Clinical Trial Saves Baby ’s Lungs

Treatment TermsChildren's health CategoriesClinical trialsFamily health TagsPatient story Sub-Title Baby Collier Proves He ’s a Survivor Author Burgetta Wheeler Overview Collier Hart sat smiling in his crib repeatedly saying, “Wa wa.” Given a sippy cup of water, he threw back his head and drained it. He put his hands together, fingertips touching, and made the sign for “more.” None of this is unusual for a 2-year-old, but it is for Collier. He spent the first 15 months of his life at Duke Children’s Hospital af ter being born with severely underdeveloped lungs. Hero Imagecollier_hart_patient_experience.jpg Content Blocks Header Against All Odds Content“All the odds were against this kid,” saidWilliam  Malcolm, MD, a neonatologist and medical director of Duke's  Special Infant Care Clinic. “He’s thriving, and the reasons he’s thriving are his parents, the amount of services we provided at Duke, and Collier himself. You get emotional about outcomes like this.”Before Collier was born, tests atDuke Children ’s Hospital showed a problem with the baby’s lungs. When Natalie Hart went into premature labor, the neonatology team was ready.On July 3, 2014, Collier arrived at 32 weeks weighing 4 pounds, 3 ounces — and crying. No one expected him to be able to cry. Natalie and husband Eric Hart were ecstatic even as their new baby was whisked away to be placed on a ve...
Source: dukehealth.org: Health Tips - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: news

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By ANISH KOKA   The year was 1965, the place was Boston Children’s and a surgery resident named Robert Bartlett took his turn at the bedside of a just born baby unable to breathe.  This particular baby couldn’t breathe because of a hole in the diaphragm that had allowed the intestines to travel up into the thoracic cage, and prevent normal development of the lungs.  In 1965, Robert Bartlett was engaged in the cutting edge treatment of the time – squeeze a bag that forced oxygenated air into tiny lungs and hope there was enough functioning lung tissue to participate in gas exchange to allow ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
Authors: Niwa K Abstract The number of women with congenital heart disease (CHD) at risk of pregnancy is growing because over 90% of them are grown-up into adulthood. The outcome of pregnancy and delivery is favorable in most of them provided that functional class and systemic ventricular function are good. Women with CHD such as pulmonary hypertension (Eisenmenger syndrome), severe left ventricular outflow stenosis, cyanotic CHD, aortopathy, Fontan procedure and systemic right ventricle (complete transposition of the great arteries [TGA] after atrial switch, congenitally corrected TGA) carry a high-risk. Most freq...
Source: Korean Circulation Journal - Category: Cardiology Tags: Korean Circ J Source Type: research
ConclusionsIn pregnant patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, decreased mortality has been observed over recent years  particularly in patients with well-controlled pulmonary pressure and a positive vasoreactivity test.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) continues to be one of the most challenging conditions in neonatal intensive care. Despite the wide adoption of lung protective strategies for pulmonary hypoplasia and selective vasodilators for pulmonary hypertension, the overall number of babies cannulated for extracorporeal support (ECMO) has been largely unchanged over the last decade. Even more puzzling is that randomized trials did not find any benefit of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in reducing need for ECMO in babies with CDH.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: The Editors' Perspectives Source Type: research
We report successful percutaneous pulmonary artery debanding in a baby complicated by muscular ventricular septal defect (VSD), that was initially large and multiple, but closed spontaneously later. The 5-month-old boy was referred to our hospital on day 3, diagnosed as having aortic coarctation (CoA), with multiple muscular VSDs and severe PH. On day 6, he underwent CoA repair and PAB using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), while the muscular VSDs were left open. We planned percutaneous pulmonary debanding at the age of 5 months, as the muscular VSDs had become small. After dilation with a Mustang® (Boston Sci...
Source: Journal of Cardiology Cases - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Opinion statementAll providers who care for reproductive-aged women with cardiac disease should assess these patients ’ desires and plans for pregnancy at every encounter. For those considering pregnancy, preconception counseling, often performed by a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, can help patients understand the potential implications of pregnancy on their health and estimate the risks of an adverse cardia c event prior to conceiving. There are cardiac conditions, such as pulmonary hypertension and aortic stenosis, in which pregnancy may be contraindicated given the high morbidity and mortality; there are tool...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
[12-14-2011] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is updating the public on the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants by women during pregnancy and the potential risk of a rare heart and lung condition known as persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN).
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news
Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) relaxes blood vessels in the lungs and is an important and life-saving treatment for pulmonary hypertension. Current iNO delivery solutions are estimated to cost $2,800 per day and rely on compressed gas delivery which...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD As southern states entertain legislation granting nurse practitioners independent practice rights, there are some finer details which deserve careful deliberation. While nurse practitioners are intelligent, capable, and contribute much to our healthcare system, they are not physicians and lack the same training and knowledge base. They should not identify themselves as “doctors” despite having a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. It is misleading to patients, as most do not realize the difference in education necessary for an MD or DO compared to a DNP. Furthermore, until they are req...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
When a child is born ill or with disabilities, there is love, but there is also fear. Fear of what will happen during the endless medical procedures, what kind life the child might live, how life will be different than what was imagined and fear of paying for it all. When my daughter Claire was born almost 11 years ago, her health and future were uncertain. Born with a rare genetic disorder that affects nearly every part of her body, Claire spent time in the neo-natal intensive care unit, had heart surgery when she was 4 months old, and endured test after test after test to figure out the extent of the impact of her extra ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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