Recent advances in use of silver nanoparticles as antimalarial agents

Publication date: 30 June 2017 Source:International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Volume 526, Issues 1–2 Author(s): Mahendra Rai, Avinash P. Ingle, Priti Paralikar, Indarchand Gupta, Serenella Medici, Carolina A. Santos Malaria is one of the most common infectious diseases, which has become a great public health problem all over the world. Ineffectiveness of available antimalarial treatment is the main reason behind its menace. The failure of current treatment strategies is due to emergence of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and drug toxicity in human beings. Therefore, the development of novel and effective antimalarial drugs is the need of the hour. Considering the huge biomedical applications of nanotechnology, it can be potentially used for the malarial treatment. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have demonstrated significant activity against malarial parasite (P. falciparum) and vector (female Anopheles mosquito). It is believed that AgNPs will be a solution for the control of malaria. This review emphasizes the pros- and cons of existing antimalarial treatments and in depth discussion on application of AgNPs for treatment of malaria. The role of nanoparticles for site specific drug delivery and toxicological issues have also been discussed. Graphical abstract
Source: International Journal of Pharmaceutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

Related Links:

AbstractEgypt has successfully eliminated malaria during 2010 –2013, however, between May to mid-June 2014, an outbreak was reported in Al-Adwa village, Aswan Governorate indicating that malaria may be potentially re-emerging in the country. The aim of this work was to reevaluate malaria in Al-Adwa and surrounding villages, 1 year after malaria cases have b een reported through entomological and human screening in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and Population. Four trips were conducted during the period from March 2015 to March 2016. Mosquitoes were collected, sorted and identified.Anopheles species w...
Source: Journal of Parasitic Diseases - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
At the close of the 2014-2016 West Africa Ebola crisis, the Paul G. Allen Foundation identified diagnostic gaps as one of the major deficiencies that had contributed to the outbreak’s spread. “The standard diagnostic tests that exist are very good, but they’re hard to do out in the field in the middle of an outbreak like we saw in West Africa,” said John Connor, a virologist at the Boston University National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory (NEIDL). Instead, samples need to be sent to a facility capable of running the tests, which means it could...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: IVD Source Type: news
For the success of the malaria control and eradication programme it is essential to reduce parasite transmission by mosquito vectors. In the midguts of mosquitoes fed with parasite-infected blood, sexual-stage...
Source: Malaria Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Natural infections of the endosymbiont bacteria Wolbachia have recently been discovered in populations of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae (s.l.) in Burkina Faso and Mali, West Africa. This Anopheles specif...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Short report Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 December 2018Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and WildlifeAuthor(s): Ravinder N.M. SehgalAbstractOver the past 10 years, much research has been done and remarkable discoveries have been made in various fields of research regarding wildlife malaria parasites (Plasmodium, Plasmodiidae) and related haemosporidians, the agents of infections, which affect all major groups of terrestrial vertebrates. Recent molecular studies show that these blood parasites cause more harm to wildlife than formerly believed, calling for new fundamental and applied research on this sub...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
​BY GREGORY TAYLOR, DO; DAWN ZELENKA-JOSHOWITZ, DO; &ANDREW TAECKER, DOA 34-year-old man presented with intermittent fever and body aches for 10 days. He had been visiting family in India, and the symptoms began when he returned home. His fever had been as high as 104°F, and he was experiencing nausea, two episodes of bilious emesis, body aches, nonspecific abdominal pain, and multiple episodes of watery, nonbloody diarrhea.He said he knew of no tuberculosis exposure or ill contacts, and he was current on his routine influenza and hepatitis A vaccines. His temperature was 101.4°F (he had taken acetaminophen t...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
(Kanazawa University) Currently, few antimalarial treatments exist that effectively kill liver-stage malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax, which can lay dormant for months or even years. Researchers at Kanazawa University have reported a new drug that could eliminate liver-stage malaria parasites completely. Using an insect virus, known as a baculovirus, the researchers investigated the ability of baculovirus to mediate innate immunity against malaria infection. This work could pave the way for developing new and more effective antimalarial treatments.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
In recent years, human infection by the simian malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi has increased in Southeast Asia, leading to growing concerns regarding the cross-species spread of the parasite. Consequently, a...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated how the two organelle's separation is affected when the pressure of the nitrogen gas to disrupt the Plasmodium cells by nitrogen cavitation method is lowered from the pressure regularly applied (1200 psi). The parasite cell was sufficiently disrupted even when nitrogen cavitation was carried out at 300 psi. The obtained mitochondrial sample was much less contaminated by DNA compared with the sample prepared using the gas at the regular pressure. After the fractionation by Percoll density gradient, the mitochondrion and the apicoplast from the 300 psi cell lysate exhibited different sepa...
Source: Parasitology International - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Instead of mind-boggling inventions, 2018 was the year when national governments, as well as healthcare regulators, started to embrace digital health technologies at scale. The year when Google, Amazon, Apple or Microsoft competed head-to-head for the biggest chunks on the healthcare market, and when the buzzword of the year award went to the blockchain. Here’s our guide to the top digital health stories from last year. 2018: Under the spell of cosmos and microcosmos Every year, The Medical Futurist team sits down and collects the top stories of the past 12 months in healthcare. We put the novelties under the microsc...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers Researchers Top Lists 2018 AI artificial intelligence artificial pancreas blockchain chatbot CRISPR deep learning diabetes digital health digital he Source Type: blogs
More News: Drugs & Pharmacology | Infectious Diseases | International Medicine & Public Health | Malaria | Men | Nanotechnology | Parasitic Diseases | Parasitology | Toxicology