At UAMS, Smeltzer Gets $11M to Study Pathogens

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences said Tuesday that Mark Smeltzer has been awarded $11 million in federal funding for Phase II of a program that supports microbiology and immunology research. Phase I of the Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant was awarded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2012 at $10 million. Phase II began May 1 and is $11 million. The first COBRE grant allowed Smeltzer to establish the UAMS Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Inflammatory Responses. Its focus is pathogens – bacteria, viruses and microorganisms – and the disease responses they cause in humans. The latest award continues funding of the center, with individual projects on cancer, Lyme disease, pneumonic plague and chlamydial infection. Smeltzer and Richard P. Morrison, chairman of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the UAMS College of Medicine, co-direct the center. "Everything that we do, at the end of the day, it's really about human health," Smeltzer said in a news relesase. "We're trying to understand how microorganisms and pathogens cause disease in humans, and if you understand that, you’re that much closer to coming up with useful treatments." COBRE grants are only available for Institutional Development Award (IDeA) states where NIH funding has been historically low. UAMS is host to two other centers funded by COBRE grants: the Center for Translational Neuroscience, and the Center fo...
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - Category: American Health Source Type: news

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ult D Abstract One quarter of all cancers are linked to infectious diseases. The link between viral infection and cancer has been widely studied, but few reports have focused on the carcinogenic role of bacterial infection. Nonetheless, Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia psittaci, Coxiella burnetii, Borrelia burgdorferi and Campylobacter jejuni are bacteria that can be associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), the most common haematologic malignancy. Here, we review the evidence in favour of a link between these bacterial infections and NHL. Sero-epidemiological observation makes it possible to identify a link bet...
Source: Critical Reviews in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Crit Rev Microbiol Source Type: research
This study delves into the mechanisms by which a short period of fasting can accelerate wound healing. Fasting triggers many of the same cellular stress responses, such as upregulated autophagy, as occur during the practice of calorie restriction. It isn't exactly the same, however, so it is always worth asking whether any specific biochemistry observed in either case does in fact occur in both situations. In particular, the period of refeeding following fasting appears to have beneficial effects that are distinct from those that occur while food is restricted. Multiple forms of therapeutic fasting have been repor...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, taller body height at the entry to adulthood, supposed to be a marker of early-life environment, is associated with lower risk of dementia diagnosis later in life. The association persisted when adjusted for educational level and intelligence test scores in young adulthood, suggesting that height is not just acting as an indicator of cognitive reserve. A Comparison of Biological Age Measurement Approaches https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/a-comparison-of-biological-age-measurement-approaches/ Researchers here assess the performance of a range of approaches to measuring biological...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The field of Alzheimer's disease research is in the midst of a slow-moving and consequential debate over the role of infection in the development of the condition. The fundamental question is this: in the absence of genetic variants that raise risk, why do only some people progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease? The presence - in only some people - of sufficient degrees of persistent infection is one possible answer to that question. Candidates include herpesviruses, oral bacteria such as P. gingivalis, lyme disease spirochetes, and others. Alzheimer's is a condition characterized by amyloid-β aggregation i...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) Lyme disease is far more common than many of us realize. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that around 300,000 people are diagnosed with this bacterial infection each year. That’s over 1.5 times more people than the total number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and about six times...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have developed a 3D printed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) device, which fits onto a normal pipette and substantially reduces the time and cost of this common medical test. The device could allo...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Genetics Materials Medicine Pathology Source Type: blogs
I was speaking with someone recently who has a series of chronic and painful conditions; some of which are noticeable and some ‘invisible’. What is particularly distressful is that people sometimes say to her, “At least you don’t have cancer.” How dismissive is that? I know they are trying to help her feel better about what she does have and perhaps even attempt to minimize the impact, but it is not compassionate or helpful. There are diagnoses such as fibromyalgia, lupus, diabetes, arthritis or neuropathy which some people have to navigate. It might mean taking naps on an as-needed basis, en...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Inspiration & Hope Personal Arthritis Chronic Illness Diabetes Fibromyalgia Lupus Lyme disease neuropathy peer support Source Type: blogs
In this study, the proteomic profile of the surface-associated proteins from M. bovis BCG Moreau was compared to the BCG Pasteur reference strain. The methodology used was 2DE gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry techniques (MALDI-TOF/TOF), leading to the identification of 115 proteins. Of these, 24 proteins showed differential expression between the two BCG strains. Furthermore, 27 proteins previously described as displaying moonlighting function were identified, 8 of these proteins showed variation in abundance comparing BCG Moreau to Pasteur and 2 of them presented two different domain hits. Moonlighting ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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