1706 Autonomous Vehicles: Good or Bad for our Health?

Publication date: June 2017 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 5, Supplement Author(s): Samuel Schwartz, Karen Lee According to the World Health Organization, the leading causes of death globally are now non-communicable diseases (NCDs) like cardiovascular disease, cancers, diabetes and chronic lung diseases. NCDs are now responsible for two-thirds of all deaths globally, or 36 million deaths annually. Even in the developing world, heart disease and stroke have overtaken infectious diseases as the leading causes of death. Yet, the vast majority of NCDs are preventable. Physical inactivity, tobacco use, poor diets and harmful use of alcohol are the four leading risk factors of these diseases. Although about 1.25 million people worldwide die annually in traffic crashes, diseases related to physical inactivity result in over 5 million deaths per year. Systematic reviews of the research literature have concluded that there is now sufficient evidence that community-scale and street-scale land use and urban design policies have impacts on physical activity, and are recommended as community-level interventions for increasing physical activity. Land use forms and comprehensive transportation planning can have a big impact on active transportation or sedentary travel. Recently, in large numbers, millennials have been returning to cities and incorporating active transportation in their daily lives. In the United States, vehicle-miles-travelled (VMT) for millennials has d...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

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This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet and sugary beverages and health risks, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage, obesity or another hidden health issue. “The cause behind these associations isn’t clear,” said Bergquist. “Other potential biological causes could be attributed to experimental evidence linking consumption of artificial sweeteners to sugar cravings, appetite stimulation ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Soda Source Type: news
Conclusions: These results obtained using a large-scale population-based database documented interactions among lifestyle factors over time. PMID: 31396377 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: J Prev Med Public Health Source Type: research
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusion In summary, this is the first study to show that BFR exercise did not augment EPC response to exercise, and in fact blunted the EPC response to low load unilateral KE exercise in young, healthy males. Ethics Statement This study was carried out in accordance with the recommendations of Edinburgh Napier University Research and Ethics Governance Committee. The study was ethically approved by Edinburgh Napier University Research and Ethics Governance Committee. All participants gave written informed consent in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Author Contributions MR, RM, AP, CW, GF-J designed the s...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news
This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — It would drive up the price of your barbecue but a global “meat tax” could save 220,000 lives and cut health care bills by $41 billion each year, according to a new study. The numbers are based on evidence that links meat consumption to increased risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes. Three years ago, the World Health Organization declared red meat such as beef, lamb and pork to be carcinogenic when eaten in processed forms, including sausages, bacon and beef jerky. Health officials have also declared that unprocessed red meat like steak and burgers are “probably” carcinog...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Offbeat Local TV Meat Source Type: news
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