Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Patient Experiences of Swallowing Exercises After Head and Neck Cancer: A Qualitative Study Examining Barriers and Facilitators Using Behaviour Change Theory

AbstractPoor patient adherence to swallowing exercises is commonly reported in the dysphagia literature on patients treated for head and neck cancer. Establishing the effectiveness of exercise interventions for this population may be undermined by patient non-adherence. The purpose of this study was to explore the barriers and facilitators to exercise adherence from a patient perspective, and to determine the best strategies to reduce the barriers and enhance the facilitators. In-depth interviews were conducted on thirteen patients. We used a behaviour change framework and model [Theoretical domains framework and COM-B (Capability –opportunity–motivation-behaviour) model] to inform our interview schedule and structure our results, using a content analysis approach. The most frequent barrier identified waspsychological capability. This was highlighted by patient reports of not clearly understanding reasons for the exercises, forgetting to do the exercises and not having a system to keep track. Other barriers included feeling overwhelmed by information at a difficult time (lack ofautomatic motivation) and pain and fatigue (lack ofphysical capability). Main facilitators included havingsocial support from family and friends, the desire to prevent negative consequences such as long-term tube feeding (reflective motivation), having the skills to do the exercises (physical capability), having a routine or trigger and receiving feedback on the outcome of doing exercises (...
Source: Dysphagia - Category: Speech Therapy Source Type: research

Related Links:

BY JEFF GOLDSMITH On July 17 of this year, I journeyed from Charlottesville Virginia, where I live, to Seattle to have my cervical spine rebuilt at Virginia Mason Medical Center, whose Neuroscience Institute has a national reputation for telling patients they don’t need surgery. It was my fifth complex surgical episode in 29 months, after more than fifty years of great health.  My patient experience has been wrenching, and it made me question yet again the conventional wisdom about doctors and patients that dominates much of our current health policy debate. None of these interventions was remotely elective: hea...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
[Image from unsplash.com]From Novarad touting its VR-surgical guidance system to Zynex paying off its $2.2M loan, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Stimwave announces first patient in Brazil Stimwave announced in a July 5 press release that its first patients in Brazil have received Stimwave’s wireless pain relief device treatment for chronic pain. The patients are expected to receive the neuromodulation treatment as an alternative to opioid pain relief. The devices created by Stimwave deliver small pulses of energy to specific nerves to trigger a reac...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Clinical Trials Diabetes Diagnostics Imaging Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Pain Management Research & Development American Red Cross Nemaura Medical Novarad Owlstone Medical Stimwave Tactical Medical Zynex Inc. Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 16 November 2016 Source:British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Author(s): S.D. Colbert, S. Ramakrishna, J.R. Harvey, P.A. Brennan Vertebral metastases from primary head and neck cancers are uncommon, and so there are no clear guidelines about management. The spinal cord can be compressed by a vertebral fracture or invasion of a tumour, and may present as an oncological and spinal emergency. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain and maintain neurological function. However, surgical treatments in this group of patients have not been defined, and primary operative treatment ...
Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Authors: Cocks H, Ah-See K, Capel M, Taylor P Abstract This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. It provides recommendations on the assessments and interventions for this group of patients receiving palliative and supportive care. Recommendations • Palliative and supportive care must be multidisciplinary. (G) • All core team members should have training in advanced communication skills. (G) • Palliative surgery should be considered in selected cases. (R) • Hypofractionated or short course radiotherapy sh...
Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Laryngol Otol Source Type: research
Vertebral metastases from primary head and neck cancers are uncommon, and so there are no clear guidelines about management. The spinal cord can be compressed by a vertebral fracture or invasion of a tumour, and may present as an oncological and spinal emergency. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain and maintain neurological function. However, surgical treatments in this group of patients have not been defined, and primary operative treatment of spinal metastases remains controversial. Here we discuss their contemporary management.
Source: The British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
By Stacy SimonThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Keytruda (pembrolizumab) to treat people with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has spread or come back after previous chemotherapy treatment. It’s the first immunotherapy drug approved for head and neck cancer. Keytruda is already approved for melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer.The FDA based its approval on a clinical trial of 174 people with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that had spread or come back after they were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Tumors shrank or disappeared in 16% of the participants who were given...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Source Type: news
ConclusionThere is a syndrome of late neurological effects after RT, salvage surgery, and pharyngeal instrumentation that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2015
Source: Head and Neck - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Some may think another cancer awareness week is like Hallmark's Friendship Day -- nice, but not necessary. National Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer Awareness Week will take place April 10-16, 2016, and it's more important than ever because there actually is a big lack of awareness. Did you know that HPV-related throat cancer is on the rise at an alarming rate? According to the National Cancer Institute, the three most common cancers are breast, lung, and prostate cancer. But there will be an estimated 61,000 oral and throat cancer cases in 2016; an estimated 13,000 cases will result in death. Of those, some 9,000 people ar...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 4 April 2016 Source:Journal of Clinical Neuroscience Author(s): Sheri K. Palejwala, Kevin A. Lawson, Sean L. Kent, Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Travis M. Dumont Osteoradionecrosis is a known complication following radiation therapy, presenting most commonly in the cervical spine as a delayed consequence of radiation that is often necessary in the management of head and neck cancers. In contrast, osteoradionecrosis has rarely been described in the lumbar spine. Here we describe, to our knowledge, the first reported case of lumbar spine osteoradionecrosis, after adjuvant radiation for a p...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Most people view their twice-yearly visits to the dentist as little more than a cleaning and a check-up. But in reality, those visits are much more important than you probably realize. That's because your dentist is looking inside your mouth for a lot more than cavities. Plenty of medical conditions -- including some alarming ones! -- manifest in the mouth, which is the part of your body your dentist knows the most about. In fact, it's possible that your dentist is able to alert you of a potentially serious condition long before you even think about going to a primary care doctor. Here's a list of some of the medical cond...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Back Pain | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Head and Neck Cancer | Pain | Speech-Language Pathology | Sports Medicine | Study