Yeast lysates carrying the nucleoprotein from measles virus vaccine as a novel subunit vaccine platform to deliver Plasmodium circumsporozoite antigen

Yeast cells represent an established bioreactor to produce recombinant proteins for subunit vaccine development. In addition, delivery of vaccine antigens directly within heat-inactivated yeast cells is attrac...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research

Related Links:

(American Chemical Society) Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting inACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sustained release of vaccine components, increasing the potency, quality and duration of immune responses in mice.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump on Sunday announced emergency authorization to treat COVID-19 patients with convalescent plasma — a move he called “a breakthrough,” one of his top health officials called “promising” and other health experts said needs more study before it’s celebrated. The announcement came after White House officials complained there were politically motivated delays by the Food and Drug Administration in approving a vaccine and therapeutics for the disease that has upended Trump’s reelection chances. On the eve of the Republican National Convention, T...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news
Parvez Mahmud Pneumonia is a virulent disease that causes the death of millions of people around the world. Every year it kills more children than malaria, AIDS, and measles combined and it accounts for approximately one in five child-deaths worldwide. The invention of antibiotics and vaccines in the past century has notably increased the survival rate of Pneumonia patients. Currently, the primary challenge is to detect the disease at an early stage and determine its type to initiate the appropriate treatment. Usually, a trained physician or a radiologist undertakes the task of diagnosing Pneumonia by examining the pat...
Source: Sensors - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This article includes reporting by Ivet González in Havana, Mario Osava in Rio de Janeiro, and Orlando Milesi in Santiago. The post Latin America Has Weak Defences Against the Pandemic appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Latin America & the Caribbean Population Regional Categories Coronavirus COVID-19 ECLAC Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) Poverty World Health Organ Source Type: news
Authors: Schlipköter U, Flahault A Abstract The past two centuries have seen enormous achievements in control of infectious diseases, previously the leading cause of death, in large measure due to sanitation and food safety, vaccines, antibiotics and improved nutrition. This has led people to put their faith in the notion that medical science would succeed in overcoming the remaining obstacles. Vaccination has eradicated smallpox, nearly eradicated poliomyelitis and greatly reduced many other highly dangerous infections such as diphtheria, tetanus and measles. New diseases such as HIV and new forms of influenz...
Source: Public Health Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rev Source Type: research
Patients with symptoms advised to call GP rather than attend practice Related items fromOnMedica Warn patients that natural malaria immunity fades Single-dose malaria drug eliminates parasite from liver Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? Parents still following folklore methods for cold prevention Double check patients with ‘penicillin’ allergy to avoid MRSA risk
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Nanorobots swimming in blood vessels, in silico clinical trials instead of experimenting with drugs on animals and people, remote brain surgeries with the help of 5G networks – the second part of our shortlist on some astonishing ideas and innovations that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine is ready for you to digest. Here, we’re going beyond the first part with medical tricorders, the CRISPR/Cas-9 gene-editing method, and other futuristic medical technologies to watch for. 11) In silico clinical trials against testing drugs on animals As technologies transform every aspect of healthcare,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence E-Patients Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers 3d printing AI bioprinting blockchain clinical trials CRISPR digital digital health drug development genetics Innovat Source Type: blogs
In this study we review clinical incidents concerning vaccines or malaria prophylaxis reported between 2016 and 2018. Two-hundred-and-fifty-one clinical incident calls were recorded, and commonly concerned scheduling or dosing errors. Vaccine scheduling errors accounted for 103 calls (41%), predominantly due to hepatitis A or hepatitis B vaccination either alone or in combination (65/103, 63%). Administration of yellow fever vaccine within 28 days of measles, mumps and rubella accounted for a further 15 (15%) calls. Twenty-six (10%) calls reported administration of a vaccine that was not recommended either for the destin...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
30 million to be offered free NHS flu jab this winter Related items fromOnMedica Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers Routine child vaccination coverage rates fall World ’s first malaria vaccine piloted in Malawi babies Parental confidence in immunisation programme ‘very high’ Easter travellers warned over Europe measles outbreak
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
More News: Infectious Diseases | Malaria | Malaria Vaccine | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Vaccines