Isolation of Swine Influenza Virus in Cell Cultures and Embryonated Chicken Eggs

Influenza virus isolation is a procedure to obtain a live and infectious virus that can be used for antigenic characterization, pathogenesis investigation, and vaccine production. Embryonated chicken egg inoculation is traditionally considered the “gold standard” method for influenza virus isolation and propagation. However, many primary cells and continuous cell lines have also been examined or developed for influenza virus isolation and replication. Specifically, swine influenza virus (SIV) isolation and propagation have been attempted and compared in embryonated chicken eggs, some primary porcine cells, and a number of continuous cell lines. Currently Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells remain the most commonly used cell line for isolation, propagation, and titration of SIV. Virus isolation in embryonated chicken eggs or in different cell lines offers alternative approaches when SIV isolation in MDCK cells is unsuccessful. Nasal swabs, lung tissues, and oral fluids are three major specimen types for SIV isolation. In this chapter, we describe the procedures of sample processing, SIV isolation in MDCK cells and in embryonated chicken eggs, as well as methods used for confirming the virus isolation results.
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Related Links:

Mark K. Slifka1* and Ian J. Amanna2 1Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, Beaverton, OR, United States2Najít Technologies, Inc., Beaverton, OR, United States Vaccines play a vital role in protecting our communities against infectious disease. Unfortunately, some vaccines provide only partial protection or in some cases vaccine-mediated immunity may wane rapidly, resulting in either increased susceptibility to that disease or a requirement for more booster vaccinations in order to maintain immunity above a protective level. The durability of a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In conclusion, the reported results highlight the importance of AIV attachment to trachea in many avian species. Finally, the importance of chickens and mallards in AIVs dynamics was illustrated by the abundant AIV attachment observed. Introduction Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are pathogens of global concern in both human and veterinary medicine (Webster et al., 1992; Stöhr, 2002; Olsen et al., 2006; Wiethoelter et al., 2015). Wild birds are well-described hosts of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) and longitudinal surveillance studies have demonstrated a plethora of low pathogenic AIVs (LPAIVs) circulating in wild...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
María Maximina B. Moreno-Altamirano1*, Simon E. Kolstoe2 and Francisco Javier Sánchez-García1* 1Laboratorio de Inmunorregulación, Departamento de Inmunología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City, Mexico 2School of Health Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, United Kingdom Over the last decade, there has been significant advances in the understanding of the cross-talk between metabolism and immune responses. It is now evident that immune cell effector function strongly depends on the metabolic pathway in w...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, we exposed apically well-differentiated human NECs cultured at the ALI to the related flaviviruses ZIKV, JEV, WNV, and Usutu virus (USUV). We selected these viruses due to the recent increasing evidences of potential threat to humans (Cadar et al., 2017; Simonin et al., 2018). We show that NECs are particularly susceptible to JEV and WNV infection and to other flaviviruses included in this study. Infection with each virus led to shedding of infectious virus particles through the apical and basolateral surfaces and triggered host mechanisms at the level of inflammatory and antiviral mediators. Given...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, we used a swine pH1N1 challenge virus to investigate the efficacy of whole inactivated virus vaccines homologous or heterologous to the challenge virus as well as a commercial vaccine. We found that vaccine-mediated protection was most effective when vaccine antigen and challenge virus were homologous and correlated with the specific production of neutralising antibodies and a cellular response to the challenge virus. We conclude that a conventional whole inactivated SwIV vaccine must be antigenically matched to the challenge strain to be an effective control measure. PMID: 30914224 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
By MARC M. BEUTTLER, MD Every year at this time, you hear warnings that flu season has arrived. New data from the CDC indicates the season is far from over. So, you are urged by health authorities to get a flu shot. What you may not realize is how the flu can affect the hospitals you and your loved ones rely on for care.   In January, the large urban hospital where I am an intern faced the worst flu outbreak it has ever seen. Nearly 100 staff members tested positive for the flu. Residents assigned to back-up coverage were called to work daily to supplement the dwindling ranks of the sick. Every hospital vis...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Hospitals Medical Practice Marc Beuttler Vaccination Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 12 March 2019Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Svenja Mamerow, Robert Scheffter, Susanne Röhrs, Olga Stech, Ulrike Blohm, Theresa Schwaiger, Charlotte Schröder, Reiner Ulrich, Jan Schinköthe, Martin Beer, Thomas C. Mettenleiter, Jürgen StechAbstractInfluenza A viruses (IAV) have caused seasonal epidemics and severe pandemics in humans. Novel pandemic strains as in 2009 may emerge from pigs, serving as perpetual virus reservoir. However, reliably effective vaccination has remained a key issue for humans and swine. Here, we generated a novel double-attenuated inf...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
zhu Ren Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the etiological agent that causes porcine circovirus diseases and porcine circovirus-associated diseases (PCVD/PCVAD), which are present in every major swine-producing country in the world. PCV2 infections may downregulate the host immune system and enhance the infection and replication of other pathogens. However, the exact mechanisms of PCVD/PCVAD are currently unknown. To date, many studies have reported that several cofactors, such as other swine viruses or bacteria, vaccination failure, and stress or crowding, in combination with PCV2, lead to PCVD/PCVAD. Among these cofactor...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
(CNN) — From climate change to superbugs, the World Health Organization has laid out 10 big threats to our global health in 2019. And unless these threats get addressed, millions of lives will be in jeopardy. Here’s a snapshot of 10 urgent health issues, according to the United Nations’ public health agency: Not vaccinating when you can One of the most controversial recent health topics in the US is now an international concern. “Vaccine hesitancy — the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines — threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-prevent...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 3 January 2019Source: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and MedicineAuthor(s): Santosh Dhakal, Fangjia Lu, Shristi Ghimire, Sankar Renu, Yashavanth Shaan Laxmanappa, Bradley T. Hogshead, Darryl Ragland, Harm HogenEsch, Gourapura J. RenukaradhyaAbstractAdjuvant potential of positively charged corn-derived nanoparticles (Nano-11) was earlier revealed in mice. We evaluated its adjuvant role to electrostatically adsorbed inactivated/killed swine influenza virus antigen (KAg) (Nano-11 + KAg) in pigs. Nano-11 facilitated the uptake of KAg by antigen presenting cells and induced se...
Source: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine - Category: Nanotechnology Source Type: research
More News: Infectious Diseases | Influenza | Influenza Vaccine | Swine Flu | Swine Flu (H1N1) Vaccine | Urology & Nephrology | Vaccines