Poor Sleep Hygiene Is Killing You And Your Career

The next time you tell yourself that you'll sleep when you're dead, realize that you're making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer. According to the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep. Why You Need Adequate Sleep to Perform We've always known that sleep is good for your brain, but new research from the University of Rochester provides the first direct evidence for why your brain cells need you to sleep (and sleep the right way—more on that later). The study found that when you sleep your brain removes toxic proteins from its neurons that are by-products of neural activity when you're awake. Unfortunately, your brain can remove them adequately only while you're asleep. So when you don't get enough sleep, the toxic proteins remain in your brain cells, wreaking havoc by impairing your ability to think—something no amount of caffeine can fix. Skipping sleep impairs your brain function across the board. It slows your ability to process information and problem solve, kills your creativity, and catapults your stress levels and emotional ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Authors: Sabet Sarvestani F, Azarpira N Abstract Heart and cerebral infarctions, as two important ischemic diseases, lead to the death of tissues due to inadequate blood supply and high mortality worldwide. These statuses are started via blockage of vessels and depletion of oxygen and nutrients which affected these areas. After reperfusion and restoration of oxygen supply, more severe injury was mediated by multifaceted cascades of inflammation and oxidative stress. microRNAs (miRNAs) as the regulator of biological and pathological pathways can adjust these conditions by interaction with their targets. Also, miRNAs...
Source: Immunological Investigations - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Immunol Invest Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The proposed PHARMAC criteria will give access to these important drugs to those people with T2DM who will likely benefit the most. PMID: 33032305 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Considering the low number of university students disclosing sexual assaults to health professionals or support services, the results of this survey suggest more work is needed to facilitate greater disclosures to health professionals enabling victims to access the services they need regardless of alcohol use. PMID: 33032303 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Authors: Siamashvili M, Davis S Abstract INTRODUCTION: Bromocriptine mesylate quick release (QR) is a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and is the only oral, primarily centrally acting drug that can be used for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: The authors describe current recommendations on the use of bromocriptine mesylate QR. Major efficacy and safety parameters of the late phase trials, including The Cycloset Safety Trial, have been identified and presented. EXPERT OPINION: Efficacy of bromocriptine mesylate QR monotherapy appears to be low but is compensated by favorable safety pr...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research
Acceptance of trauma can also help to reduce its damaging effects. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Sleep subscribers-only Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Vanda Craveiro, Elisabete Ramos, Joana Araújo
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2020Source: Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 75Author(s): Tingting Wang, Lin Zheng, Tiantian Zhao, Qi Zhang, Zhitong Liu, Xiaoling Liu, Mouming Zhao
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: NeuropsychologiaAuthor(s): Erin L. Meier, Shannon M. Sheppard, Emily B. Goldberg, Catherine R. Head, Delaney M. Ubellacker, Alexandra Walker, Argye E. Hillis
Source: Neuropsychologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Neurología (English Edition)Author(s): J.P. Martínez-Barbero, P. Tomás-Muñoz, R. Martínez-Moreno
Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
The next time you tell yourself that you'll sleep when you're dead, realize that you're making a decision that can make that day come much sooner. Pushing late into the night is a health and productivity killer. According to the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, the short-term productivity gains from skipping sleep to work are quickly washed away by the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on your mood, ability to focus, and access to higher-level brain functions for days to come. The negative effects of sleep deprivation are so great that people who are drunk outperform those lacking sleep. Why...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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