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Why Fertility Treatments Are So Out Of Reach For Most Americans

Much has been made of the high cost of rearing children in the United States, and rightly so. Families spend more than $230,000 on average to raise kids from birth to age 17 — a figure that doesn’t include the cost of college.  But for the 6.9 million women who have turned to fertility services, the bills pile up well before they ever hold a baby in their arms. A single cycle of in vitro fertilization, or IVF, costs more than $12,000 on average in the United States, not counting the cost of medications and travel. Only 15 states require insurance coverage for fertility treatments. So for many would-be parents, IVF is simply out of reach. Against that backdrop, the Sher Institute — a network of nine private fertility centers across the country — has run a popular but controversial free IVF contest for the past five years. The institute encourages people who couldn’t otherwise afford IVF to vie for two free rounds by submitting personal and often extremely emotional video pleas about their quest to have a baby. The contest has been slammed as a manipulative publicity maneuver ― and defended as a necessary response to a reality in which only the very privileged can afford fertility treatment.  Documentary filmmaker Amanda Micheli dove into the controversy in her documentary “Vegas Baby” (now available online and playing in select theaters around the country). A trailer for the film can be seen above. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Authors: Fung C, Dinh P, Ardeshir-Rouhani-Fard S, Schaffer K, Fossa SD, Travis LB Abstract Testicular cancer has become the paradigm of adult-onset cancer survivorship, due to the young age at diagnosis and 10-year relative survival of 95%. This clinical review presents the current status of various treatment-related complications experienced by long-term testicular cancer survivors (TCS) free of disease for 5 or more years after primary treatment. Cardiovascular disease and second malignant neoplasms represent the most common potentially life-threatening late effects. Other long-term adverse outcomes include neuro...
Source: Advances in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Adv Urol Source Type: research
Modern medicine has extended the survival of men with testicular cancer to greater than 95%. Because testicular cancer occurs most commonly between ages 20 and 34 years, reproductive potential is a frequent concern. Moreover, men with testicular cancer are already at greater risk for subfertility (1). The cause of this is unclear, although theories have included direct tumor effect, tumor cytokine effect, and underlying germ cell abnormalities that dispose toward both infertility and cancer development.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Abstract The human Y chromosome harbors genes that are responsible for testis development and also for initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis in adulthood. The long arm of the Y chromosome (Yq) contains many ampliconic and palindromic sequences making it predisposed to self-recombination during spermatogenesis and hence susceptible to intra-chromosomal deletions. Such deletions lead to copy number variation in genes of the Y chromosome resulting in male infertility. Three common Yq deletions that recur in infertile males are termed as AZF (Azoospermia Factor) microdeletions viz. AZFa, AZFb and AZFc. As...
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
UCLA researchers have made new inroads into understanding germ cell tumors, a diverse and rare group of cancers that begin in germ cells — the cells that develop into sperm and eggs. The researchers developed a protocol to recreate germ cell tumor cells from stem cells and used the new model to study the genetics of the cancer.Their findings could point the way toward new drugs to treat germ cell tumors, which account for around 3 percent of all cases of childhood and adolescent cancer.The study, published in Stem Cell Research, was led by Amander Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology an...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 6 January 2018 Source:Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology Author(s): Melissa Tharmalingam, Anne Jorgensen, Rod T. Mitchell The mammalian testis has two main roles, production of gametes for reproduction and synthesis of steroid- and peptide hormones for masculinization. These processes are tightly regulated and involve complex interactions between a number of germ and somatic cell-types that comprise a unique microenvironment known as the germ stem cell niche. In humans, failure of normal testicular development or function is associated with susceptibility to a variety of male reproduct...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusions Post-chemotherapy azoospermia can be successfully treated with TESE and ICSI, and should be offered to azoospermic cancer survivors who did not cryopreserve sperm prior to their gonadotoxic treatments.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Contents Persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is a sex‐limited disorder in which males develop portions of the female reproductive tract. Important consequences of PMDS are cryptorchidism and its sequelae of infertility and increased risk of testicular cancer. Anti‐Müllerian hormone (AMH) and its receptor (AMHR2) induce the regression of the Müllerian ducts in male embryos. In Miniature Schnauzer dogs, the genetic basis has been identified as an autosomal recessive nonsense mutation in AMHR2, but the allele frequency of the mutation is unknown. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to estima...
Source: Reproduction in Domestic Animals - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Post-chemotherapy azoospermia can be successfully treated with TESE and ICSI, and should be offered to azoospermic cancer survivors who did not cryopreserve sperm prior to their gonadotoxic treatments. PMID: 29179011 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol Source Type: research
Testicular germ cell tumour Seminoma (SGCT) is the most common type of testicular cancer affecting young adult men. In these men, the semen quality begin to decline along with disturbances in the reproductive hormones. There is a lack of literature examining proteomic changes at the spermatogenic level in samples banked prior to cancer treatment. We set out to identify the sperm proteins and their role in altered semen quality in SGCT patients by proteomics and bioinformatics tool.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Poster session Source Type: research
Researchers from Lund University in Sweden found infertile men are likely to suffer from a deficiency of the hormone testosterone. This may increase the risk of testicular cancer.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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