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4 Women On What It's Really Like To Live With A Mental Illness

Opening up about struggles with mental illness can be a daunting task. Many people don’t feel comfortable doing it ― even though such illnesses are quite common.  About 1 in 5 adults in the United States experience mental illness in a given year, and 1 in 25 adults will have a debilitating mental illness that can interfere with their daily lives. Although mental illness can affect anyone, women are at a higher risk for many conditions, including anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. They’re also 70 percent more likely than men to experience depression. In an effort to encourage more people to share their struggles, we talked to four women about diagnosis and treatment for a variety of mental health issues. Here’s what they’ve learned along the way and what they wish others knew: Kathleen Halliday Location: Inwood, New York What condition do you have? Bipolar disorder (rapid cycling with psychotic features), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and an eating disorder What was your journey to diagnosis? I was always anxious as a kid. I used to tell my mom I felt bad because I didn’t know how to verbalize it. I first saw a therapist in middle school, which is where I got the GAD diagnosis. My bipolar diagnosis was rockier in that it was preceded by a manic episode. Bipolar disorder was one of my biggest fears before that, but I didn’t really think I would develop it. As for the eating disorder, I had realized I had &...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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“The simplification of life is one of the steps to inner peace. A persistent simplification will create an inner and outer well-being that places harmony in one’s life.” Peace Pilgrim “Peace is the result of retraining your mind to process life as it is, rather than as you think it should be.” Wayne Dyer The daily life can be busy, hectic and at times overwhelming. It may sometimes feel like bringing just a little more inner peace and calmness into your life is a hopeless wish. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Small and smart changes can over time make a big difference. So today I&rsq...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Career & Work Habits Happiness Personal Development Productivity Relaxation Success Source Type: blogs
Authors: Tanaka M, Maeba H, Senoo T, Iwasaka J, Ohkita A, Kita H, Uchitani K, Hirota Y Abstract A 67-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy and renal insufficiency was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea secondary to end-stage heart failure. We introduced oxycodone for medically refractory dyspnea instead of morphine because of the patient's renal insufficiency. After the administration of oxycodone, his dyspnea was alleviated without any adverse opioid effects, such as respiratory depression. After treating his heart failure, he was able to leave the intensive care unit. Oxycodone may therefore be a reliable a...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Authors: Nakagawa S, Shimoyama T, Nakamura M, Chiba D, Kikuchi H, Sawaya M, Chinda D, Mikami T, Fukuda S Abstract A reddish depressed lesion was found in the corpus of the stomach of a 56-year-old man. Gastric biopsy showed no findings of MALT lymphoma, including lympho-epithelial lesions. A urea breath test, stool antigen test and serum IgG antibody to Helicobacter pylori test were negative. Magnifying endoscopy using narrow-band-imaging showed no malignant structures. Gastric biopsy specimens were subjected to immunohistochemistry and a PCR, which identified Helicobacter suis infection. Triple therapy with esomep...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Abstract Despite evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is effective, some individuals do not experience clinically significant reduction or remission of their PTSD symptoms. These individuals may return for additional PTSD-focused psychotherapy. However, there is no research to know whether PTSD treatment repeaters have worse symptoms prior to the initial treatment episode or display differences in other pretreatment characteristics versus nonrepeaters. Research is also needed to explore whether treatment repeaters exhibit PTSD symptom changes during an initial o...
Source: Behavior Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research
We examined whether self-reported PA and NA accounted for unique variance in the association between social anxiety and depressive symptoms across three groups (individuals with remitted bipolar disorder, type I [BD; n = 32], individuals with remitted major depressive disorder [MDD; n = 31], and nonpsychiatric controls [n = 30]) at baseline and follow-ups of 6 and 12 months. Low levels of PA, but not NA, accounted for unique variance in both concurrent and prospective associations between social anxiety and depression in the BD group; in contrast, high levels of NA, but not PA, accounted for unique variance in concurrent a...
Source: Behavior Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research
Abstract The current study examined the role negative self-statements have on the comorbidity between anxious symptomatology and ADHD-combined presentation (ADHD-C) and ADHD-predominantly inattentive (ADHD-I). A total of 114 children and adolescents with ADHD (M age = 10.15; SD = 2.30; range = 7-16) from a clinic-referred sample were grouped based on a semistructured diagnostic interview and consensus approach (ADHD-C, n = 62; ADHD-I, n = 52). Negative self-statements were measured using the Children's Automatic Thoughts Scale and the total score from the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children was used to mea...
Source: Behavior Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Future directions are provided for compassion research, including the need for improved methodological rigor, larger scale RCTs, increased specificity on the targets of compassion, and examination of compassion across the lifespan. Although further research is warranted, the current state of evidence highlights the potential benefits of compassion-based interventions on a range of outcomes. PMID: 29029675 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Behavior Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research
Abstract Although research indicates that anxious arousal in response to feared stimuli is related to treatment outcome (Heimberg et al., 1990), less is known about the patterns of anxious arousal. We identified patterns of anxious arousal in individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) at pre- (n= 61) and posttreatment (n= 40; 12-session CBGT, Heimberg &Becker, 2002), and in non-anxious controls (NACs; n= 31) using an assessment speech task administered at pretreatment (SAD) or the pretreatment equivalent (NACs), as well as at posttreatment (SAD only). We identified nine patterns of anxious arousal across g...
Source: Behavior Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research
Abstract Difficulties with emotion regulation are central to borderline personality disorder (BPD). Recent research suggests that avoidance of emotions in general, and emotion suppression specifically, may be commonly used among those who meet criteria for the disorder. Contemporary behavioral interventions for BPD incorporate cognitive and behavioral skills to increase emotional experiencing and acceptance while decreasing behaviors that function to escape or avoid from emotions. Few studies, however, have experimentally examined the effects of instructed emotion suppression and acceptance in BPD. The present stu...
Source: Behavior Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research
Abstract Relapse following response in psychotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD) is a major concern. Emotion regulation (ER) has been discussed as a putative emerging and maintaining factor for depression. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether ER protects against recurrence of depression over and above residual symptoms of depression following inpatient care for MDD. ER skills (ERSQ-ES) and depression (HEALTH-49) were assessed in 193 patients with MDD (age, M = 47.4, SD = 9.6, 75.1% female, 100% Caucasian) at treatment discontinuation, 3 and 12 months after treatment. Multiple hierarchica...
Source: Behavior Therapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Behav Ther Source Type: research
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