Why You Cannot See My Daughter's Autism

On our fifth and final day of a cross-country move from Maine to Minnesota, my husband, father-in-law, daughter and I walked into a bustling truck stop Denny’s. We were hungry, tired and sore, but my daughter, little trooper that she is, was sitting quietly beside me, already lost in her iPad. When the waitress approached, we ordered coffee and then I placed an order for my daughter: scrambled eggs, bacon and hot chocolate that needs to actually be lukewarm and also, for the love of God, without whipped cream, please-and-thank-you. The waitress looked at me, raised an eyebrow, and then looked at my daughter. “You’re a big girl now,” she said, matter-of-factly. “Your mother shouldn’t have to order for you.” There was no point in correcting her. I smiled the smile I saved for my worst customers in my own waitressing days, looked her in the eye and reminded her that I needed that coffee. My daughter is not rude. She’s not a brat. She can do a lot for herself. At 9 years old, she’s animated with those she is comfortable with ― but sensory overload in public settings means she’s probably playing “Minecraft” on her iPhone. If you want to get her attention, you need to touch her shoulder. Her headphones block out the noises a neurotypical person may not notice, so she can’t hear you call her name. My daughter has high-functioning autism, which is the diagnostic term doctors now use for what was...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Psychiatry, Volume 6, Issue 6Author(s): Ian C K Wong, Tobias Banaschewski, Jan Buitelaar, Samuele Cortese, Manfred Döpfner, Emily Simonoff, David Coghill, European ADHD Guidelines GroupSummaryAlthough pharmacological therapies are recommended as a key component in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, their use continues to prompt intense debate. Despite considerable research efforts, several gaps in the knowledge base and several questions over the quality of evidence exist. Particular issues surrounding pharmacological treatments include uncertaintie...
Source: The Lancet Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 May 2019Source: Mental Health &PreventionAuthor(s): Erin Hoare, Ingibjorg Eva Thorisdóttir, Alfgeir Logi Kristjansson, Inga Dora Sigfusdóttir, Josh Hayward, Steven Allender, Claudia Strugnell, Nicola Reavley, George Patton, Michael Berk, Felice JackaSummaryAdolescence is the primary age of onset for common psychiatric disorders and thus presents a singular opportunity for prevention, particularly in school settings. Research efforts have advanced the understanding of diverse and interacting risk and protective factors for anxiety and depression. Such factors span indi...
Source: Mental Health and Prevention - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In conclusion, our findings support other studies suggesting the importance of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of ADHD. Regarding the regulatory role of miRNAs in gene regulation, their contribution to etiopathogenesis and heterogeneity of ADHD should be investigated further.
Source: Journal of Psychiatric Research - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionsReflective pondering may act as a protective factor against later impairment in executive control.
Source: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
A trip down a bookstore aisle will reveal that there are as many different approaches to parenting as there are books to choose from. For every approach, there is an expert and a book to go along with it. In this modern age, there is probably a blog, too. The common theme between all these books is a problem to fix, a habit to address, or an issue to figure out. Then there is Differently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child in a Conventional World, a book as differently wired as the children it refers to. While it will be on the same shelf as a book about dealing with a “problem child,” Differently Wired isn&rsq...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Autism / Asperger's Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Disabilities Disorders Family General Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Pediatrics for Parents Personal Stories Psychology School Issues Self-Help Stress Stu Source Type: news
In conclusion, I’m not a typical special needs parent. I’m not worried day and night about my child’s distant future. There’s just enough in one day to worry about.
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: ADHD and ADD Anxiety and Panic Aspergers Autism Caregivers Children and Teens Personal Students Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Asperger Syndrome Education National Purposeful Parenting Month Special Needs Source Type: blogs
On our fifth and final day of a cross-country move from Maine to Minnesota, my husband, father-in-law, daughter and I walked into a bustling truck stop Denny’s. We were hungry, tired and sore, but my daughter, little trooper that she is, was sitting quietly beside me, already lost in her iPad. When the waitress approached, we ordered coffee and then I placed an order for my daughter: scrambled eggs, bacon and hot chocolate that needs to actually be lukewarm and also, for the love of God, without whipped cream, please-and-thank-you. The waitress looked at me, raised an eyebrow, and then looked at my daughter. &ld...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
In the largest national study of children with autism to date, researchers examined one of the most mysterious aspects of autism spectrum disorder: that it sometimes simply vanishes. An estimated 1 in 68 children have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder in the U.S., but researchers are beginning to take note of a small minority of children with ASD who seem to "grow out" of their diagnoses.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveyed more than 1,400 children with ASD -- the largest nationally representative sample of children with autism to date -- and found that about 13 percent of the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion Given emerging evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction, particularly in the electron transport chain needed for cellular energy production, is an underlying pathophysiological mechanism for some varieties of ASD, clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for mitochondrial disease, especially when they encounter a patient with unusual neurological or constitutional symptoms. The prevalence of mitochondrial disease in ASD patients may be as high as five percent, which means that it is not the “zebra”[27] diagnosis that it might be in a non-ASD patient, where prevalence is about 0.01 percent.10 R...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Anxiety Disorders Asperger's syndrome Autism Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Case Report Current Issue Intellectual Disability Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Pervasive Developmental Disorders ASD autism spectrum disorder dysauton Source Type: research
In 2013 I submitted as assignment on autistic people's writings as part of my Masters in Autism (Adults) for the University of Birmingham. The title of the topic as set by the university and my essay follows: There is an ever-increasing body of literature from people diagnosed with autism who are willing to share their experiences. Discuss and evaluate the potential impact of this body of literature upon other people on the autistic spectrum, upon autism researchers and upon providers of support and services.This essay will describe the growing body of writing by autistic writers, particularly that which has flourishe...
Source: The Voyage - Category: Child Development Source Type: blogs
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