Older males 'reduce IVF conception rates'

Study suggests male age is a significant factor in successful births Related items fromOnMedica Men with infertility at risk of general health issues Fertility treatment explains most birth complications of older mums Women doing heavy or shift work have lower fertility First UK approval for gene editing on human embryos Obese couples take longer to achieve pregnancy
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: By triggering multiple inflammatory and oxidative pathways, the combined administration of SrE, selenium and lycopene might likely improve the sperm quality. Proper studies are needed to test this hypothesis. Finally, since prostatitis can affect the sperm quality and considering the anti-estrogenic properties of SrE, we speculate about a possible specific indication in those patients with male infertility and "metabolic" prostatitis (where obesity and abnormal androgen/estrogen ratio concomitantly occur). PMID: 31002161 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
In this study, 8-week-old mice were randomly divided into four groups. Mice were fed a normal diet or an HFD with or without SFN supplementation. SFN was subcutaneously injected at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg 5 days/week for 4 weeks beginning 8 weeks after initiation of the HFD. The results demonstrated that SFN could protect against HFD-induced reproductive dysfunction in male mice. Moreover, SFN also improved reproductive ability, as demonstrated by an increased pregnancy rate and decreased embryo resorption rate in comparison to the corresponding HFD group. We also observed a decrease in apoptosis and an attenuation of endoplas...
Source: Biology of Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Biol Reprod Source Type: research
Conclusion The periconceptional environment and lifestyle factors modify sperm epigenome. This alteration might be maintained in the zygote and throughout development, thereby leading to the inheritance of newly acquired pathologies. The role of sperm miRNA, not only as innovative markers of fertility issues but also as vectors involved in the inheritance of paternal diseases, appears to be crucial. Overweight and obesity seem to alter sperm miRNA profile, thereby leading to transmission of different miRNA profiles in zygote, with consequences on embryo development. In long term, metabolic disorders have been described in...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Jie Cai1†, Yi Zhang1†, Yuying Wang1, Shengxian Li1, Lihua Wang1, Jun Zheng1, Yihong Jiang1, Ying Dong1, Huan Zhou1, Yaomin Hu1, Jing Ma1, Wei Liu1,2*† and Tao Tao1*† 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Pudong, China 2Shanghai Key Laboratory for Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics, Center for Reproductive Medicine, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Pudong, China Background: Infertility and dyslipidemia are frequently present in both women...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Advanced maternal age women are at a higher risk of adverse obstetrical and perinatal outcomes. In both comparisons, worse outcomes were more prevalent in the older group, suggesting that poorer outcomes are more prevalent with increasing age. PMID: 30946794 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Medica Portuguesa - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Med Port Source Type: research
Conditions:   Infertility, Female;   Obesity;   Insulin Resistance Interventions:   Behavioral: weight loss intervention;   Drug: metformin intervention Sponsor:   Reproductive & Genetic Hospital of CITIC-Xiangya Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
More than 1/3 of reproductive-age females in the United States are obese.[1] When compared to normal-weight women, obese women are more likely to be infertile and less likely to achieve clinical pregnancy with IVF, possibly due to a negative association between obesity and endometrial receptivity.[2-4]
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Poster Presentation Source Type: research
This study examined whether this association persisted in patients with suspected equivalent ovarian reserve by analyzing those with unexplained infertility.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Poster Presentation Source Type: research
by Iyad H. Manaserh, Lakshmikanth Chikkamenahalli, Samyuktha Ravi, Prabhatchandra R. Dube, Joshua J. Park, Jennifer W. Hill Insulin resistance and obesity are associated with reduced gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release and infertility. Mice that lack insulin receptors (IRs) throughout development in both neuronal and non-neuronal brain cells are known to exhibit subfertility due to hypogonadotropic hypogonadi sm. However, attempts to recapitulate this phenotype by targeting specific neurons have failed. To determine whether astrocytic insulin sensing plays a role in the regulation of fertility, we generated mice...
Source: PLoS Biology: Archived Table of Contents - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
Muffin tops, man boobs, and bagel bumps: These are among the varied and perverse ways that the hormonal distortions inflicted on unwitting humans who consume the seeds of grasses, i.e., grains, show themselves. In our modern world filled with thousands of processed foods, there are plenty of landmines for health. Gummy bears and gumdrops will rot teeth, for instance. Indulge in a handful of dried prunes and you’ll have to schedule a substantial portion of your day on the toilet due to bowel irritants. But only wheat and grains are associated with a wide swath of health problems that range from autoimmune disease to m...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates grain-free gynecomastia man boobs man breasts testosterone undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
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