Patient Experiences of Swallowing Exercises After Head and Neck Cancer: A Qualitative Study Examining Barriers and Facilitators Using Behaviour Change Theory

AbstractPoor patient adherence to swallowing exercises is commonly reported in the dysphagia literature on patients treated for head and neck cancer. Establishing the effectiveness of exercise interventions for this population may be undermined by patient non-adherence. The purpose of this study was to explore the barriers and facilitators to exercise adherence from a patient perspective, and to determine the best strategies to reduce the barriers and enhance the facilitators. In-depth interviews were conducted on thirteen patients. We used a behaviour change framework and model [Theoretical domains framework and COM-B (Capability –opportunity–motivation-behaviour) model] to inform our interview schedule and structure our results, using a content analysis approach. The most frequent barrier identified waspsychological capability. This was highlighted by patient reports of not clearly understanding reasons for the exercises, forgetting to do the exercises and not having a system to keep track. Other barriers included feeling overwhelmed by information at a difficult time (lack ofautomatic motivation) and pain and fatigue (lack ofphysical capability). Main facilitators included havingsocial support from family and friends, the desire to prevent negative consequences such as long-term tube feeding (reflective motivation), having the skills to do the exercises (physical capability), having a routine or trigger and receiving feedback on the outcome of doing exercises (...
Source: Dysphagia - Category: Speech Therapy Source Type: research

Related Links:

My next blog post will be entitled " The Lie of Precision Medicine "— sarcastic_f (@sarcastic_f)June 23, 2018This post will be my own personalized rant about the false promises of personalized medicine. It will not be about neurological or psychiatric diseases, the typical topics for this blog. It will be about oncology, for very personal reasons: misery, frustration, and grief. After seven months of research on immunotherapy clinical trials, I couldn't find a single [acceptable] one1 in either Canada or the US that would enroll my partner with stage 4 cancer. For arbitrary reasons, for financial reaso...
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
It’s almost May and here in the northeast, front-of-the-pharmacy aisles are filled with myriad brands and types of sunscreen. While sunscreen is essential to lowering your risk for skin cancer, there are other simple, over-the-counter options you can incorporate into your summer skin protection routine. Nicotinamide may help prevent certain skin cancers Nicotinamide is a form of vitamin B3 that has been shown to reduce the number of skin cancers. In a randomized controlled trial performed in Australia (published in the New England Journal of Medicine), the risks of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma wer...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Prevention Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs
Bill is a 58-year-old male with a history of head and neck cancer as well as chronic low back pain who presents to his new primary care doctor for a routine checkup and visit for a medication refill. He works in construction and has been on chronic opioid therapy after his cancer — with a stable dose of 15 mg of oxycodone for over five years. At his new primary care visit, after a few meet and greet pleasantries, his new primary care doctor discusses his current medication regimen with him — ibuprofen 400mg TID and oxycodone 15mg BID. His physician expresses significant concern with his medication regimen, tell...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs
We present a rare case of vocal cord squamous cell cancer that metastasized to the spinal cord and cauda equina. A 63-year-old man presented with acute back pain and bilateral leg weakness 5 months after having a surgical treatment for moderately differentiated vocal cord squamous cell cancer (T2 N0 M0). Restaging 18F-FDG PET examination demonstrated a soft tissue mass with intense hypermetabolism in the distal spinal cord and a hypermetabolic leptomeningeal metastatic deposit at the L3 level. The findings were confirmed on MRI prior to treatment.
Source: Clinical Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: Interesting Images Source Type: research
BY JEFF GOLDSMITH On July 17 of this year, I journeyed from Charlottesville Virginia, where I live, to Seattle to have my cervical spine rebuilt at Virginia Mason Medical Center, whose Neuroscience Institute has a national reputation for telling patients they don’t need surgery. It was my fifth complex surgical episode in 29 months, after more than fifty years of great health.  My patient experience has been wrenching, and it made me question yet again the conventional wisdom about doctors and patients that dominates much of our current health policy debate. None of these interventions was remotely elective: hea...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
[Image from unsplash.com]From Novarad touting its VR-surgical guidance system to Zynex paying off its $2.2M loan, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Stimwave announces first patient in Brazil Stimwave announced in a July 5 press release that its first patients in Brazil have received Stimwave’s wireless pain relief device treatment for chronic pain. The patients are expected to receive the neuromodulation treatment as an alternative to opioid pain relief. The devices created by Stimwave deliver small pulses of energy to specific nerves to trigger a reac...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Clinical Trials Diabetes Diagnostics Imaging Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Pain Management Research & Development American Red Cross Nemaura Medical Novarad Owlstone Medical Stimwave Tactical Medical Zynex Inc. Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 16 November 2016 Source:British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Author(s): S.D. Colbert, S. Ramakrishna, J.R. Harvey, P.A. Brennan Vertebral metastases from primary head and neck cancers are uncommon, and so there are no clear guidelines about management. The spinal cord can be compressed by a vertebral fracture or invasion of a tumour, and may present as an oncological and spinal emergency. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain and maintain neurological function. However, surgical treatments in this group of patients have not been defined, and primary operative treatment ...
Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Authors: Cocks H, Ah-See K, Capel M, Taylor P Abstract This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. It provides recommendations on the assessments and interventions for this group of patients receiving palliative and supportive care. Recommendations • Palliative and supportive care must be multidisciplinary. (G) • All core team members should have training in advanced communication skills. (G) • Palliative surgery should be considered in selected cases. (R) • Hypofractionated or short course radiotherapy sh...
Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Laryngol Otol Source Type: research
Vertebral metastases from primary head and neck cancers are uncommon, and so there are no clear guidelines about management. The spinal cord can be compressed by a vertebral fracture or invasion of a tumour, and may present as an oncological and spinal emergency. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain and maintain neurological function. However, surgical treatments in this group of patients have not been defined, and primary operative treatment of spinal metastases remains controversial. Here we discuss their contemporary management.
Source: The British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
By Stacy SimonThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Keytruda (pembrolizumab) to treat people with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has spread or come back after previous chemotherapy treatment. It’s the first immunotherapy drug approved for head and neck cancer. Keytruda is already approved for melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer.The FDA based its approval on a clinical trial of 174 people with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that had spread or come back after they were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Tumors shrank or disappeared in 16% of the participants who were given...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Source Type: news
More News: Back Pain | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Head and Neck Cancer | Pain | Speech-Language Pathology | Sports Medicine | Study