BAP1 Mesothelioma Mutation Focus of Upcoming Clinical Trial

Researchers at the University of Hawaii believe they are close to a fix for the genetic mutation that makes certain people more susceptible to developing mesothelioma cancer and more resistant to chemotherapy. Dr. Michele Carbone, director of thoracic oncology at the UH Cancer Center, said the BAP1 genetic mutation his research first uncovered in 2011 will be key to future prevention and treatment of mesothelioma. “I do not like to make promises,” Carbone told Asbestos.com. “But our record shows that we’ve always delivered more than we planned for. We have a pretty good idea how to fix it.” His research team detailed its findings in the latest issue of Nature, which is often regarded as the world’s premier scientific journal. “That [it was published in Nature] should answer your question of just how significant these findings are. It shows the power of collaboration,” Carbone said. “We want to prevent and treat cancer in as many people as possible.” BAP1 Mutation Can Be Inherited The findings explained how and why mesothelioma incidence increases with BAP1 mutation. The mutation is found in an estimated 70 percent of mesothelioma cases, 90 percent of eye melanomas but only 20 percent of cancers overall. A person can be born with a mutated BAP1 gene, which is often inherited, or it can develop later as the cells become malignant. The research paper published in Nature details how the BAP1 gene regulates a channel that...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: bap1 gene mutation doctor michele carbone gene therapy for mesothelioma mesothelioma clinical trial university of hawaii cancer center Source Type: news

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Gene therapy is moving closer to becoming part of standard-of-care treatment for pleural mesothelioma, according to the latest multicenter clinical trial. The phase III trial, known as the INFINITE clinical research study, is designed to evaluate the intrapleural delivery of an investigational drug — a type of gene therapy — in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine, anti-inflammatory and chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Researchers hope to stop, or at least slow, the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells with the combination therapy. “This is a very interesting concept,” oncologist Dr. Bernardo G...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Gene therapy is moving closer to becoming part of standard-of-care treatment for pleural mesothelioma, according to the latest multicenter clinical trial. The phase III trial, known as the INFINITE clinical research study, is designed to evaluate the intrapleural delivery of an investigational drug — a type of gene therapy — in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine, anti-inflammatory and chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Researchers hope to stop, or at least slow, the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells with the combination therapy. “This is a very interesting concept,” oncologist Dr. Bernardo G...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
A promising and expensive type of immunotherapy, called CAR T-cell therapy, is now covered by Medicare. This news may affect mesothelioma patients in the future. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell, or CAR T-cell, therapy involves the laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s T cells, which are a type of white blood cell responsible for protecting the body against infection and disease. The T cells are genetically modified to better recognize and attack cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the immunotherapy procedure for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Pioneering pulmonologists Dr. Steven Albelda and Dr. Daniel Sterman have worked for more than 20 years on developing gene therapy to effectively combat pleural mesothelioma cancer. The payoff may have finally arrived. Albelda and Sterman’s long-awaited, phase III clinical trial will open this month to evaluate the efficacy of TR002, a novel gene therapy drug, when used in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine. TR002, a form of immunotherapy, is a genetically engineered adenovirus that triggers the anti-tumor effects of interferon, a naturally occurring protein that destroys cancer cells. “The hope is, if i...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
A long-awaited phase III clinical trial of a novel gene therapy could change malignant pleural mesothelioma treatment in the future. The trial, which will include almost 50 locations around the world, opens this month for mesothelioma patients whose standard treatment has stopped working. The gene therapy drug, called TR002, is also a form of immunotherapy. It will be used in combination with gemcitabine chemotherapy in a second-line setting. “We can’t predict what the outcome will be, but we’re very excited about the potential of this treatment, and the fact there may be another drug in the armamentarium...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Robert Cameron and the Pacific Mesothelioma Center moved closer to a major treatment advance by obtaining U.S. patent approval for their novel mesenchymal stem cell research program. The patent approval in February makes the research program more attractive to potential investors who could accelerate development and change the way malignant mesothelioma is treated. “This is a big deal in the developmental path for MSC [mesenchymal stem cell] therapy,” Patent Adviser Dr. Walid Sabbagh told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “The patent is a pathway to really help these cancer pat...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
The National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, has opened an innovative clinical trial for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma that will explore the safety and effectiveness of a novel CAR T-cell therapy. The phase I trial also is being conducted at Washington University in St. Louis. It is aimed at patients whose disease has relapsed after initial chemotherapy treatment. It involves a laboratory modification of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — that can help the immune system kill the cancer. CAR T-cell therapy is a form of gene therapy that has been highly successful with blood...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
All patients diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma should undergo genetic testing to better identify the most appropriate treatment plan, according to Dr. Michele Carbone, the director of thoracic oncology at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center. Genetic testing also could lead to a more accurate prognosis and help family members determine if they are more susceptible to the cancer. Carbone estimates only one-third of all mesothelioma patients today have undergone the testing. “Some of these patients could definitely benefit from genetic testing,” Carbone told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. Carbon...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
The eighth annual International Symposium on Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Saturday at UCLA will reflect the rapidly evolving philosophy on future treatment of this rare cancer. Change is coming. The Symposium, which was first held in 2011 to help bring awareness to lung-sparing surgery, will highlight groundbreaking discoveries and the latest advances in immunotherapy and gene therapy — believed to be the future of cancer care. The longtime chemotherapy and surgery standard-of-care routine is fading. The symposium at the Luskin Conference Center on the UCLA campus in Los Angeles will help explain why. “There ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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