Varian Medical wins FDA nod for Halcyon radiotherapy cancer treatment system

Varian Medical (NYSE:VAR) said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its Halcyon image-guided volumetric intensity modulated radiotherapy cancer treatment system. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based company said its Halcyon IMRT system features improvements that make it more comfortable for patients and streamline operator’s workflow, only requiring 9 steps from start to treatment, down from 30 steps in legacy machines. “We are proud that Halcyon has now received both 510(k) clearance and CE mark. With its human-centered and user-friendly design, Halcyon is engineered to revolutionize clinical workflow. These two clearances are very important milestones in the availability of this new system and advancing cost-effective cancer care worldwide,” Varian oncology systems biz prez Kolleen Kennedy said in a press release. Varian Medical said the device is designed to handle “the majority” of cancer patients, including individuals with prostate, breast, head &neck and other forms of cancer. The system requires the company’s Eclipse 15.1.1 treatment planning software, which is currently pending 510(k) approval. In May, Varian Medical said it won Shonin approval from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare for its ProBeam system designed for proton therapy. The post Varian Medical wins FDA nod for Halcyon radiotherapy cancer treatment system appeared first on MassDevice.
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: 510(k) Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Oncology Regulatory/Compliance Varian Medical Systems Source Type: news

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The use of a specific treatment technique in radiation therapy is mainly motivated by the achievable dose conformity to the target and the overall integral dose. Proton therapy offers a highly conformal and comprehensive treatment option with a lower integral dose (reduced low-dose bath) to organs at risk (OARs). Consequently, given the proximity of cardiopulmonary structures, proton therapy has been discussed as a treatment alternative for breast cancer patients [1 –3]. Treatment planning studies, comparing 3DCRT, IMRT, and proton therapy when irradiating the breast and regional nodes showed advantages of using prot...
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
bres REFCOR Abstract Sinonasal carcinomas account for 3% of ENT cancers. They are subdivided into squamous cell carcinomas (50%), adenocarcinomas [20%, mostly of intestinal type (ITAC)], and more rarely, adenoid cystic carcinomas, olfactory neuroblastomas (=esthesioneuroblastomas), neuroendocrine carcinomas or undifferentiated sinonasal carcinomas (SNUC). The 5-year survival rates are, in descending order, 72% for neuroblastomas, 63% for adenocarcinomas, 50-60% for large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 53% for squamous cell carcinomas, 25-50% for adenoid cystic, 35% for small-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and 35%...
Source: Bulletin du Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Bull Cancer Source Type: research
Radiation therapy (RT) of thoracic cancers may cause severe radiation dermatitis (RD), which impacts on the quality of a patient's life. Aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of acute RD and develop normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for severe RD in thoracic cancer patients treated with Intensity-Modulated RT (IMRT) or Passive Scattering Proton Therapy (PSPT). We analyzed 166 Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) patients prospectively treated at a single institution with IMRT (103 patients) or PSPT (63 patients). All patients were treated to a prescribed dose of 60 to 74 Gy in conventional daily f...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
There is a paucity of published data on the outcomes of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) treated with proton therapy (PT). Here we report the dosimetry parameters, treatment-related toxicities and clinical outcomes of NPC treated with intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and in matched NPC cases treated with intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) from the same single institution.
Source: International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Definitive Management of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Source Type: research
To quantify tumor anatomic change of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients given passive-scattering proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) through 6 –7 weeks of treatment, ...
Source: Radiation Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Sequential MB approach for LANPC patients provides a significantly lower acute toxicity profile compared to full course of IMRT. There were no differences in early-late morbidities and disease-related outcomes (censored at two-years) but a longer follow-up is required to achieve conclusive results. PMID: 32090645 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Acta Oncologica - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Acta Oncol Source Type: research
Both plan quality and robustness were investigated through comparing some dosimetric metrics between intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy based intensity modulated radiotherapy (IM...
Source: Radiation Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: IMPT plans improve both the target coverage and the OARs sparing, especially for the heart, cardiac substructures (LAD and LV), lungs and normal tissue, in synchronous bilateral breast radiotherapy. VMAT and HT could be selected as suboptimal techniques for SBBC patients.
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Combined proton-photon treatments may play a role in developing a new solution for proton therapy without a gantry. Optimal combinations improve on IMRT plans and reduce the risk of side effects while making protons available to more patients. PMID: 31923713 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Radiother Oncol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Highly conformal photon and proton beam techniques enable high-dose re-irradiation of the target volume. They, however, significantly differ in the dose deposited in the OARs. The therapeutic options, i.e., re-irradiation or systemic therapy, need to be carefully weighed and discussed with the patients. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: Highly conformal photon and proton beam techniques enable high-dose re-irradiation of the target volume. In light of the abilities of the various highly conformal techniques to spare specific organs at risk, the therapeutic options need to be carefully weighed and patients included in...
Source: The British Journal of Radiology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Br J Radiol Source Type: research
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