Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Trends in Research Literature Describing Dysphagia in Motor Neuron Diseases (MND): A Scoping Review

AbstractDysphagia in motor neuron diseases (MNDs) is highly complex, affecting all stages of swallowing and leading to impaired swallowing safety and efficiency. In order to explore the degree to which research is capturing the symptom of dysphagia in MND, we conducted a scoping review of the existing literature. The primary aims of this review were to identify common themes within the literature on dysphagia in MND, explore patterns and trends in research focus, and identify if any imbalances exist between the research themes related to dysphagia description and management. A comprehensive search strategy yielded 1690 unique articles for review. Following relevance screening, a total of 157 articles were included in the synthesis. Relevant data and keywords were extracted from each article and grouped into themes. Frequency estimates were calculated for each theme to identify trends across research literature. Swallowing impairment in MNDs is described in a variety of ways across current research. The most commonly reported theme wasAspiration/Penetration, mentioned in 73.2% of all included articles; a significant imbalance was identified between reports of swallowing safety and efficiency (p = 0.008). The most frequently reported theme related to dysphagia management wasEnteral Nutrition, and very few studies have reported on the efficacy ofRehabilitation/Compensatory recommendations. It is suggested that researchers and clinicians remain mindful of imbalances and...
Source: Dysphagia - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Developments in eye-gaze technology – which converts minute movements of the eye into spoken words – are opening up undreamed of opportunities for people with motor neurone syndromeSteve Thomas and I are talking about brain implants. Bonnie Tyler ’s Holding Out For a Hero is playing in the background and for a moment I almost forget that a disease has robbed Steve of his speech. The conversation breaks briefly; now I see his wheelchair, his ventilator, his hospital bed.Steve, a software engineer, was diagnosed with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a type ofmotor neurone disease) aged 50. He knew i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Motor neurone disease Medical research Technology Society Science Health & wellbeing Life and style Source Type: news
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), the second most common form of dementia in people under 65 years of age, is characterized by progressive atrophy of the frontal and/or temporal lobes. FTD overlaps extensively with the motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), especially at the genetic level. Both FTD and ALS can be caused by many mutations in the same set of genes; the most prevalent of these mutations is a GGGGCC repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72. As shown by recent intensive studies, some key cellular pathways are dysregulated in the ALS-FTD spectrum disorder, including autophagy, nucleoc...
Source: EMBO Journal - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Molecular Biology of Disease, Neuroscience Review Source Type: research
In this report, we made use of a neuroblastoma-spinal cord hybrid motor neuron-like cell line NSC34, and elucidated the potential role of Midazolam on these cells under the insult of oxidative stress. We found the protective effect of Midazolam on motor neurons against cytotoxicity induced by the combination of oligomycin A and rotenone (O/R) or phenylarsine oxide. The characteristics of apoptosis, such as the ratio of TUNEL+ cells or the expression level of cleaved Caspase-3, was decreased by 22 or 45% in the presence of Midazolam. Furthermore, this effect was correlated with the JNK-ERK signaling pathway. Either phosphor...
Source: Human Cell - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
While the death of motor neuron is a pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), defects in other cell types or organs may also actively contribute to ALS disease progression. ALS patients experience progressive skeletal muscle wasting that may not only exacerbate neuronal degeneration, but likely has a significant impact on bone function. In our previous published study, we have discovered severe bone loss in an ALS mouse model with overexpression of ALS-associated mutation SOD1G93A (G93A).
Source: Bone - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Full Length Article Source Type: research
In embryonic development, cells differentiate through stereotypical sequences of intermediate states to generate particular mature fates. By contrast, driving differentiation by ectopically expressing terminal transcription factors (direct programming) can generate similar fates by alternative routes. How differentiation in direct programming relates to embryonic differentiation is unclear. We applied single-cell RNA sequencing to compare two motor neuron differentiation protocols: a standard protocol approximating the embryonic lineage, and a direct programming method. Both initially undergo similar early neural commitmen...
Source: eLife - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Developmental Biology and Stem Cells Source Type: research
AbstractThe mutation of vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB) was proved to cause family amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). Only two mutations ofVAPB associated with ALS have been reported (p.Pro56Ser and p.Thr46Ile). Here we reported a Chinese Han FALS family caused by a novelVAPB point mutation. The clinical materials of one Chinese Han FALS family were collected. The genetic analysis was carried out by target sequencing and further verified by Sanger sequencing. One novel mutation of c.167C>A (p.Pro56His) onVAPB was found in the proband. The age at onset of the proband was 48 with the ons...
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated spastic paralysis in rats following SCIR injury. The number of autophagosomes increased 3 h following the injury, and subsequently decreased slowly to near-normal levels in the sham group as indicated by the autophagy markers microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), beclin-1, and p62. Furthermore, after treatment with the autophagy inhibitor 3-Methyladenine (3-MA) and autophagy activator rapamycin following SCIR, autophagy in the SCIR-3-MA group decreased significantly, while that in the SCIR-Rap group increased, compared with SCIR-DMSO controls group. Moreover, the assessment of...
Source: American Journal of Translational Research - Category: Research Tags: Am J Transl Res Source Type: research
This week, Noel Conway, who has motor neurone disease, lost his High Court battle to allow assisted dying, writes DR MAX PEMBERTON.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Moderate-quality evidence from a single RCT of NIV in 41 participants suggests that it significantly prolongs survival, and low-quality evidence indicates that it improves or maintains quality of life in people with ALS. Survival and quality of life were significantly improved in the subgroup of people with better bulbar function, but not in those with severe bulbar impairment. Adverse effects related to NIV should be systematically reported, as at present there is little information on this subject. More RCT evidence to support the use of NIV in ALS will be difficult to generate, as not offering NIV to the co...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVE Over the last decade, a number of authors have investigated the utility of different biological and synthetic matrices as alternatives to conventional nerve grafts. However, the autologous nerve graft remains the gold standard, even though it often involves using a pure sensory nerve to reconstruct a mixed or even a pure motor nerve. Furthermore, limited donor sites often necessitate a significant mismatch of needed nerve tissue, especially for large proximal nerve defects such as brachial plexus lesions. Here, the authors present a new technique that overcomes these problems: the fascicular shi...
Source: Journal of Neurosurgery.Spine - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: J Neurosurg Spine Source Type: research
More News: Brain | Men | Motor Neurone Disease | Neurology | Nutrition | Speech-Language Pathology | Study