud. Opening Statements Chairwoman Lynn Jenkins opened the hearing by highlighting statistics regarding rising opioid related overdose death rates in her home state of Kansas. She went on to state that the “immense cost opioids impose on society” have caused a loss of productivity and put undue burden on the U.S. economic system. To lessen this burden, Jenkins stressed the importance to provide Medicare...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Joshua Sharfstein in JAMA discusses the opioid abuse epidemic and what to do about it. This is an opinion piece that doesn't have references, but I can assure you that he is right on the facts. People with opioid addiction seldom succeed in maintaining long term recovery without what we call Medication Assisted Treatment. That means either methadone or buprenorphine, both of which are themselves opioids. As Sharfstein tell us, " Many still believe that those who take methadone or buprenorphine are'trading one addiction for another,'' in bondage,'or'taking a cop-out.'" People who are using these medications may fa...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
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