4 Ways Researchers Are Pushing The Boundaries Of Making Babies

Infertility treatment is more common than ever, thanks to technology.  More than 70,000 babies were born through in-vitro fertilization in 2014, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. That’s an increase of nearly 10,000 babies, compared with five years earlier. Men and women are increasingly likely to seek medical help for reasons that include reduced stigma and more employers offering coverage for IVF. But one big reason for the trend is clear: Fertility doctors are getting better at making babies. “Science is moving at a pace that’s very different than any of us could have ever imagined,” said Dr. Eli Adashi, a Brown University professor of reproductive medical science who specializes in ovarian biology. Researchers have fine-tuned the best ways to stimulate a woman’s ovaries, grow embryos in the lab and pick the best ones to transfer to her uterus. Improved success rates have made IVF ― once considered an experimental procedure ― the gold standard of fertility treatment. Here are some of the most inspiring breakthroughs that promise to rock fertility treatment further over the next decade: 1. Babies Made From Three People For the estimated 12,000 women in the U.S. who risk passing down devastating mitochondrial diseases, including neurological disorders, and heart and kidney problems, a new procedure can be the difference in deciding to have children or not.  Scientists h...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

Related Links:

[Nyasa Times] Government has challenged Mangochi District Council to step up efforts that will see improved up-take of family planning methods which is presently at 31 per cent in the district, the lowest in the country.
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - Category: OBGYN Source Type: news
New York nutritionist Juliana Shalek revealed the surprising foods you should avoid while pregnant - and the healthy alternatives to swap for so you don't miss out for nine months.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
[Nigeria Health Watch] The young mothers in the community fondly call her "Aunty Dada"
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - Category: OBGYN Source Type: news
AbstractMesoderm is derived from the primitive streak. The rostral region of the primitive streak forms the somitic mesoderm. We have previously shown the developmental origin of each level of the somitic mesoderm using DiI fluorescence labeling of the primitive streak. We found that the more caudal segments were derived from the primitive streak during the later developmental stages. DiI labeled several pairs of somites and showed the distinct rostral boundary; however, the fluorescence gradually disappeared in the caudal region. This finding can be explained in two ways: the primitive streak at a specific developmental s...
Source: Anatomical Science International - Category: Anatomy Source Type: research
In what ways might heart transplantation impact exercise tolerance?Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news
Researchers from Bristol University claim the increasing pressures of modern life are 'amplified' by pregnancy. Chronic stress, sleep deprivation and eating habits may also be to blame.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
I've not blogged in a very long time.  But it does seems to be TIME to pick the pen back up.Twenty years ago, executives running my hometown hospital (Randolph Hospital in Asheboro, North Carolina) fired me just two weeks after I answered the call of a terrified charge nurse and intervened in a " bad-baby " case being managed by a Cone-Healthcare-employed Family Practitioner.  After I stabilized the baby and shipped her to North Carolina Baptist/Brenner Children's Hospital, the doctor I " rescued " trashed me to the baby's parents - falsely alleging that I had somehow caused her harm - when, i...
Source: Dr.J's HouseCalls - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center led the nation in the number of solid organ transplants performed in 2017, with 641 procedures that included kidney, pancreas, lung, heart and intestine transplants, according to statistics from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.UCLA recorded 363 kidney transplants in 2017, making it the year ’s top kidney transplant center.Other medical centers with a high number of solid organ transplants in 2017 were UC San Francisco; Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri; and the University of Wisconsin ’s University Hospital in Ma...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
AbstractIn sub-Saharan Africa, theory and evidenced-based interventions that are systematically designed and using sound evaluation methods to report on effectiveness are limited. A sex education programme called SPEEK was developed, implemented and evaluated in Ghana using the Intervention Mapping approach. SPEEK aimed at delaying sexual initiation, reducing sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and preventing pregnancy, targeting junior high school students in a West African rural setting. The final programme included 11 (interactive) lessons using a diverse range of theory-based methods. In this article, we report on t...
Source: Health Education Research - Category: Research Source Type: research
Infertility treatment is more common than ever, thanks to technology.  More than 70,000 babies were born through in-vitro fertilization in 2014, according to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. That’s an increase of nearly 10,000 babies, compared with five years earlier. Men and women are increasingly likely to seek medical help for reasons that include reduced stigma and more employers offering coverage for IVF. But one big reason for the trend is clear: Fertility doctors are getting better at making babies. “Science is moving at a pace that’s very different th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Babies | Babies Heart Conditions | Biology | Biomedical Science | Cardiology | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) | Children | Cystic Fibrosis | Food and Drug Administration (FDA) | Genetics | Harvard | Heart | Heart Transplant | Infertility | Insurance | Kidney Transplant | Men | Menopause | Mitochondria | Mitochondrial Disease | Neurology | Neuroscience | Ovaries | Pregnancy | Rehabilitation | Reproduction Medicine | Science | Skin | Stem Cell Therapy | Stem Cells | Study | Urology & Nephrology | Websites | Women