Lynch Syndrome Mutations and Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Lynch Syndrome Mutations and Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer

Although Lynch syndrome is thought to increase the risk of colorectal and/or uterine cancer, certain mutations may confer an increased risk of breast or ovarian cancer, researchers say.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

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This study aims to assess the impact of miR-149 rs2292832 C/T polymorphism and miR-149-5p expressions in cytotoxic effect of temozolomide against glioma cells. A total of 137 cases of glioma patients and 21 healthy cases were enrolled in this study for clinical research. We found that miR-149-5p was significantly downregulated in glioma cell lines and in blood leukocyte of glioma patients. Furthermore, miR-149 rs2292832 C/T polymorphism was significantly associated with glioma prognosis and temozolomide resistance. Subsequently, the glioma cell lines stable transfected with common miR-149 expression construct (miR-149-T) a...
Source: NeuroReport - Category: Neurology Tags: Integrative Systems Source Type: research
Source: BMJ News - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
One would hope that it does not require an ongoing pandemic and related hysteria to point out that old people have poorly functioning immune systems, and thus suffer disproportionately the burden of infectious disease. But perhaps it does. The 2017-2018 seasonal influenza, a modestly more severe occurrence of something that happens every year, killed something like 60,000 people in the US alone, with little notice or comment. There is nothing so terrible that it won't be accepted - ignored, even - if it is normal. Floodgates of funding for infectious disease research and development have been opened in response to C...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Authors: Abstract Ovarian cancer is the second most common type of female reproductive cancer, and more women die from ovarian cancer than from cervical cancer and uterine cancer combined. Currently, there is no strategy for early detection of ovarian cancer that reduces ovarian cancer mortality. Taking a detailed personal and family history for breast, gynecologic, and colon cancer facilitates categorizing women based on their risk (average risk or high risk) of developing epithelial ovarian cancer. Women with a strong family history of ovarian, breast, or colon cancer may have hereditary breast and ovarian canc...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Conclusions: All women with newly diagnosed EC should be assessed for inherited predisposition. Regional policies for assessment should be developed in accordance with available resources. Gynecologists are required to upgrade their skills in order to identify, assess, and counsel patients with suspected or established LS and appropriately refer to clinical genetics.
Source: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Uterine Cancer Source Type: research
In a recent note, I discused some theories about why the incidence of colonic cancer is increasing in younger patients (see:Why the Increased Incidence of Colonic Cancer Among Younger Americans?). Continuing in this same vein, a recent article I came across raised the issue of multigene panel testing to reveal genetic mutations in the roughly one-third of patents with early onset colonic cancer (see:Multigene Panel Testing Reveals Mutations in One-Third of Early Onset CRC Patients). Below is an excerpt from the article:Although the overall incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been decreasing in the Unite...
Source: Lab Soft News - Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Lab Industry Trends Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Research Preventive Medicine Source Type: blogs
Authors: Vellone VG, Paudice M, Varesco L Abstract Early diagnosis and proper management of gynecologic malignancies represent a challenge in modern oncology. A growing interest has arisen around the gynecological manifestations of hereditary cancer syndromes. In particular, the discovery of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in ovarian cancer and the mismatch repair genes (MMR) in endometrial carcinoma has revolutionized our approach to the diagnosis and screening of women for ovarian and uterine cancers. The clinical, genetic and pathological features of hereditary cancer syndromes with gynecological manifestations are re...
Source: Minerva Ginecologica - Category: OBGYN Tags: Minerva Ginecol Source Type: research
Ovarian cancer is always the bridesmaid, never the bride. At weddings, there’s a reason we focus on the bride. It’s her big event. She’s the center of attention, and rightly so. But sometimes, the bridesmaid’s speech has more to tell us — and we should listen. We hear a lot about breast cancer. It affects a quarter of a million women and is fatal 15 to 20 percent of the time. Breast cancer is a serious and important disease that merits the time, money, and resources we spend on funding and public awareness each year. But what do you know about ovarian cancer, a disease with a fatality rate of ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Access Cancer Women Veterans Source Type: blogs
Abstract Patients with Lynch Syndrome are at high risk for developing a variety of cancers including cancers of the colon or rectum, small bowel, stomach, uterus, renal pelvis, ureter, biliary tract, ovaries, brain and pancreas (N Engl J Med 348: 919-32, 2003; Gut 57:1097-101, 2008; NCCN, Inc Guideline. Ft. Washington, PA. Online Version 2.2014). Lack of MLH-1 and MSH-2 expression commonly result from germline mutations in this inherited cancer syndrome. Here, we report the case of a patient with a molecularly confirmed germline mutation in MLH-1 along with a colon cancer showing lack of expression of MLH-1 as we...
Source: Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusion: The 25-gene hereditary cancer panel increased the identification of deleterious mutations which would otherwise not have been detected. The variant rate in this setting is similar to the rate reported previously in both community and academic centers where panel testing is used. Use of a hereditary cancer panel in the community oncology practice may improve detection rates and provide an opportunity for enhanced cancer management. Citation Format: Sami Diab, Patricia Rodriguez, Anna Leininger, Lisa Clark, Mike F Janicek, Ellen B Smith, John Sandbach, Jennifer Saam, Lucy Langer. Experience in the community oncol...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Poster Session Abstracts Source Type: research
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer of the Uterus | Colorectal Cancer | Health | Hematology | HNPCC | Lynch Syndrome | Ovarian Cancer | Ovaries