PBL Gains Approval to Advance Next Generation Anthrax Vaccine

Porton Biopharma Ltd (PBL) has announced that it has signed a modification to its contract with the US National Institute of Health's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to advance a next generation intra-nasal anthrax vacci …
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

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Due to the disorganized nature of blood vessels that run through tumors, chemotherapeutic agents often fail to penetrate tumors and kill cancer cells at the tumor ’s center. This can lead to ineffective chemotherapeutic treatments, because tumors can quickly grow back if the entire tumor is not destroyed. NIH researchers have developed a therapeutic agent that solves this problem facing current chemotherapy treatments. By elegantly exploiting cell surfac e proteases present at high levels in tumors, they have developed a tumor-targeted anthrax based toxin that inactivates the blood vessels within tumors. While in som...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Dibyendu Banerjee, Baishali Chakraborty, Banya ChakrabortyIndian Journal of Dermatology 2017 62(5):456-458 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has classified all the emerging infectious diseases agents under three categories. Among Category A priority pathogens comes Bacillus anthracis –the causative agent of Anthrax. It is a gram positive spore bearing bacteria, and the disease is typically associated with grazing animals, and affects the people as a zoonosis. The disease can be classically transmitted by three routes namely: cutaneous, gastrointestinal and pulmonary, with a fourth route recently ...
Source: Indian Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
This technology describes the use of novel mutated anthrax protective antigen (PA) protein variants to target tumor cells and tumor vasculature. NIH scientists have engineered two PA variants that selectively complement one another and combine to form active octamers that target tumor cells. This controlled oligomeric activation of the PA proteins makes the likelihood of toxicity to non-tumor cells very low since non-tumor tissue does not express certain cell-surface proteases required to activate the PA variants. Using proteases that are highly expressed in tumor cells, e.g., matrix metalloproteases (MMP) and urokinase pl...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Available for licensing are novel conjugated or fusion proteins comprised of anthrax toxin lethal factor cytolethal distending toxin subunit B. Several human tumor cell lines have been found to be highly sensitive to these toxins with LD50 values in the pM range.In vivo studies in mice have revealed that these toxins selectively treat tumors and have very low systemic toxicity.IC: NIAIDNIH Ref. No.: E-120-2013/0TAB No: TAB-2617Advantages: Selective with low systemic toxicityPotent (pM LD50 values)Applications: Pharmaceutical compositions to selectively treat cancerApplications to treat or prevent g...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
This technology relates to multimeric bacterial protein toxins which can be used to specifically target cells. Specifically, this is a modified recombinant anthrax toxin protective antigen (PrAg) that has been modified in several ways. First, the PrAg can be activated both by a metalloproteinase (MMP) and by urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Second, the native PrAg lethal factor (LF) binding site has been modified so that only a modified PrAg comprising two different monomers can bind anthrax LF. When administered with an effector component, the recombinant anthrax toxins are toxic only to cells expressing both a MMP ...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Due to the disorganized nature of blood vessels that run through tumors, chemotherapeutic agents often fail to penetrate tumors and kill cancer cells at the tumor ’s center. This can lead to ineffective chemotherapeutic treatments, because tumors can quickly grow back if the entire tumor is not destroyed. NIH researchers have developed a therapeutic agent that solves this problem facing current chemotherapy treatments. By elegantly exploiting cell surfac e proteases present at high levels in tumors, they have developed a tumor-targeted anthrax based toxin that inactivates the blood vessels within tumors. While in som...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Editor’s Note: This post reflects on a speech on pandemic preparedness Dr. Fauci gave on January 10, 2017 in Washington, DC, hosted by  The Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center, the Harvard Global Health Institute, and Health Affairs. One of the most important challenges facing the new Administration is preparedness for the pandemic outbreak of an infectious disease. Infectious diseases will continue to pose a significant threat to public health and the economies of countries worldwide. The U.S. government will need to continue its investment to combat these ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Ebola HIV/AIDS NIH pandemic preparedness Zika Source Type: blogs
Climate change continues to impact on public health Despite what many commenters have said in 2016, climate change is real and is ongoing. That's the thing about science. Just because you don't believe in it, it doesn't go away. In 2016 we have seen evidence of the impact of climate change in a number of different ways. There was an anthrax outbreak in northern Russia as warm weather caused the release of previously frozen deadly anthrax spores. And many experts think that the spread of the Zika virus across much of the Americas was made possible, in part, by changes in temperature that created environments in which the ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Special reports Source Type: news
Conclusions Preliminary investigations on pharmacological properties of B. striata have shown that B. striata is an outstanding astringent hemostatic medicinal, B. striata polysaccharides (BSP) as the major bioactive components not only capable of promoting wound healing, but also show good performance as a kind of promising natural biomaterial. More importantly, BSP are also reported to be excellent embolic material. However, further investigations need to be carried out to fully clarify its efficacy of dispersing swelling and promoting tissue regeneration. Moreover, this plant also needs a lot more investigations to clar...
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, all parts of NIH, describe how combining engineered anthrax toxin proteins and existing chemotherapy drugs could potentially yield a therapy to reduce or eliminate cancerous tumors. The findings, based on testing in mice, will appear in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news
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