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Asbestos Type Has No Effect on Mesothelioma Latency Period

New research from scientists in Germany sheds more light on the unusually long latency period associated with mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. The study, published earlier this year in the European Respiratory Journal, is the first to track the presence of asbestos fibers in lung tissue over time. Mesothelioma has one of the longest latency periods of any cancer. It typically takes anywhere from 20 to 50 years after a person’s initial exposure to asbestos before symptoms arise. Using the German Mesothelioma Register, researchers at Ruhr-University Bochum discovered the volume of asbestos fibers in tissue does not decrease over time, regardless of the type of asbestos involved. Specifically, the concentration of chrysotile — the most common of the six types of asbestos — remained stable over time, despite some previous studies suggesting it may be easier for the body to rid itself of that particular type of the naturally occurring mineral. “Our results show that asbestos continues to be demonstrable in human lungs, that also chrysotile can be identified after many years, and that there is no significant reduction of asbestos fibre concentrations in lung tissues over time after exposure cessation,” lead researcher Inke Sabine Feder wrote in the study. “The unique benefit of the data presented here is to have a measured starting point of the asbestos fibre burden of the human lung tissue to compare later findings with.&rd...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: amosite amphibole asbestos exposure asbestos fiber burden asbestos fibers in lungs biopersistence of asbestos bronchoalveolar lavage Chrysotile asbestos Chrysotile asbestos fibers European Respiratory Journal German Mesothelioma Regist Source Type: news

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Yale University alumni are pushing again to revoke the honorary degree given to Swiss billionaire Stephan Ernst Schmidheiny, whose asbestos-filled factories in Italy were responsible for the deaths of more than 2,000 people. Schmidheiny, 70, was sentenced to 16 years in prison and fined $15 billion in 2012 by an Italian court that found him negligent in protecting employees and nearby residents from deadly asbestos-related diseases such as mesothelioma. Schmidheiny received his honorary degree from Yale in 1996. In 2014, the university dismissed efforts by the Italy-based Asbestos Victims and Relatives Association and seve...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Scientists at the Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC) at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel, two-agent immunotherapy combination that worked surprisingly well in animal models with malignant mesothelioma. The discovery has sparked new optimism for immunotherapy, which has struggled to provide consistently positive results with aggressive cancers such as mesothelioma. “This is the beginning of a new story of hope, a new combination of immunotherapy,” Dr. Mark Poznansky, director of the VIC and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, told Asbestos.com. “It worked quite well in a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: The main cause of MPE in our setting was lung cancer, followed by breast cancer, unknown primary and mesothelioma. Chemical pleurodesis was a viable palliative measure for MPE in this population. PMID: 29629675 [PubMed - in process]
Source: South African Medical Journal - Category: African Health Tags: S Afr Med J Source Type: research
If you have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, you’re likely seeking information and resources to learn more about the disease. A free one-hour mesothelioma teleconference is a great place to start. CancerCare recently hosted the “Advancements in the Treatment of Mesothelioma” workshop. The session featured five mesothelioma experts, including Dr. Hedy Kindler, director of the mesothelioma program at the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center. The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation co-sponsored the teleconference, which is available online for free. All mesothelioma patients can benefit f...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Dr. Chukwuemeka Ikpeazu at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center has brought hope — where once there was none — to patients in South Florida with unresectable pleural mesothelioma. Ikpeazu is the principal investigator in the multicenter phase II clinical trial involving the much-anticipated immunotherapy drug durvalumab. Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca manufactures the drug under the brand name Imfinzi. “I am optimistic, very, very optimistic that this drug will be effective for these patients,” Ikpeazu told Asbestos.com. “All the data, all the earlier studies, are encouraging.” He...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Banning all forms of asbestos won’t end the problem of asbestos-related diseases. It is merely a good starting point. As more countries around the world move closer to an outright ban, Australia has become a reminder to guard against false hope. The Australian experience proves how unrelenting this problem is and how much more work must be done. Fifteen years after its much-celebrated ban of the toxic mineral, Australia has just reached its peak of asbestos-related diseases such as malignant mesothelioma cancer. “It took many years, and efforts from many organizations, for a complete ban to be put in place,&rdq...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
RBL2/p130 is a direct AKT target and is required to induce apoptosis upon AKT inhibition in lung cancer and mesothelioma cell lines, Published online: 02 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41388-018-0214-3RBL2/p130 is a direct AKT target and is required to induce apoptosis upon AKT inhibition in lung cancer and mesothelioma cell lines
Source: Oncogene - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Leprieur EG, Jablons DM, He B Abstract The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway is physiologically involved during embryogenesis, but is also activated in several diseases, including solid cancers. Previous studies have demonstrated that the Shh pathway is involved in oncogenesis, tumor progression and chemoresistance in lung cancer and mesothelioma. The Shh pathway is also closely associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells. Recent findings have revealed that a small proportion of lung cancer cells expressed an abnormal full-length Shh protein, associated with cancer stem cell features...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Source: Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Maxim LD, Utell MJ Abstract This literature review on refractory ceramic fibers (RCF) summarizes relevant information on manufacturing, processing, applications, occupational exposure, toxicology and epidemiology studies. Rodent toxicology studies conducted in the 1980s showed that RCF caused fibrosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. Interpretation of these studies was difficult for various reasons (e.g. overload in chronic inhalation bioassays), but spurred the development of a comprehensive product stewardship program under EPA and later OSHA oversight. Epidemiology studies (both morbidity and mortality) w...
Source: Inhalation Toxicology - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Inhal Toxicol Source Type: research
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