Does coffee make you live longer?

Conclusion This study, conducted on a large number of people across Europe, was backed up by similar findings in the US. It appears to show some association between people who drink higher amounts of coffee and a reduced risk of death. But the "potentially beneficial clinical implications" need to be considered carefully for a number of reasons: Although the analyses were adjusted for some confounding variables, there may be a number of other factors that differ between the groups that account for the differences in death, such as socioeconomic status, family history, other medical conditions, and use of medication to name a few. Participants with a range of illnesses, including cancer, heart disease, stroke or diabetes, were excluded from the study. These people may have different coffee habits from those included in the study, biasing the results. Coffee consumption was self-reported and might have been over or underestimated, leading to inaccuracies in the results. Coffee consumption was only assessed at one point in time – people's habits might vary greatly over days, months and years, so one snapshot might not give an accurate picture of lifelong coffee drinking habits. Combining different cut-off levels of coffee per country may lead to inaccurate results. Lots of analyses were carried out on a range of diseases, most of which weren't significant, and the likelihood of finding some significant results by chance would be fairly likely. T...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

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It is currently recognized that in addition to the major impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in females, HPV causes considerable disease in men at the genitals, anal canal, and oropharynx. Specifically, genital HPV infections may progress to genital warts and penile carcinoma. Although studies concerning the natural history of HPV infections and associated neoplasias have mainly focused on women, during the last 2 decades considerable attention has been given in further understanding these infections in men. The HIM (HPV infection in men) Study, the only prospective multicenter study of male HPV natural history,...
Source: Acta Cytologica - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Sexual intercourse is regarded as the primary route of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission. Reported rates of the genotype-specific genital concordance of HPV infection among heterosexual partners vary. Most studies have evaluated only male/female genital transmission, but lately, the oral region has gained interest because of a rising trend of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. Risk factors for type-specific concordance have been reported as an increasing number of younger couples, persistent HPV infection, higher frequency of sexual intercourse, rising number of spouse ’s lifetime sexual partners, and sexual ...
Source: Acta Cytologica - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: 21 February 2019Source: Cell, Volume 176, Issue 5Author(s): Shashi Gujar, John Bell, Jean-Simon DialloOncolytic viruses (OVs) preferentially infect and kill cancer cells without harming normal cells. OVs can revert cancer-associated immune suppression and initiate clinically meaningful antitumor immune responses. OVs and their resultant immunological events can act at both primary and metastatic sites. Thus, OVs can be exploited for cancer gene therapies and immunotherapies alone or in combination with other interventions, including immune checkpoint blockade.
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: 21 February 2019Source: Cell, Volume 176, Issue 5Author(s): Mary T. Joy, Einor Ben Assayag, Dalia Shabashov-Stone, Sigal Liraz-Zaltsman, Jose Mazzitelli, Marcela Arenas, Nora Abduljawad, Efrat Kliper, Amos D. Korczyn, Nikita S. Thareja, Efrat L. Kesner, Miou Zhou, Shan Huang, Tawnie K. Silva, Noomi Katz, Natan M. Bornstein, Alcino J. Silva, Esther Shohami, S. Thomas CarmichaelSummaryWe tested a newly described molecular memory system, CCR5 signaling, for its role in recovery after stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). CCR5 is uniquely expressed in cortical neurons after stroke. Post-stroke neuronal kno...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: 21 February 2019Source: Cell, Volume 176, Issue 5Author(s): Ting Fu, Sally Coulter, Eiji Yoshihara, Tae Gyu Oh, Sungsoon Fang, Fritz Cayabyab, Qiyun Zhu, Tong Zhang, Mathias Leblanc, Sihao Liu, Mingxiao He, Wanda Waizenegger, Emanuel Gasser, Bernd Schnabl, Annette R. Atkins, Ruth T. Yu, Rob Knight, Christopher Liddle, Michael Downes, Ronald M. EvansSummaryIncreased levels of intestinal bile acids (BAs) are a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we show that the convergence of dietary factors (high-fat diet) and dysregulated WNT signaling (APC mutation) alters BA profiles to drive malignant trans...
Source: Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Journal Name: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) Issue: Ahead of print
Source: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
CANCER symptoms vary depending on which part of the body is affected by a tumour. You could be at risk of deadly tumour signs if you notice this feeling in your teeth. It could be a warning sign of deadly mouth cancer. Should you see a doctor?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
PMID: 30784374 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Hand Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: J Hand Surg Eur Vol Source Type: research
Pop star-turned-vicar the Reverend Richard Coles had clinical depression at the age of 17.
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSION:: To conclude, the outcomes of radiocephalic arteriovenous fistulas created by nephrologists are at par with historic outcomes. PMID: 30784345 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
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