Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

The spectrum of REM sleep-related episodes in children with type 1 narcolepsy - Antelmi E, Pizza F, Vandi S, Neccia G, Ferri R, Bruni O, Filardi M, Cantalupo G, Liguori R, Plazzi G.

Type 1 narcolepsy is a central hypersomnia due to the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons and characterized by cataplexy, excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations and disturbed nocturnal sleep. In children, close to the dis...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Related Links:

In conclusion, narcolepsy type1 and hypersomnia associated with psychiatric disorder differ in the SWA dynamics. Narcoleptics presented with the altered dynamics of sleep homeostasis, whereas psychiatric hypersomniacs showed normal nocturnal sleep and normal sleep homeostasis. PMID: 28691719 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Acta Neurobiol Exp (Wars) Source Type: research
Abstract Experimental and clinical evidence suggests an association between neuroplasticity, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and sleep. We aimed at testing the hypotheses that brain-derived neurotrophic factor is associated with specific aspects of sleep architecture or sleep stages in patients with sleep disorders. We included 35 patients with primary insomnia, 31 patients with restless legs syndrome, 17 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia, 10 patients with narcolepsy and 37 healthy controls. Morning serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentrations were measured in patients and controls. In patients, blo...
Source: Journal of Sleep Research - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: J Sleep Res Source Type: research
This article reviews structural and functional brain imaging findings in narcolepsy and Kleine-Levin syndrome. Based on the current state of research, brain imaging is a useful tool to investigate and understand the neuroanatomic correlates and brain abnormalities of narcolepsy and other hypersomnia.
Source: Sleep Medicine Clinics - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is related to medical and social problems, including mental disorders, physical diseases, poor quality of life, and so forth. According to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition, diseases that result from EDS are narcolepsy type 1, narcolepsy type 2, idiopathic hypersomnia, hypersomnia due to a medical disorder, and others. EDS is usually treated using amphetamine-like central nervous system stimulants or modafinil and its R-enantiomer, armodafinil, wake-promoting compounds unrelated to amphetamines; a variety of new drugs are under development. The side effect...
Source: Sleep Medicine Clinics - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Narcolepsy is the most well-characterized hypersomnia in both clinical and basic research fields. Narcolepsy is caused by degeneration of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. Although hypocretin receptor antagonists have been developed as sleep-inducing drugs, a high dose of suvorexant, a hypocretin receptor antagonist, inhibits gene expression of prepro-hypocretin to induce narcoleptic attack in wild-type mice. Prostaglandin D2 is the most potent endogenous sleep-promoting substance. Overproduction of prostaglandin D2 is involved in hypersomnia in patients with mastocytosis and African sleeping sickness or in...
Source: Sleep Medicine Clinics - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Summary Experimental and clinical evidence suggests an association between neuroplasticity, brain‐derived neurotrophic factor and sleep. We aimed at testing the hypotheses that brain‐derived neurotrophic factor is associated with specific aspects of sleep architecture or sleep stages in patients with sleep disorders. We included 35 patients with primary insomnia, 31 patients with restless legs syndrome, 17 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia, 10 patients with narcolepsy and 37 healthy controls. Morning serum brain‐derived neurotrophic factor concentrations were measured in patients and controls. In patients, blood s...
Source: Journal of Sleep Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Regular Research Paper Source Type: research
Sleep is essential for children ’s learning, memory processes, school performance, and general well-being. The prevalence of sleepiness in children is about 4%. Reductions of sleep duration have daytime consequences, including sleepiness, behavior problems, cognitive deficits, poor school performance, inflammation, and metabolic dysfunction. Chronic pain, movement disorders, and sleep-disordered breathing may also lead to daytime somnolence, inattention, hyperactivity, oppositional behaviors, and mood dysregulation. Parent report questionnaires are useful tools to assess subjective sleepiness in children. Sleepiness ...
Source: Sleep Medicine Clinics - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: Group mean sleep latency for home modified MSLTs seems to be reliable compared with that for the attended sleep-laboratory setting. Higher rate of SOREMP in the unattended home suggests that napping in a familiar environment facilitates the transition into REM sleep. Further studies are needed to assess the normal limit, sensitivity, and specificity for SOREMP at home before the clinical utility of home-based napping can be determined.
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology - Category: Neurology Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
AbstractType 1 narcolepsy is a central hypersomnia due to the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons and characterized by cataplexy, excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations and disturbed nocturnal sleep. In children, close to the disease onset, type 1 narcolepsy has peculiar clinical features with severe cataplexy and a complex admixture of movement disorders occurring while awake. Motor dyscontrol during sleep has never been systematically investigated. Suspecting that abnormal motor control might affect also sleep, we systematically analysed motor events recorded by means of video polysomno...
Source: Brain - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Objective:Describe the risk factors for hypersomnia/narcolepsy and response to stimulant therapy in childhood brain tumor survivors.Background:Idiopathic hypersomnia and narcolepsy are diagnosed by mean sleep onset latency and numbers of sleep onset REM sleep episodes during multiple sleep latency testing (MSLT). Daytime sleepiness is recognized in brain tumor survivors but few studies have reported risk factors or response to therapy.Design/Methods:Institutional medical records were reviewed for all brain tumor survivors coded as having sleep disorder, hypersomnia or narcolepsy. Hypersomnia/narcolepsy were diagnosed accor...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neuro-oncology: Pediatric and Other Rare CNS Tumors Source Type: research
More News: Brain | Children | Hypersomnia | Narcolepsy | Neurology | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine