Neuroscientists seek brain basis of craving in addiction and binge eating

(Center for BrainHealth) A new article in JAMA Psychiatry details the first step in revealing how craving works in the brain. Scientists at the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas are the first to propose a quantitative model for drug addiction research. The model focuses on craving: the intense, urgent feeling of needing or wanting drugs. Their ongoing research and subsequent findings have the potential to open a new frontier of alcohol and substance abuse treatment.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

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Conclusions The treatment used for PD, particularly DA, is associated with the development of ICDs and related behaviors. Susceptibility to these disorders depends on the associated risk factors. ICDs can have serious personal, family, psychosocial, financial, and medical consequences. However, in contrast, artistic activities have been described in patients with PD while undergoing treatment with DA. These patients are compulsive but report a positive influence on quality of life. These findings highlight the need for a very critical approach at the moment of Dopaminergic Replacement therapy choice. Author Contributio...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion It is clear that clinically, there is still much to be learnt about alexithymia and its relationship with a range of related phenomena. Firstly, is alexithymia a continuous and stable trait independent of psychological or somatic symptomology that is developed during childhood? Or is it instead a reactive state induced by trauma and distress at any age, which serves to defend against intense and upsetting emotions? This impacts on treatment options. For example, should we be focussing on early childhood interventions which target the child's emotional environment and parenting to encourage emotional exp...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Addiction — and recovery — can look differently from individual to individual. As surely as we can be addicted to alcohol, substances, or medications, we can just as easily be addicted to love, work, sex, dieting, exercise, skin picking, and food. Addiction can refer to any compulsive and unhealthy attachment or behavior that one uses as a way of artificially enhancing, numbing, or avoiding feelings.  Addictions have negative consequences and are difficult to just “stop” doing.  There are certainly different levels of medical and psychological risks associated with different kinds of addic...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Habits Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Binge Eating Eating Disorders Substance Use Source Type: blogs
Codependents often wonder what is normal. They feel insecure and wonder how others perceive them. Many tell me they don’t really know themselves. They’ve become people-pleasers, editing what they say and adapting their behavior to the feelings and needs of others. Some sacrifice themselves — their values, needs, wants, and feelings — to someone they care about. For other codependents their behavior revolves around their addiction, whether it’s to a drug, a process, such as sex or gambling, or to pursuing prestige or power in order to feel secure. They usually do so to the detriment of themselv...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Abuse Addictions Alcoholism Anger Binge Eating Codependence Eating Disorders Personality Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Substance Abuse Abusive Relationships Authentic Self Codependency Dysfunctional Family emotional needs Source Type: news
Do you often feel hopeless, like you’ve failed so many times that it’s not even worth trying anymore? Do you frequently dwell on all the mistakes you’ve made and all the relationships you’ve lost? Maybe you just feel like your life will never be meaningful so there’s no use trying to be anything or do anything. If thoughts like this are controlling your life, you may be using self-victimization to cope with issues you feel unable to manage. Exploring the Victim Mentality and the Role of the Victim The victim mentality can display itself in a variety of ways. People who play the role of a victi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Binge Eating Depression Eating Disorders Personality Recovery Relationships Self-Esteem Self-Help Substance Abuse Alcoholism Blame External locus of control Irresponsibility Learned Helplessness Manipulation Passi Source Type: blogs
As a relatively new and still poorly recognized concept, few people come to therapy identifying as suffering from Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD). As a rule, a diagnosis of C-PTSD comes only after the process of self-discovery in therapy has begun. When people suffering from C-PTSD are referred to a therapist, or decide to seek help for themselves, it is usually because they are seeking help for one of its symptoms, including dissociative episodes, problems forming relationships, and alcohol or substance abuse. One of the more common issues that leads to the discovery of C-PTSD is the presence of an eating ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Loneliness Psychology PTSD Trauma Treatment affect regulation Bingeing Body Image C-PTSD Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma complex posttraumatic stress di Source Type: news
Why can’t they stop? This is perhaps the most elusive question posed when it comes to addiction. The answer is just as elusive — fleeting, incomprehensible, and illusory, like a ghost amidst shadows in the night. When we ask the question, we are baffled as to why those addicted to particular substances or behaviors continue to use or engage — regardless of the negative physical, psychological, and social effects. We cannot seem to intricately understand why some people decide to walk right off the cantilever of life — falling into a seemingly inescapable abyss. The question is definitely not an easy...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Binge Eating Eating Disorders Grief and Loss Health Insurance Loneliness Psychology Psychotherapy Substance Abuse Treatment Addiction Recovery Alcohol Abuse Coping Skills Self Medication Source Type: news
When is the last time you were at an event that did not involve food? Perhaps it was a Monday morning committee meeting or church activity on Thursday night. Because food is such a prevalent part of our culture and it’s rare to have any kind of event where food is not served, it’s no surprise that this has become a problem – and even an addiction – for many people. And what makes it more of a challenge is that it’s an acceptable addiction. If someone has four pieces of pizza at lunch, it’s something people might laugh at or relate to but if somebody has four shots of alcohol during the d...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Binge Eating Book Reviews Diet & Nutrition Eating Disorders Psychology Weight Loss Body Image edward abramson healthy eating Obesity weight management Source Type: news
Endlessly revisiting what happened in the past, beating yourself up for the bad things that you’ve done won’t change anything. It certainly won’t make the events or actions go away. Yet the pattern of wallowing in remorse, guilt, shame and self-loathing doesn’t have to continue. Here are some tips on overcoming remorse that may help. 1. Work on becoming healthier. Flooded with toxic thoughts and emotions takes a toll on your body. Before you can begin to heal from the effects of remorse, you need to take action to restore your health. If you used drugs and alcohol as a crutch to deal with the pain, ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Binge Eating Creativity Habits Happiness Recovery Self-Esteem Self-Help Spirituality Treatment Coping Skills Guilt Negativity Optimism Remorse Self Discovery Self Loathing Shame Substance Abuse toxic shame Source Type: blogs
What if you had a pint of ice cream for dinner last night and spent three hours on social media? You probably wouldn’t hear any judgment at work the next day. In fact, your colleagues might nod and smile because they’ve been there. But what if you drank a fifth of vodka and gambled away your mortgage? No one’s laughing now. Instead they’re judging you. “How could you do such a thing?” they would ask. “Why didn’t you control yourself?” Any number of behaviors, whether socially acceptable — like eating and being on the internet — or not quite as acceptable, c...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Binge Eating Book Reviews Compulsive Gambling Disorders Eating Disorders General Medications Psychology Substance Abuse Treatment behavior books on addiction books on treatment Brian Odlaug Drug Addict Source Type: news
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