Screening has prevented half a million colorectal cancers

(Yale University) An estimated half a million cancers were prevented by colorectal cancer screening in the United States from 1976 to 2009, report researchers from the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale Cancer Center. Their study appears in the journal Cancer.During this more than 30-year time span, as increasing numbers of men and women underwent cancer screening tests -- including fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopies, and colonoscopies -- colorectal cancer rates declined significantly, the researchers found.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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ConclusionsScreening colonoscopy was associated with greater reductions in CRC mortality than screening sigmoidoscopy, and with a greater reduction in the distal than the proximal colon. These results provide additional information on the relative benefits of screening for CRC with sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy.
Source: International Journal of Colorectal Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
This study included PWH and demographically matched persons without HIV who were aged 50–75 years during 2005–2016 and had no previous CRC screening. We evaluated time to first CRC screening (fecal test, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy). We also assessed detection of adenoma and CRC with sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy by HIV status, accounting for CRC risk factors including sex, age, race/ethnicity, number of outpatient visits, smoking, body mass index, type-2 diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease. Among PWH, we evaluated whether CD4 count (
Source: JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 April 2019Source: Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Chen Chen, Christian Stock, Lina Jansen, Jenny Chang-Claude, Michael Hoffmeister, Hermann BrennerAbstractAn increasing number of countries have recently introduced colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs. Typically, one specific screening exam, such as fecal occult blood test (FOBT) or flexible sigmoidoscopy, is offered as a primary screening test. We aimed to assess trends in FOBT and colonoscopy use in Germany following the introduction of the offer of screening colonoscopy as an alternative to FOBT in 2002. We used data from 4052 con...
Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a significant impact on public health owing to its high incidence, morbidity, and mortality.1 It is the third most common cancer in men and second in women, and in most countries the second leading cause of cancer-related death.1,2 The early detection and removal of precursor cancer lesions decreases CRC incidence and mortality. CRC screening has, therefore, been implemented in various countries worldwide.3 The selected modality varies per country or region and differs from primary colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy to noninvasive testing, in particular by means of a fecal immunochemical test (FIT).
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a significant impact on public health owing to its high incidence, morbidity, and mortality.1 It is the third most common cancer in men and second in women, and in most countries the second leading cause of cancer-related death.1,2 The early detection and removal of precursor cancer lesions decreases CRC incidence and mortality. CRC screening has, therefore, been implemented in various countries worldwide.3 The selected modality varies per country or region and differs from primary colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy to noninvasive testing, in particular by means of a fecal immunochemical test (FIT).
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
We examined Blacks, Asians, and Hispanics relative to Whites, and Females relative to Males (with race or ethnicity combined). We examined each state separately for evidence of disparities within states, to avoid confounding by geographic disparities. We expected that the net effect o f the policy changes and the targeted interventions over the decade would be to increase CRC screening by endoscopy, reducing disparities. We saw improvements over time (reduced disparities relative to Whites) for Blacks and Hispanics residing in several states, and improvements over time for Female s relative to Males in many states. For the...
Source: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Conclusion: In this study, the most common perceived barriers to return of screening fecal test kits were forgetfulness and lack of motivation. The most common perceived facilitators were live call reminders and postage-paid return envelopes. Understanding barriers and facilitators to FITs may be necessary to enhance cancer screening rates in underserved patient populations.
Source: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
Colonoscopy vs sigmoidoscopy vs stool tests: Real evidence lacking, but opinions prevail in the battle to keep mortality rates from colorectal cancer (CRC) as low as possible.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news
We describe the epidemiologic shifts of CRC incidence and mortality across age groups as well as the differences in clinicopathologic, molecular, treatment, and survival characteristics between young and older patients. Novel studies of the microbiome may elucidate bacterial causes of CRC carcinogenesis in younger individuals. Moving up the colonoscopy screening to age 45 in normal-risk individuals should prove beneficial in detecting more patients with early-onset CRC.SummaryWe favor the development of risk-adaptive screening decision algorithms and flexible sigmoidoscopy screening at age 40 given the predilection for lef...
Source: Current Oncology Reports - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In an updated review, we found that common CRC screening strategies and computed tomographic colonography continued to be cost-effective compared to no screening. There were discrepancies among studies from different regions, which could be associated with the model types or model assumptions. PMID: 30659991 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Colorectal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
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