St. Jude-led study shows good news for childhood cancer survivors

According to a study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, changes in how childhood cancer is treated have led to reduced risks of serious, long-term health effects due to cancer therapy. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), funded by the National Cancer Institute, were unveiled June 2 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. “This is the first comprehensive study to demonstrate how changes in treatments over time have impacte d the…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: news

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Purpose of review Childhood blastomas, unlike adult cancers, originate from developing organs in which molecular and cellular features exhibit differentiation arrest and embryonic characteristics. Conventional cancer therapies, which rely on the generalized cytotoxic effect on rapidly dividing cells, may damage delicate organs in young children, leading to multiple late effects. Deep understanding of the biology of embryonal cancers is crucial in reshaping the cancer treatment paradigm for children. Recent findings p53 plays a major physiological role in embryonic development, by controlling cell proliferation, differ...
Source: Current Opinion in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: CANCER BIOLOGY: Edited by Pierre Hainaut Source Type: research
One of many possible complications of cancer therapy in children is enamel demineralization and such changes in the ion content of dental hard tissues may increase susceptibility to caries. The study aims to assess the prevalence of dental caries among childhood cancer survivors. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 225 children aged between 4 and 18 years, including 75 cancer patients and 150 sex- and age-matched controls. The cancer survivors were recruited from single pediatric oncology center. The control group was formed from students of randomly selected kindergartens and schools. Dental investigation was held b...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Observational Study Source Type: research
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Childhood cancer survivors present with unique challenges for dental management because of dental anomalies caused by cancer therapy. Interprofessional collaborative care between the pediatric dentist and the oncologist during and after cancer therapy will enable best outcomes for the pediatric patient. In addition, dental professionals must be prepared to meet the unique needs of long-term cancer survivors because of the increasing survival rates of childhood cancers. PMID: 30559620 [PubMed]
Source: Ochsner Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Ochsner J Source Type: research
Fortunately>80% of children diagnosed with cancer become long-term survivors; however, this population is at a significantly increased risk of morbidity and mortality as a result of their previous cancer therapy, and long-term follow-up (LTFU) is critical. Multiple barriers to receiving adequate LTFU care have been studied. We investigated whether lack of enrollment in a therapeutic clinical trial may be a barrier to receiving LTFU care. We conducted a review of 353 patient records at the Children’s Hospital of Michigan enrolled in our Children’s Oncology Group registry between January 1, 2005 and December 3...
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Online Articles: Original Articles Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs) in young adult survivors of childhood cancer not receiving survivorship care and to determine whether attending a survivorship-focused healthcare visit was associated with changes in PTSSs. SAMPLE & SETTING: 44 young adult survivors from the Yale Cancer Center in Connecticut without prior survivorship clinic attendance. METHODS & VARIABLES: As part of a larger trial, participants were randomized to a model of survivorship-focused health care. The University of California at Los Angeles Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Reac...
Source: Oncology Nursing Forum - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Oncol Nurs Forum Source Type: research
The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is a common site of unintended, acquired disease either during or after the treatment of cancer. Children treated with external radiation therapy are at the highest risk for developing a thyroid-related late effect, but thyroid dysfunction and second primary thyroid neoplasms can also occur after treatment with radiopharmaceutical agents such as131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine. Increasingly recognized is the development of early thyroid dysfunction as an off-target consequence of the more novel cancer therapeutics such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immune checkpoint inhibitors. T...
Source: Hormone Research in Paediatrics - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Purpose of review Over 80% of children diagnosed with cancer are now cured. The burgeoning population of survivors of childhood cancer experiences high rates of morbidity and mortality due to ‘late-effects’ of treatment. These can be defined as any consequence of treatment that persists beyond or develops after the completion of cancer therapy. Awareness of late-effects is critically important for pediatricians and adult providers alike, as late-effects impact children in proximity to cancer treatment, as well as adults many decades removed. This review presents the importance of lifelong follow-up care for s...
Source: Current Opinion in Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Tags: OFFICE PEDIATRICS: Edited by Henry H. Bernstein Source Type: research
Authors: Gebauer J, Higham C, Langer T, Denzer C, Brabant G Abstract The number of patients surviving five or more years after initial cancer diagnosis has significantly increased over the last decades due to considerable improvements in the treatment of many cancer entities. A negative consequence of this is the emergence of long-term sequelae and endocrine disorders account for a high proportion of these. These late effects can occur decades after cancer treatment and affect up to 50% of childhood cancer survivors. Multiple predisposing factors for endocrine late effects have been identified; including radiation,...
Source: Endocrine Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Endocr Rev Source Type: research
Skeletal abnormalities are common in children and adolescents diagnosed and treated for a malignancy. The spectrum ranges from mild pain to debilitating osteonecrosis and fractures. In this review, we summarize the impact of cancer therapy on the developing skeleton, provide an update on therapeutic strategies for prevention and treatment, and discuss the most recent advances in musculoskeletal research. Early recognition of skeletal abnormalities and strategies to optimize bone health are essential to prevent long-term skeletal sequelae and diminished quality of life in childhood cancer survivors.Horm Res Paediatr
Source: Hormone Research in Paediatrics - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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