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Motherhood, the Brain and Dementia: Changing Hormones Alter Risk

Throughout decades of study, hormone therapy (HT), often but not always the same as hormone replacement therapy (HRT), has been glorified and demonized in turn. The information that doctors receive has come from ongoing studies that seemed to offer over time radically conflicting results. A new study may add more confusion since this study has found that not only does HT given near menopause create changes in a woman’s brain, but motherhood itself creates changes. Read full article on how changing hormones can alter the risk of Alzheimer's: Support a caregiver or jump start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol  Related articles Coping with Criticism from the Loved One You Care For Proper Dementia Diagnosis May Require Referral to Specialist Male Caregivers Need Unique Support                Related StoriesIndividual Attention Important Benefit of Alzheimer's Eating StudyNighttime Snacks Stop Some Alzheimer's Wandering10 Tips to Ease Alzheimer's Sundowning 
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs

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In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TIGIT is a prominent negative immune regulator involved in immunosenescence. This novel finding is highly significant, as targeting TIGIT might be an effective strategy to improve the immune response and decrease age-related comorbidities. Delivery of Extracellular Vesicles as a Potential Basis for Therapies https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/01/delivery-of-extracellular-vesicles-as-a-potential-basis-for-therapies/ Here I'll point out a readable open access review paper on the potential use of extracellular vesicles as a basis for therapy: harveste...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
A deep-learning algorithm that analyzed FDG-PET and MR was able to differentiate...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Did PET scan confirm CTE in living NFL player? PET study links menopausal status to Alzheimer's AI predicts dementia years before symptoms occur Can AI diagnose Alzheimer's disease early? FDG-PET links physical activity to healthy brains
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
In this study, we integrated atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular approaches to determine whether increased stiffness of aortic VSMCs in hypertensive rats is ROCK-dependent, and whether the anti-hypertensive effect of ROCK inhibitors contributes to the reduction of aortic stiffness via changing VSMC mechanical properties. Despite a widely held belief that aortic stiffening is associated with changes in extracellular matrix proteins and endothelial dysfunction, our recent studies demonstrated that intrinsic stiffening of aortic VSMCs, independent of VSMC proliferation and migration, is an important contributo...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Introducing hormone treatment for women in early stages of menopause might help decrease their risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. For women, a drop in hormones during midlife may have some influence on developing dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Also, general brain volume gradually declines with advancing age, but the decline is faster in people who [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news
A new study looked at the metabolic changes in the brains of menopausal and perimenopausal women and found potential triggers for Alzheimer's disease.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news
DEMENTIA - including Alzheimer ’s disease - can affect anyone, however more women than men tend to suffer. Scientists have discovered that the menopause could be why.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
DEMENTIA - including Alzheimer ’s disease - can affect anyone, however more women than men tend to suffer. Scientists have discovered that the menopause could be why.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract Several lines of investigation have shown a protective role for estrogen in Alzheimer's disease through a number of biological actions. This review examines studies of the role of estrogen-related factors in age at onset and risk for Alzheimer's disease in women with Down syndrome, a population at high risk for early onset of dementia. The studies are consistent in showing that early age at menopause and that low levels of endogenous bioavailable estradiol in postmenopausal women with Down syndrome are associated with earlier age at onset and overall risk for dementia. Polymorphisms in genes associated wi...
Source: Free Radical Biology and Medicine - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Free Radic Biol Med Source Type: research
Authors: Ruan Q, D'onofrio G, Wu T, Greco A, Sancarlo D, Yu Z Abstract The aim of the present study was to assess systematically gender differences in susceptibility to frailty and cognitive performance decline, and the underlying mechanisms. A systematic assessment was performed of the identified reviews of cohort, mechanistic and epidemiological studies. The selection criteria of the present study included: i) Sexual dimorphism of frailty, ii) sexual dimorphism of subjective memory decline (impairment) and atrophy of hippocampus during early life, iii) sexual dimorphism of late‑onset Alzheimer's ...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research
Conclusion. A review of the literature suggests that there are adequate data supporting the efficacy and general safety of the low-dose use of trazodone for the treatment of insomnia. keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Keywords: insomnia, hypnotics, treatment, trazodone, sedative Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;14(9–10):24–34 Introduction Insomnia is characterized by difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or waking too early1 and is associated with significant impairments in daytime activities, which might occur despite adequate opportunities for sleep.2–6 Primary insom...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Review hypnotics insomnia sedative trazodone treatment Source Type: research
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