Prince Philip's Retirement Shocker Isn't All That Shocking

The Duke of Edinburgh plans to retire from his royal duties this autumn, Buckingham Palace announced Thursday morning, ending a night of speculation and worry that the palace was about to share news of far more gravitas. So yes, at age 95, Prince Philip is retiring. He spent 110 days of the past year attending official royal events, which makes him the fifth-busiest member of the royal family, according to Court Circular listings and as reported by the BBC. And he will continue to support the queen. But as far as making appearances on his own, well, he’s stepping back. He has no health issues beyond those associated with being a man his age, the palace said, prompting the BBC to reprint what he said on the occasion of his 90th birthday: It’s “better to get out before you reach your sell-by date.” He’s always been quick to quip ― when a man at a royal lunch Thursday said to him, “I’m sorry to hear you’re standing down,” the duke replied, “Well, I can’t stand up much.” Precisely. Of course we all age differently. But there are a few truths about being 95 that science and research can impart ― all realities that make slowing down sound pretty sensible. About that standing thing A person’s ability to transition from sitting to standing becomes critical as they age. Losing balance can lead to falls, which are the No. 1 cause of injuries and death among the elderly, says the Center...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 11 December 2019Source: Trends in GeneticsAuthor(s): Lindsey D. Goodman, Nancy M. BoniniThe presence of microsatellite repeat expansions within genes is associated with>30 neurological diseases. Of interest, (GGGGCC)>30-repeats within C9orf72 are associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD). These expansions can be 100s to 1000s of units long. Thus, it is perplexing how RNA-polymerase II (RNAPII) can successfully transcribe them. Recent investigations focusing on GGGGCC-transcription have identified specific, canonical complexes that may promot...
Source: Trends in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Rejuvenation Research, Ahead of Print.
Source: Rejuvenation Research - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Source Type: research
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of falls can be as high as 73% in the stroke population. Falls occur as a result of multiple factors. Factors such as balance impairments can be improved through physical therapy intervention. However, insurance payers limit the ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news
Fifty years ago, an extraordinary group of pathologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists met to address the limited research and numerous diagnoses applied to unexplained, largely sleep-related pediatric deaths. Their efforts led to the identificati...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: This novel technology discriminates and quantifies subtle differences in behavior and neurological impairments in subjects afflicted with neurological injury/disease. KINARM assessments can be incorporated into multi-center trials (e.g., monitoring stroke motor recovery: NCT02928393). Further studies will determine if KINARM Labs can demonstrate a clinical effect with fewer subjects over a shorter trial period. Disclosures/funding: Dr. Stephen Scott is the inventor of KINARM and CSO of BKIN Technologies.   Multiplexed mass spectrometry assay identifies neurodegeneration biomarkers in CSF Presenter: Chelsky...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Assessment Tools biomarkers Cognition Current Issue Drug Development General Genetics Medical Issues Neurology Patient Assessment Psychopharmacology Scales Special Issues Supplements Trial Methodology clinical trials CNS Su Source Type: research
SPECIAL FROM “As many as five million Americans age 65 and older may have Alzheimer’s Disease, and that number is expected to double for every five-year interval beyond age 65.” — the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke. While Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, it is not the only form. Risk factors for all kinds of dementia include, age, alcohol use, smoking, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension, and genetics. However, researchers have found some startling connections that show other surprising factors that can heighten your risk: Risk Factor #1: Anticho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The last time I had a mammogram, I got a big surprise — and it was a good one. A string quartet was playing just outside the doors of the breast imaging center, and my thoughts immediately shifted from “What are they going to find on the mammogram?” to “Is that Schubert, or Beethoven?” By the time my name was called, I had almost forgotten why I was there. The unexpected concert was the work of Holly Chartrand and Lorrie Kubicek, music therapists and co-coordinators of the Environmental Music Program at Massachusetts General Hospital. But bringing music to hospital corridors is just a sideline...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Pain Management Surgery Source Type: news
Sixty-nine percent of Americans adults are overweight, and over 35 percent are obese. Obesity increases your risk for numerous conditions including heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and cancer. Sadly, about 3.4 million adults die each year from being overweight or obese. Globally obesity now kills about the same as tobacco and all wars, terrorism and violence. Nearly all people who are overweight already have "pre-diabetes" and have significant risks of disease and death. They just don't know it. When you begin to put on weight, especially lethal belly fat, your biology shifts out of ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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