Is a new flu pandemic just three mutations away?

Conclusion This laboratory study analysed an H7N9 strain of bird flu. Researchers wanted to explore whether a particular change to the surface proteins of a virus was capable of allowing the strain to bind to human tissue. This would theoretically lead to human-to-human transmission of the flu virus. It is worth noting that this ability to attach to human cells does not necessarily mean a mutated bird flu virus will be able to infect, replicate and transmit between humans. Other changes would also be required. However, they were unable to further investigate whether this surface change could lead to human-to-human transmission of the virus because this type of experiment is not permitted under US law. This research attracted the attention of several experts in the field. Dr Fiona Culley, spokesperson for the British Society for Immunology, &Senior Lecturer in Respiratory Immunology at Imperial College London commented: "This is a good, thorough study which specifically aimed to identify which changes in bird flu would allow the virus to attach to human cells." "The authors found that certain combinations of three mutations were needed for the bird flu to be able to attach to human lung cells. They could potentially happen, but there is currently no evidence that they have ever occurred and the chances of all three occurring together is relatively low." Links To The Headlines Just THREE mutations are needed to make bird flu a potential pandemic strain ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news

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This report shares key lessons learned for community engagement practices during a malaria outbreak response in the Los Tres Brazos neighborhood of urban Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic from 2015-2016. In this two-year period, 233 cases of malaria were reported-more than seven times the number of cases (31) reported in the previous two years. The initial outbreak response by the national malaria program emphasized "top-down" interventions such as active surveillance, vector control, and educative talks within the community. Despite a transient reduction in reported cases in mid-2015, transmission resurged at th...
Source: Pan American Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Rev Panam Salud Publica Source Type: research
Authors: Marín-Sánchez A Abstract The basic clinical characteristics of the first 100 fatal cases from COVID-19 in Colombia were analyzed based on reports from the National Institute of Health (INS) since the beginning of the pandemic. Since the INS records do not include clinical variables of comorbidity in the total number of cases reported as positive, but only in patients with fatal outcome, comorbidities, age and sex available in the daily INS reports were reviewed. Their frequency was identified and mortality risk behavior for the analyzed variables was established and compared with the behavior...
Source: Pan American Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Rev Panam Salud Publica Source Type: research
Authors: Sola A, Rodríguez S, Cardetti M, Dávila C Abstract Objective: To evaluate and report the clinical characteristics and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women and newborns in Latin America. Methods: Descriptive study based on the prospective report of the units of the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology Network. Results: Of 86 pregnant women with COVID-19 confirmed by RT-PCR in seven countries (6 from Latin America, and Equatorial Guinea) 68% (59) were asymptomatic. Of 32% of symptomatic women, 89% (24) had mild symptoms and 3.5% (3) had severe respiratory symptoms. No wom...
Source: Pan American Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Rev Panam Salud Publica Source Type: research
Authors: Adjorlolo S, Egbenya DL Abstract Managing a deadly pandemic in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is challenging. The task becomes tougher when there is an outbreak of an equally deadly disease. This is the present situation of Ghana, a low-resource country, that is confronted with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and cerebrospinal meningitis (CSM) outbreak. Apart from the resource constraint at both governmental and individual levels, such a situation affects the overall wellbeing of ordinary citizens as well as healthcare professionals, particularly those in high-risk areas. Perhaps,...
Source: Global Health Action - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Glob Health Action Source Type: research
Authors: Aluisio AR, Zhu E, Gil G, Kenyon T, Uzevski V, Levine AC Abstract The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has overwhelmed many health systems globally. Innovative initiatives are needed to combat the pandemic and scaleup response efforts. This communication describes a collaborative partnership between an international humanitarian organization and an academic university to develop and rapidly deploy a remote digital COVID-19 trainer-of-trainers (TOT) program to enhance global response. The ongoing program has resulted in more than 900 TOT personnel who have themselves trained over 22,000 frontlin...
Source: Global Health Action - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Glob Health Action Source Type: research
Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2020, Accepted Manuscript DOI: 10.1039/D0PP00221F, PerspectiveLuke Horton, Angeli Eloise Torres, Shanthi Narla, Alexis B. Lyons, Indermeet Kohli, Joel M Gelfand, David Ozog, Iltefat H. Hamzavi, Henry W. Lim The COVID-19 pandemic has sparked a demand for safe and highly effective decontamination techniques for both personal protective equipment (PPE) and hospital and operating rooms. The gradual lifting of lockdown... The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry
Source: RSC - Photochem. Photobiol. Sci. latest articles - Category: Chemistry Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Ng QX, De Deyn MLZQ, Loke W, Yeo WS Abstract Yemen has been faced with the worst cholera epidemic of modern times, with more than 1 million suspected cases and 3000 deaths at the time of writing. This problem is largely due to the longstanding civil war between pro-government forces and the Houthi armed movement, which has severely damaged already vulnerable sanitation and healthcare facilities and systems in the country. It is further compounded by a dire lack of basic amenities, chronic malnutrition, and unfavourable weather conditions. Another contributory component may be aerial transfer by cholera-inf...
Source: Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: J Prev Med Public Health Source Type: research
Authors: Valeriani G, Vukovic IS, Mollica R Abstract Since its early stages, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has posed immense challenges in meeting the public health and healthcare and social care needs of migrants. In line with other reports from United Kingdom and United States, data from Sweden's health authority show that migrants have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Following the World Health Organization's statements, as well as the European Public Health Association's call for action, several centres in Sweden's most populated areas have activated tools to implement national p...
Source: Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: J Prev Med Public Health Source Type: research
This study analyzes the chief control measures and the distinctive features of the responses implemented by Korea and the United States to contain COVID-19 with the goal of extracting lessons that can be applied globally. Even though both nations reported their index cases on the same day, Korea succeeded in flattening the curve, with 10 752 cases as of April 28, 2020, whereas the outbreak skyrocketed in the United States, which had more than 1 million cases at the same time. The prudent and timely execution of control strategies enabled Korea to tame the spread of the virus, whereas the United States paid a major price fo...
Source: Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: J Prev Med Public Health Source Type: research
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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