Time Between Surgeries Helps Predict Mesothelioma Survival

A new study from researchers at the City of Hope cancer center in Los Angeles and Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, reveals how the length of time between initial and follow-up cytoreduction surgery and HIPEC plays a role in patient survival. The study, published in June in the Journal of Surgical Oncology, shows peritoneal mesothelioma patients who repeat the procedure between one and two years after the initial surgery have the most favorable outcome, with a median overall survival of nearly four years. Peritoneal mesothelioma is an aggressive, asbestos-related cancer, and recurrence is common. “These results are very promising for a select group of patients who recur after cytoredutive surgery (CRS) and HIPEC,” Dr. Konstantinos Votanopoulos, associate professor of surgery at Wake Forest School of Medicine, told Asbestos.com. “In this group, a complete CRS and HIPEC essentially resets the clock in terms of anticipated survival.” The multimodal approach of CRS followed by heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is the standard treatment option for peritoneal mesothelioma patients. In 2013, researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center concluded patients who opted for a second procedure survived nearly three times as long as those who underwent only one procedure. Mesothelioma Results Contrast with Other Cancers The goal of CRS, also known as debulking, is to remove any visible tumors or cancer from multiple sites in the abdome...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: appendiceal cancer city of hope cancer center colon cancer cytoreduction surgery debulking surgery Dr. Konstantinos Votanopoulos gastrointestinal cancer heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy HIPEC Journal of Surgical Oncology moffitt can Source Type: news