Infertility: There could be a 3D printing solution

Northwestern University researchers 3D printed gelatin to create a scaffold for a bioprosthetic mouse ovary [Image courtesy of Northwestern University]New Northwestern University research offers a potential 3D printing solution for women’s infertility – providing hope for cancer survivors who want to start families. The Northwestern researchers successfully 3D printed a bioprosthetic mouse ovary that ovulated when implanted inside a live mouse. Mice with the bioprosthetic ovaries were able to give birth to live pups, and even produce milk for them thanks to hormones produced by the 3D printed ovaries. “This research shows these bioprosthetic ovaries have long-term, durable function,” said Teresa K. Woodruff, a reproductive scientist and director of the Women’s Health Research Institute at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “Using bioengineering, instead of transplanting from a cadaver, to create organ structures that function and restore the health of that tissue for that person, is the holy grail of bioengineering for regenerative medicine,” Woodruff said in a news release. Get the full story on our sister site, Medical Design &Outsourcing. The post Infertility: There could be a 3D printing solution appeared first on MassDevice.
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Prosthetics Regenerative Medicine Research & Development Women's Health 3D printing bioprinting infertility Northwestern University Source Type: news

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Authors: Dolmans MM, Masciangelo R Abstract Improvements in cancer treatments have increased the chances of survival of young cancer patients, but have given rise to other issues, like premature ovarian insufficiency and infertility. Preservation and subsequent restoration of ovarian function in these patients is now possible thanks to ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation. However, safety concerns about the possible presence of cancerous cells in the tissue to be cryopreserved must be addressed. Indeed, reimplantation of malignant cell-contaminated ovarian tissue could potentially lead to recurrence ...
Source: Minerva Ginecologica - Category: OBGYN Tags: Minerva Ginecol Source Type: research
Although cancer remains a critical health concern, significant medical advances in cancer detection and treatment have improved survival rates for patients. In children receiving total body radiation (TBI), bone-marrow transplant (BMT), or cyclophosphamide equivalent dose (CED) of>4,000mg/m2, the risk of infertility is significant. The National Physicians Cooperative (NPC) has published site-specific articles compiling data regarding use of cryopreserved tissue, return of endocrine function, and pregnancy outcomes, however no comprehensive review has been conducted.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a relatively rare genetic condition with primary sequelae of bone marrow failure, hematologic malignancies, and squamous cell cancers (SCC) of head/neck, breast, and anogenital tract. Many patients require hematopoietic stem cell transplant (bone marrow transplant, BMT) to treat marrow dysfunction, but risk of future malignancies remains. Female patients are at risk of reproductive complications, including infertility related to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) and gynecologic cancers.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Although cancer remains a critical health concern, significant medical advances in cancer detection and treatment have improved survival rates for patients. In children receiving total body radiation (TBI), bone-marrow transplant (BMT), or cyclophosphamide equivalent dose (CED) of>4,000mg/m2, the risk of infertility is significant. The National Physicians Cooperative (NPC) has published site-specific articles compiling data regarding use of cryopreserved tissue, return of endocrine function, and pregnancy outcomes, however no comprehensive review has been conducted.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a relatively rare genetic condition with primary sequelae of bone marrow failure, hematologic malignancies, and squamous cell cancers (SCC) of head/neck, breast, and anogenital tract. Many patients require hematopoietic stem cell transplant (bone marrow transplant, BMT) to treat marrow dysfunction, but risk of future malignancies remains. Female patients are at risk of reproductive complications, including infertility related to primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) and gynecologic cancers.
Source: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
A second woman in the U.S. born without a uterus has given birth to a baby, thanks to a uterus transplant. The birth took place at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, a part of Baylor Scott &White, which performed the first birth via uterus transplant late last year. The baby, born in February, is a girl. The hospital is not revealing the identity of the mother, but says the pregnancy and birth were uncomplicated. The birth is the second in the hospital’s ongoing uterus transplant clinical trial. The women in the trial have absolute uterine factor infertility (AUI), which means their uterus is nonfunction...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized fertility healthytime onetime Source Type: news
In this study, we review germ cell toxicity, which occurs during the treatment of hematologic malignancies, and propose guidelines for fertility preservation in younger patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID: 29376015 [PubMed]
Source: Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine - Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: Clin Exp Reprod Med Source Type: research
(Springer) Belgian researchers have taken important steps towards creating transplantable artificial ovaries. Once successful, these could be of value to women struggling with infertility or cancer patients who cannot conceive after undergoing radiation or chemotherapy. The research team has identified a protein formulation that closely resembles the structure and rigidity of the natural tissue lining a woman's ovaries, says Marie-Madeleine Dolmans of the Universit é Catholique de Louvain in Belgium, in an article in Springer's Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Abstract Infertile couples including cancer survivors stand to benefit from gametes differentiated from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem (ES/iPS) cells. It remains challenging to convert human ES/iPS cells into primordial germ-like cells (PGCLCs) en route to obtaining gametes. Considerable success was achieved in 2016 to obtain fertile offspring starting with mouse ES/iPS cells, however the specification of human ES/iPS cells into PGCLCs in vitro is still not achieved. Human ES cells will not yield patient-specific gametes unless and until hES cells are derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (therapeutic cl...
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
Authors: O'Donoghue C, Quinn GP, Lee MC Abstract As more young women survive breast cancer, fertility preservation (FP) is an important component of care. This review highlights the importance of early pretreatment referral, reviews the risks of infertility associated with breast cancer treatment, and defines existing and emerging techniques for FP. The techniques reviewed include ovarian suppression, embryo cryopreservation, oocyte cryopreservation, and ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation. The barriers women face, such as not being appropriately referred and the costs of treatment, also are address...
Source: Southern Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: South Med J Source Type: research
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