Maine Reports First Confirmed Case Of Measles In 20 Years

The vaccine-preventable disease can cause serious complications, including pneumonia and death.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Reported cases of measles spiked in 2017, threatening years of public health progress and pointing to gaps in vaccination coverage worldwide, according to new data released Thursday from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Between 2000 and 2017, reported measles incidence dropped by 83%, saving about 21 million lives and resulting in an 80% decline in measles mortality, the new data shows. But toward the end of that time period, researchers observed a worrisome trend: between 2016 and 2017, reported measles cases increased by 31% globally. Increases were observed i...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Measles is a highly contagious viral disease and was the cause of millions of deaths each year prior to the introduction of the measles vaccine. Since the introduction of the vaccine, the incidence of measles has dropped significantly (Rota et al., 2016). Immunity to measles was thought to be life-long (Panum, 1847), but it has been demonstrated that immunity wanes over time, regardless of whether immunity was acquired from a killed vaccine, live-attenuated vaccine, or natural infection (Rauh and Schmidt, 1965; Dai et al., 1991; Kremer et al., 2006).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Every August is dedicated to National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM). NIAM is an annual observance designed to highlight the importance of immunizations. Immunizations (also called shots or vaccines) help prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases. Immunization isn’t just for kids – to stay protected against serious illnesses like the flu, measles, and pneumonia, adults need to get vaccinated, too. National Immunization Awareness Month is a great time to promote vaccines and remind family, friends, and coworkers to stay up to date on their shots. Healthfinder.gov has a toolkit for NIAM with strategies...
Source: BHIC - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Public Health Source Type: blogs
We describe the case of a 44 year-old Portuguese woman who presented with fever, conjunctivitis, cough and rash, rapidly evolving to hepatitis and extensive pneumonia with respiratory failure. Although she claimed to be vaccinated according to the national immunisation schedule, a final diagnosis of primary measles pneumonia was clinically made and confirmed by serology. However, some less typical features mislead us initially. Although the rare form of primary measles pneumonia is more prevalent among immunosuppressed patients, our patient was immunocompetent. Moreover, absence of contagiousness, ...
Source: Acta Medica Portuguesa - Category: General Medicine Tags: Acta Med Port Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs
Equitable access to vaccines has been suggested as a priority for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, it is unclear whether providing equitable access is enough to ensure health equity. Furtherm...
Source: BMC Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, got her granddaughter immunized using a mix of private and public clinics. Credit: Veronique Magnin – Habari Kibra VolunteerBy Joyce NgangaNAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 25 2018 (IPS)Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, is certain that her grand-daughter needs to get all her vaccines for her to grow up healthy and strong. She uses a mix of private and public clinics in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlement in Nairobi, to get the 15-month-old the shots she needs. Mary Awour, mother to two-year-old Vilance Amondi, also believes immunization is important to protect her ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
[MSF] Being vaccinated against diseases like diphtheria, measles, whooping cough, meningitis, pneumonia, yellow fever, and other potentially fatal illnesses is a commonplace event for many children. But in northern Mali, where a combination of insecurity, isolation, and limited health infrastructure means that many communities cannot access health facilities, it can prove difficult to protect children against these illnesses.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
The only thing worse than getting the flu is catching it after you’ve gotten a flu shot. It’s been a terrible year for outbreaks — the worst in almost a decade. Contributing to that is the high failure rate of this year’s vaccine. The current shot is just 25 percent effective against the H3N2 virus, this season’s most-often-identified strain by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The experts say, with enough time and money, they can do a lot better. “There has to be a wholesale change to how we make the flu vaccine,” said Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Ce...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news
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