How The GOP's Health Plan Shifts The Burden To Family Caregivers

There are two words missing in the 100-plus pages of the American Health Care Act, which narrowly passed the House on Thursday without a single Democratic vote: “family caregivers.” It’s a shame, because the trickle-down effects of the bill ― should it pass the Senate ― would swell the ranks of the nation’s 43.5 million unpaid and untrained family members who sacrifice portions of their own lives and livelihoods to spare their loved ones being kicked to the curb. Many aspects of the Obamacare repeal uniquely target older Americans. But there’s one in particular that threatens to envelop us in a broad swath of misery: the change to how states handle Medicaid benefits. In a nutshell, Medicaid ― not Medicare ― pays for nursing home stays. In order to qualify for Medicaid, the patient must spend down his or her assets to just this side of zero, and then contribute whatever income they have, like Social Security, to the nursing home for payment. Medicaid is the primary support for 65 percent of nursing home residents, most of whom enter as private pay patients until they run out of money. It is the safety net for formerly middle-income people who worked hard all their lives and have spent their savings on long-term care. By the time Medicaid kicks in, these people ― your parents and loved ones ― have essentially been wiped out financially by old age and/or illness. Medicaid is the last resort, the final stop. Medicaid money ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
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Drinking alcohol causes damage to your health in both the short term and long term, even for moderate drinkers. For individuals who suffer from addiction to alcohol and frequently drink in excess, these risks become higher. Knowing the risks of drinking alcohol is important to help avoid drinking to excess and reduce the likelihood of these risks. Short-Term Risks of Drinking Alcohol There are many short-term risks that occur when drinking alcohol. These risks can happen to anyone, including individuals suffering from alcohol use disorder, or individuals who are drinking for the very first time. Injuries When you drink al...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility alcohol use risks Source Type: blogs
Sponsored National Family Caregivers Month which runs all of November is our day, so fellow caregivers, let’s celebrate! According to AARP, we are 40 million strong, so we deserve it. This campaign, themed #BeCareCurious, focuses on recognizing the sacrifice of family caregivers while it emphasizes those sometimes, hard-earned rewards. Philips is joining in this recognition, as well. The company has been involved in family caregiving though their Philips Lifeline personal alert service, but is now expanding to provide even more help through their new app, Philips Cares. This is a place where subscribers can organize ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Photo Image Caleb George Dear Carol: Both of my parents were ill for years. Mom, who died two years ago, fought several types of cancer and then developed dementia. Dad, who died three months ago, had a massive stroke right after Mom’s death and his last years were full of physical and emotional pain. My brother and I grieve our parents, but we saw them wear out from health struggles and feel that they are now together in a better place, so there’s quite of bit of relief, as well. Knowing our parents are no longer suffering is part of the relief, but I’m also relieved that I can now spend more time w...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fifth of survivors stay silent on their fears, study shows Related items fromOnMedica Millions miss out on vital diabetes health checks Patients with atrial fibrillation to be targeted in stroke reduction programme TV awareness ads on stroke and cancer to be relaunched Fund specialist dementia training to improve care and save money Safeguarding: what lies ahead for 2019
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
In this study, the most common reason that patients or their doctors stopped statins was the development of advanced cancer or other major illness. In my practice, I have also cared for many patients who have stopped taking statins or who express reluctance to take statins due to side effects. The most common side effect is muscle ache (typically tenderness or soreness of the large muscle groups, such as the biceps and thighs), which affects about 20% of statin takers and reverses when the statin is discontinued. There is also a slightly increased risk of diabetes with long-term statin use and, very rarely, liver problems....
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Healthy Aging Heart Health Source Type: blogs
Mediterranean diet: The role of long-chain ω-3 fatty acids in fish; polyphenols in fruits, vegetables, cereals, coffee, tea, cacao and wine; probiotics and vitamins in prevention of stroke, age-related cognitive decline, and Alzheimer disease. Rev Neurol (Paris). 2019 Sep 11;: Authors: Román GC, Jackson RE, Gadhia R, Román AN, Reis J Abstract The mechanisms of action of the dietary components of the Mediterranean diet are reviewed in prevention of cardiovascular disease, stroke, age-associated cognitive decline and Alzheimer disease. A companion article provides a comprehensive revi...
Source: Revue Neurologique - Category: Neurology Tags: Rev Neurol (Paris) Source Type: research
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