A global pandemic has a 50 percent chance of wiping out human civilization, reveals online odds firm

(Natural News) For thousands of years, mankind has been trying to predict the way in which the world as we know it will come to an end. Some look at the story of Noah and the Flood in the Bible and predict that the end of times will come in the form of a major...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Some recent things...Global healthExploring the equity impact of a maternal and newborn health intervention: a qualitative study of participatory women ’s groups in rural South Asia and AfricaBaby ‐Friendly Community Initiative—From National Guidelines to Implementation: A Multisectoral Platform for Improving Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices and Integrated Health ServicesA study in KenyaExpanding the Agenda for Addressing Mistreatment in Maternity Care: A Mapping Review and Gender AnalysisAuditNational Maternity and Perinatal Audit Organisational Report 2019 (HQIP)Second report from this audit. &...
Source: Browsing - Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: The clinical features and outcomes of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza and current circulating seasonal influenza A strains were comparable in hospitalised patients. However, since both seasonal and pandemic influenza can lead to significant morbidity and mortality, the impact of pre-existing seasonal influenza should not be underestimated during the pandemic period. PMID: 31304711 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Assoc Physicians India Source Type: research
This article evaluates the textual evidence for bubonic plague in classical antiquity from medical sources and discusses methodologies for "retrospective diagnosis" in light of new developments in microbiology. A close study of Greek medical texts suggests that bubonic plague was unfamiliar to medical writers until sometime before the second century AD, when sources cited by Rufus of Ephesus report a disease that resembles bubonic plague. Rufus of Ephesus describes this disease around AD 100, and Aretaeus (fl. ca. AD 50 or 150) appears to describe the same disease as well. Intriguingly, the disease then disappear...
Source: Medical History - Category: History of Medicine Authors: Tags: Bull Hist Med Source Type: research
After the initial identification of the H1N1 pandemic influenza strain in Mexico in April 2009 and its subsequent global spread, several monovalent influenza vaccines were developed as part of the pandemic response. Three of these vaccines, Pandemrix, Arepanrix and Focetria were adjuvanted. One of these, the AS03-adjuvanted Pandemrix vaccine, was primarily used in Europe. Following widespread Pandemrix vaccine administration in Scandinavia, an increased risk of narcolepsy was noted in observational studies. Subsequently, this increased risk was also reported in other European countries as well. In contrast, studies from Ca...
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Vaccine Reports Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 July 2019Source: Molecular and Cellular EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Marta G. Novelle, Carlos DiéguezAbstractIn an obesity pandemic context, eating disorders (ED) have arisen as serious illnesses associated with severe disturbances and has a clear gender dependent bias. In this manuscript, we provide an overview of the oestrogen role in the homeostatic and hedonic control of food intake. We draw attention to the role of oestrogens in the various reward processes and their possible implication in the development of ED, a condition much more common in women. In here, we have summarized...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Global growth in antibiotic resistance is a major social problem. A high level of resistance to fluoroquinolones requires the concurrent presence of at least 3 mutations in the target proteins—2 in DNA gyrase (GyrA) and 1 in topoisomerase IV (ParC), which occur in a stepwise manner. In the Escherichia coli...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: PNAS Plus Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 July 2019Source: Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and TraumaAuthor(s): Nipith Charoenngam, Arash Shirvani, Michael F. HolickAbstractVitamin D plays an essential role in regulating calcium and phosphate metabolism and maintaining a healthy mineralized skeleton. Humans obtain vitamin D from sunlight exposure, dietary foods and supplements. There are two forms of vitamin D: vitamin D3 and vitamin D2. Vitamin D3 is synthesized endogenously in the skin and found naturally in oily fish and cod liver oil. Vitamin D2 is synthesized from ergosterol and found in yeast and mushrooms. Once vitamin...
Source: Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Contributors : R E Drury ; D O'Connor ; A PollardSeries Type : Non-coding RNA profiling by arrayOrganism : Homo sapiensTo describe vaccine associated changes in the expression of microRNAs 21 days after vaccination in children receiving one of two pandemic influenza (H1N1) vaccines.
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Non-coding RNA profiling by array Homo sapiens Source Type: research
ConclusionsMechanisms responsible for nonhemolysis of the epidemic O1 El Tor strains are complex and not only confined to gene mutation but also deficiencies of transcription and extracellular transport of HlyA. Mutations in gene regulation and protein secretion systems of HlyA in the nonhemolyticV. cholerae strains should be areas of concern in future studies.
Source: Gut Pathogens - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Mamelund During epidemics, the poorest part of the population usually suffers the most. Alfred Crosby noted that the norm changed during the 1918 influenza pandemic in the US: The black population (which were expected to have higher influenza morbidity and mortality) had lower morbidity and mortality than the white population during the autumn of 1918. Crosby’s explanation for this was that black people were more exposed to a mild spring/summer wave of influenza earlier that same year. In this paper, we review the literature from the pandemic of 1918 to better understand the crossover in the role of race on ...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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