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Ipsen wins approval for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor drug

Ipsen (EPA:IPN) said today that Teijin Pharma Ltd. won approval from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare for Ipsen’s Somatuline as a therapy for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The subcutaneous drug was approved in Japan in 2012 for the treatment of acromegaly and pituitary gigantism. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Ipsen wins approval for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor drug appeared first on MassDevice.
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Pharmaceuticals Regulatory/Compliance Wall Street Beat Ipsen Teijin Pharma Source Type: news

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Conclusion: In this review, we aim to provide evidence for the correlation between the two disorders.Integr Med Int 2017;4:94-100
Source: Integrative Medicine International - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion: In this review, we aim to provide evidence for the correlation between the two disorders.Integr Med Int 2017;4:94-100
Source: Integrative Medicine International - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2017 Source:The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Volume 5, Issue 8 Author(s): Francesco M Galassi, Maciej Henneberg, Wouter de Herder, Frank Rühli, Michael E Habicht
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Lauren Bates, 26, from New Romney, Kent, was diagnosed with acromegaly. The rare condition was made famous by Richard Kiel, who played Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Lauren Bates, 26, from New Romney, Kent, was diagnosed with acromegaly. The rare condition was made famous by Richard Kiel, who played Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract An increased rate of acromegaly was reported in industrialized areas, suggesting an involvement of environmental pollutants in the pathogenesis and behavior of GH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Based on these premises, the aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of some widely diffused pollutants (i.e. benzene, BZ; bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, DEHP and polychlorinated biphenyls, PCB) on growth hormone secretion, the somatostatin and estrogenic pathways, viability and proliferation of rat GH-producing pituitary adenoma (GH3) cells. All the pollutants induced a statistically significant increase in GH s...
Source: Environmental Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Res Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeWhether the renin –angiotensin–aldosterone system plays a role or not in the development of cardiovascular morbidity in acromegaly patients is unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between ACE (I/D) and AGT (M235T) gene polymorphisms and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in the acr omegaly.MethodsThe study included one hundred and seventeen acromegalic patients (62  F/55 M, age: 50.2 ± 12.3 years) and 106 healthy controls (92 F/14 M, age: 41.4 ± 11.3 years). PCR method was used to evaluate the prevalence...
Source: Pituitary - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion. The most common causes of hypopituitarism in our database are pituitary adenomas. Increased awareness of the other causes of pituitary dysfunction, such as congenital, head trauma, extrapituitary cranial irradiation, and infections, is the reason for a higher frequency of these etiologies of hypopituitarism in the presented database. PMID: 28702053 [PubMed]
Source: International Journal of Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Int J Endocrinol Source Type: research
Conditions:   Acromegaly;   Osteoporosis Risk Intervention:   Drug: Pegvisomant Sponsors:   Columbia University;   Pfizer Recruiting - verified July 2017
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
As the business took off, more space was needed, and the company moved in 2009 to “real” office space just up the road in Haddam, CT, across the street from the Connecticut River, eventually employing a staff of 10 that year. A year later, in 2010, Infusion had doubled in size and became part of the UDG/Ashfield family. Infusion continued to grow at a steady pace into new therapeutic areas with more clients and employees, and in October 2016, Infusion left its country setting and moved into larger corporate offices in downtown Middletown, CT. Our staff now comprises 45 people and includes account executives, me...
Source: Ashfield Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tags: Ashfield Source Type: news
More News: Acromegaly | Brain | Gastroenterology | Japan Health | Neurology | Pharmaceuticals