Evaluation of agreement between tests for the diagnosis of leprosy

Conclusion: The high sensitivity of PCR decreases the agreement with other tests.RESUMO Introdu ção: A hanseníase é uma doença infecciosa crônica causada pelo parasita intracelular Mycobacterium leprae. O diagnóstico é essencialmente clínico, com base em sintomas, exame da pele, nervos periféricos e história epidemiológica. Testes laboratoriais são realizados para complementar o r esultado de diagnóstico clínico, ou mesmo servindo como método de confirmação. Objetivo: Investigar a positividade e a concordância da baciloscopia, do ensaio de imunoadsorvente ligado à enzima (ELISA) com o antígeno sintético ND-O-BSA, do ML Flow e da reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR ) para a detecção de Mycobacterium leprae em casos novos de hanseníase. Métodos: Foi realizada uma série de casos, avaliando uma amostra de conveniência de 39 novos casos de hanseníase e um grupo-controle de 18 contatos domiciliares em Belém (PA) e Igarapé-Açu (PA) a partir de março 2014 a setembro de 2015. Resultados: A concordância entre as combinações ELISA, ML Flow e PCR mostrou reprodutibilidade leve a ausente (Kappa ≤ 0,24). Os resultados mostraram maior sensibilidade no ensaio de PCR, com maior positividade em casos multibacilares. O teste ELISA mos...
Source: Jornal Brasileiro de Patologia e Medicina Laboratorial - Category: Pathology Source Type: research

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Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the surrounding environment (soil and water) of leprosy patients contain viable M. leprae and the viability has association with Acanthamoeba which may provide a protective niche for M. leprae. This could play an important role in the focal transmission of the disease. PMID: 30658215 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Microbial Pathogenesis, Volume 124Author(s): Mukul Sharma, Madhusmita Das, D. Diana, Anna Wedderburn, Roy AnindyaAbstractMycobacterium leprae is an unculturable obligate pathogen and causative agent for debilitating human disease leprosy. Due to reductive genome evolution M leprae genome harbours large number of pseudogenes and small number of genes (∼1600 genes and ∼1300 pseudogenes). How M leprae remained a successful human parasite with small set of genes remains poorly understood and provided us the impetus to investigate the intergenic regions of M leprae genome for the p...
Source: Microbial Pathogenesis - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe results lead us to suggest a regulatory role forCR1 polymorphisms on mRNA and sCR1 levels, with haplotype-specific effects increasing susceptibility to leprosy, probably by enhancing parasite phagocytosis and inflammation.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 235 and infectious diseases / animal theme. Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1: What tropical disease will give you Leopard or Lizard skin? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('dde...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Frivolous Friday Five bull neck diphtheria Elephantiasis leonine facies leopard skin leprosy lion facies lizard skin lymphatic filariasis marasmus monkey facies onchocerciasis Source Type: blogs
Conclusions and significanceIn patients with TL, coinfection is frequent, it can lead to diagnostic errors and delays, and it can influence the effectiveness and safety of treatment. More research is needed to unravel how coinfections interfere with the pathogenesis of TL.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that primarily affects peripheral nerves, and the skin, but can also compromise functions of the eyes and other organs. Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) is the etiological agent and an obligate intracellular parasite [1]. Leprosy remains a serious public health problem in developing countries, such as India, Brazil and Indonesia, and it is endemic in Africa, Asia and Latin America [2].
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Leprosy is a chronic infectious and neurological disease [1,2] that affects around 200,000 people each year [3]. The pathogen, Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), is an obligate intracellular parasite with an extremely eroded genome [4,5]. Nearly 50% of coding genes in M. leprae genome, especially these genes in energy metabolic pathways, were pseudogenized or lost [4,5]. This evolutionary event led to an essential dependence of the host energy metabolites and nutritional products for the survival of M.
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. UTUT FOREST, Kenya ― Amos Kiptui is no stranger to hardship. He was born in a cave 27 years ago and still lives in one, despite run-ins with wild buffalo, deadly snakes, leopards and lions.  So when thick, itchy welts began to appear on Kiptui’s right cheek, he took a sharp rock and scraped off layers of his skin, then packed the bleeding wound with traditional medicine made from bitter leaves.  “You put the leaves on a piece of iron and make a fire,&r...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. YANGON, Myanmar ― Su Myant Sandar was 17 when she first noticed a red patch on her cheek. At the time, she was working with her girlfriends at a garment factory on the poor outskirts of this city. She covered the spot with a thick layer of thanaka, a traditional plant-based makeup, and continued going to work as normal. But it was not an ordinary spot. It was the first visible sign of leprosy, a largely forgotten bacterial infection that affects tens of thousands of people every...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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